Forum

Free news

FREE blog

Donate

Search

Subscribe

jews/911

Feedback

dna

Gun poll

RCC

AIDS

Home

Fathers

Surveys

Holocaust

IQ

14th Amdt

19th Amdt

Israelites

NWO

Homicide

Blacks

Whites

Signatory

Talmud

Watchman

Gaelic

Traitors

Health?

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


PREFACE

 

bulletThe Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is the la rgest, most comprehensive, and most rigorous international comparison of educatio n ever undertaken.

bulletTIMSS' rich information allows us not only to compare achievement, but also t o understand how life in U.S. schools differs from that in other nations.

bulletThis report on eighth-grade students is the first of a series of reports that will present findings on student achievement at the fourth grade, at the end of high school, as well as on various other topics.


CHAPTER 1: ACHIEVEMENT

 

bulletEighth-grade students of different abilities are typically divided into different classrooms in the U.S., and different schools in Germany. In Japan, n o ability grouping is practiced.
bulletIn the U.S. students in higher-level mathematics classes study different m aterial than students in lower-level classes. In Germany and Japan, all students study the same material, although in Germany, lower-level classes study it less deeply and rigorously.
bulletJapanese eighth-graders are preparing for a high-stakes examination to ent er high school at the end of ninth grade.
bulletU.S. teachers assign more homework and spend more class time discussing it than teachers in Germany and Japan. U.S. students report about the same amount of out-of-school math and science study as their Japanese and German counterparts .
bulletHeavy TV watching is as common among U.S. eighth graders as it is among th eir Japanese counterparts.



CHAPTER 2 : CURRICULUM


bulletThe content taught in U.S. eighth-grade mathematics classrooms is at a seventh-grade level in comparison to other countries.
bulletTopic coverage in U.S. eighth-grade mathematics classes is not as focused as in Germany and Japan.
bulletIn science, the degree of topic focus in the eighth-grade curriculum may b e similar to that of other countries.
bulletOur nation is atypical among TIMSS countries in its lack of a nationally-d efined curriculum.
bulletU.S. eighth graders spend more hours per year in math and science classes than German and Japanese students.



CHAPTER 3 : TEACHING


bulletThe content of U.S. mathematics classes requires less high-level thought t han classes in Germany and Japan.
bulletU.S. mathematics teachers' typical goal is to teach students how to do someth ing, while Japanese teachers' goal is to help them understand mathematical concep ts.
bulletJapanese teachers widely practice what the U.S. mathematics reform recommends , while U.S. teachers do so less frequently.
bulletAlthough most U.S. math teachers report familiarity with reform recommendatio ns, only a few apply the key points in their classrooms.


CHAPTER 4 : TEACHERS' LIVES

 

bulletUnlike new U.S. teachers, new Japanese and German teachers receive long-te rm structured apprenticeships in their profession.
bulletJapanese teachers have more opportunities to discuss teaching-related issu es than do U.S. teachers.
bulletU.S. teachers have more college education than their colleagues in all but a few TIMSS countries.
bulletStudent diversity and poor discipline are challenges not only for U.S. tea chers, but for their German colleagues as well.


CHAPTER 5 : STUDENTS' LIVES

 

bulletEighth-grade students of different abilities are typically divided into different classrooms in the U.S., and different schools in Germany. In Japan, n o ability grouping is practiced.
bulletIn the U.S. students in higher-level mathematics classes study different m aterial than students in lower-level classes. In Germany and Japan, all students study the same material, although in Germany, lower-level classes study it less deeply and rigorously.
bulletJapanese eighth-graders are preparing for a high-stakes examination to ent er high school at the end of ninth grade.
bulletU.S. teachers assign more homework and spend more class time discussing it than teachers in Germany and Japan. U.S. students report about the same amount of out-of-school math and science study as their Japanese and German counterparts .
bulletHeavy TV watching is as common among U.S. eighth graders as it is among th eir Japanese counterparts.


CONCLUSIONS

bulletNo single factor can be considered to influence student performance in isolati on from other factors. There are no single answers to complex questions.
bulletThe content of U.S. eighth-grade mathematics classes is not as challenging as tha t of other countries, and topic coverage is not as focused.
bulletMost U.S. mathematics teachers report familiarity with reform recommendations, al though only a few apply the key points in their classrooms.
bulletEvidence suggests that U.S. teachers do not receive as much practical training an d daily support as their German and Japanese colleagues.
 

TRAITOR McCain

jewn McCain

ASSASSIN of JFK, Patton, many other Whites

killed 264 MILLION Christians in WWII

killed 64 million Christians in Russia

holocaust denier extraordinaire--denying the Armenian holocaust

millions dead in the Middle East

tens of millions of dead Christians

LOST $1.2 TRILLION in Pentagon
spearheaded torture & sodomy of all non-jews
millions dead in Iraq

42 dead, mass murderer Goldman LOVED by jews

serial killer of 13 Christians

the REAL terrorists--not a single one is an Arab

serial killers are all jews

framed Christians for anti-semitism, got caught
left 350 firemen behind to die in WTC

legally insane debarred lawyer CENSORED free speech

mother of all fnazis, certified mentally ill

10,000 Whites DEAD from one jew LIE

moser HATED by jews: he followed the law

f.ck Jesus--from a "news" person!!

1000 fold the child of perdition

 

Hit Counter

 

Modified Saturday, March 11, 2017

Copyright @ 2007 by Fathers' Manifesto & Christian Party