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AYRANISM

The term "Aryan" has been bandied around lately, largely because
of the trial of "Aryan-Nations" founder Richard Butler.

But, what does the word mean? What relevance does it have?
Butler uses the term repeatedly. The Nationalist Movement lists
it in its Glossary of "Words to Avoid." Saddam Hussein uses the term
to describe himself. So, what's the score?

"Arian" was first used to describe a heresy in the Christian church
which arose about 325 A.D. Arius preached that Christ was not divine,
which contradicted general beliefs, at the time.

A meeting was summoned by Constantine to resolve the controversy.
The Nicene Creed was promulgated at that gathering, which established
the doctrine of the Trinity: God, Son and Holy Ghost. Arius, who
refused
to go along with the new creed, was banished by Constantine and the
Arian
Heresy, as it became known, died out.

"Aryan" came to refer to Indo-European inhabitants of the Babylonian
area, also known as Mesopotamia, in the Middle-East. Aryans built
low-grade civilizations, from time to time, but were Asiatics --
sometimes
called Persians -- perpetually at war with ancient Greece and Rome.

They were defeated by Alexander the Great and pushed back by
Constantine. They became darker and more mixed with Negroes over
the centuries. In 1453, they overwhelmed Constantinople and
destroyed Southern Europe, ravaging the land and corrupting blood.
Today, they are known as Arabs, dark-skinned and primitive.

What are termed Cro-Magnon or Caucasian people had considerable
sway over the area in ancient times. Arising out of Northern Europe,
people who resembled modern-day Americans ruled from Scandinavia
to China, conquering and spreading civilization, as they went.

While their numbers may not have been overwhelming, their power
was. The mummy of an ancient ruler of China was recently unearthed
displaying red hair and Caucasian features. Similar people pushed
into India, establishing their rule and civilization. They, also,
set up the caste system to insulate themselves from the darker and
more backward inhabitants.

Some have referred to the Caucasian rulers Europe, the Middle-East
and the Orient as Aryans, but the term is a misnomer. The "Aryans"
were the peoples who were conquered and ruled over, in the
Middle-East.

Today, there are dark-skinned inhabitants of India who bear Caucasian
features, indicating that the original Cro-Magnon conquerors, indeed,
were present, but that their bloodlines have been corrupted and lost.

There are, also, pockets of descendants of the Alexandrian conquest
throughout the Middle-East and Asia, some even speaking a dialect of
Greek, even to this day, though their blood and lineage has been
long since corrupted.

Iran, formerly known as Persia, is a corruption of the word "Aryan."
Saddam Hussein refers to Iranians as "Aryans," a kind of idyllic way
of suggesting that his debauched people had some sort of elevated
blood, eons ago.

"Aryan" took a different turn in the last century when the great
musician,
Richard Wagner, penned compositions glorifying Nordic Man. Wagner
conjured up a potent brew of Viking, pagan and heroic folklore to
energize Caucasians in Northern Europe who has not been mixed
or corrupted over the years.

The term "Aryan" came to describe Germanic people who had a
sense of their own worth or destiny.

Adolf Hitler picked up on the term and made it a foundation of his
regime. An entire program called "Lebensborn" was instituted to
bring about a lineage of supermen -- of pure blood, Nordic character
and powerful limb -- who would be called Aryans.

"Aryan" has found its way, occasionally, into scientific texts in
referring
to blood and anthropology, but it never was widely used. After World
War II, the term was disfavored because of its association with the
losing side.

Some pro-communist and leftist elements, primarily in America, began
to use "Aryan" to refer to Caucasians or pro-American activists. The
intent was to acquaint them with World-War-II enemies and tag a "loser"

label on them, in some manner.

Americans, generally, have referred to themselves as Anglo-Saxons,
over the years, referring to the British and Germanic origins of the
nation and people.

Theodore Roosevelt often referred to Anglo-Saxon blood and heritage
and America was generally referred to as an Anglo-Saxon country in
schoolbooks. The term "WASP" for "White, Anglo-Saxon Protestant"
was used, beginning in Fifties, by leftist outfits to try to deride the

blood and character of America.

The term "Nordic" was used in both Europe and America to describe
fair-skinned, blond individuals who were generally idealized as
warriors, leaders and ascendant stock. The science of eugenics
sprung up at the turn of the century to propagate Nordic blood and
Caucasian characteristics on the grounds that better blood created
better civilization and a better world.

In response to "black-power," hippie and communist initiatives in the
Sixties, some anti-communist Americans began using the term "Aryan"
to describe themselves. The term caught on in Europe among many
"neo-Nazi" adherents bent on resurrecting a pre-World-War-II society.

"The Order," a small band of renegades who robbed banks and
conducted murders, received vast attention for its self-declared
"Aryan" proposals in behalf of setting up a Hitler regime on the North
American continent.

Butler picked up on the term, establishing a cult using the name and
invoking religion to bolster his ideas. He preached that "Aryans" were
the original tribes of Israel, a corruption of the British Israelite
doctrine
which holds that English monarchs symbolically sit on the Biblical
throne of David.

In the Eighties, William Pierce, a former associate of George Lincoln
Rockwell -- who promulgated the self-styled American Nazi Party twenty
years earlier -- took up using the term "Aryan." He used it to provoke

violence and call for killing "non-Aryan" individuals.

In response to Pierce and a court ruling which found Pierce guilty
of advocating violence, the Internal Revenue Service enacted a
regulation
called the "Methodology Test," which it employed to penalize anyone
using the term "Aryan" or even white, as part of social activism.

David Duke, who was elected to the Louisiana legislature on a
"white-rights" ticket, became a target of the IRS. His organization
and paper folded when his tax-exemption was yanked.

When Duke tried a comeback, he joined forces with Pierce and began
to declare that "I am an Aryan." He soundly lost his comeback bid.

One "Wolfgang Hawke" attempted to organize an "Aryan" festival in
Washington, which fizzled when it was revealed that his name was
actually Andrew Greenbaum. However, rightist individuals, from time to

time, have sponsored "Aryan" festivals in which they seek to attract
Caucasians and showcase sheer defiance of their opponents.

So, "Aryan" had come to be used by those who want to revive Hitler,
in some way, who try to castigate pro-American activists or even who
try to impersonate others.

Greenbaum and Butler even called themselves "Nationalists," while
also calling themselves "Aryans."

Some even confuse the term "Aryan" with Nordic. Bryan J. Brown,
a left-wing cultist who frequently criticizes Nationalists, refers to
himself
as an "Aryan without prejudice," meaning that he apparently has Nordic
features but apes the miscegenationist line.

When the Internet began to become popular, some protesters posted
pages touting the word "Aryan" to denounce Mexican immigration,
school integration and African degeneration of society, in general.

One curiosity-seeker who visited Crosstar, the Nationalist website,
early
on, expressed surprise. "Where are the references to Hitler?" he
asked.
"I thought that they were supposed to be on any 'Aryan' site," he said.

The word "Nationalist" has been used by many rightists lately to avoid
the misunderstandings, conflicts and penalties which can be associated
with use of the word "Aryan." "Aryan," say Nationalists, is a "buzz
word"
which carries considerable excess baggage and, invariably, conjures up
images of dead dictators, alien ideologies and lost causes.

Corkey Bowman, a Nationalist Skinhead, made a nationwide television
appeal to "get away from that term." "We don't need it and don't use
it,"
he said, encouraging the use of the term "Nationalist."

"I don't even like to mention words other than Nationalist, but some
people
may not know why we say to avoid other words, so we need to teach and
educate people," Bowman said.

The Butler incident has, in addition, associated "Aryan" with cultism,
a kind of David-Koresh operation which aims to shoot it out with people
or fence off some compound from the rest of the country. The term is
now widely regarded as terroristic and anti-social.

Nationalists acknowledge that while "Aryan" may have some appeal
among those fighting "asylum-seekers" in Europe, it is a bust in
America.
Even Europeans who glorify "Aryanism" often express resentment when
past thinkers and musicians are misrepresented or music debased.

Nationalists appealed the IRS ban on "Aryan" to the United States
Supreme
Court, but were rebuffed. "It's a question of how can we use the
system
to get our message out, confront and defeat our opponents and usher in
a new age," said Nationalist Secretary Wendell Gardner.

"Bringing in a new Age of Nationalism has appeal. That should be our
tactic and our goal," Gardner said.

Gardner noted that he generally does not like to be critical of those
who have used various "buzz words" in the past. "It's about education
and knowledge and being effective," he insisted. "We will define
ourselves
by our own terms, not by what others want to call us."

Nationalists rely on the terms "American," "Nationalist" and "pro
majority"
to describe themselves and their activities. They have successfully
boycotted and challenged news-media outlets which try to portray them
otherwise.

The Butler trial is expected to set use of the word "Aryan" back
considerably and for Twenty-First Century "Aryanism" to fade away,
much as "Arianism" did in the Fourth Century.

Nationalists are taking a cue from Constantine by calling "Unity Fests"
to thrash out doctrine and words which will energize and solidify
rightist activism.

"As failed words and tactics pass away, patriots will be seeking better
and
newer ways to change things, based on 100% Americanism. Nationalism
should not be the quicksand, where people are sucked down, but the
lightning rod, which attracts energy and produces power," said Gardner.

See  http://www.nationalist.org/alt/2000/sep/aryan.html  

 

AYRANISM

The term "Aryan" has been bandied around lately, largely because
of the trial of "Aryan-Nations" founder Richard Butler.

But, what does the word mean? What relevance does it have?
Butler uses the term repeatedly. The Nationalist Movement lists
it in its Glossary of "Words to Avoid." Saddam Hussein uses the term
to describe himself. So, what's the score?

"Arian" was first used to describe a heresy in the Christian church
which arose about 325 A.D. Arius preached that Christ was not divine,
which contradicted general beliefs, at the time.

A meeting was summoned by Constantine to resolve the controversy.
The Nicene Creed was promulgated at that gathering, which established
the doctrine of the Trinity: God, Son and Holy Ghost. Arius, who
refused
to go along with the new creed, was banished by Constantine and the
Arian
Heresy, as it became known, died out.

"Aryan" came to refer to Indo-European inhabitants of the Babylonian
area, also known as Mesopotamia, in the Middle-East. Aryans built
low-grade civilizations, from time to time, but were Asiatics --
sometimes
called Persians -- perpetually at war with ancient Greece and Rome.

They were defeated by Alexander the Great and pushed back by
Constantine. They became darker and more mixed with Negroes over
the centuries. In 1453, they overwhelmed Constantinople and
destroyed Southern Europe, ravaging the land and corrupting blood.
Today, they are known as Arabs, dark-skinned and primitive.

What are termed Cro-Magnon or Caucasian people had considerable
sway over the area in ancient times. Arising out of Northern Europe,
people who resembled modern-day Americans ruled from Scandinavia
to China, conquering and spreading civilization, as they went.

While their numbers may not have been overwhelming, their power
was. The mummy of an ancient ruler of China was recently unearthed
displaying red hair and Caucasian features. Similar people pushed
into India, establishing their rule and civilization. They, also,
set up the caste system to insulate themselves from the darker and
more backward inhabitants.

Some have referred to the Caucasian rulers Europe, the Middle-East
and the Orient as Aryans, but the term is a misnomer. The "Aryans"
were the peoples who were conquered and ruled over, in the
Middle-East.

Today, there are dark-skinned inhabitants of India who bear Caucasian
features, indicating that the original Cro-Magnon conquerors, indeed,
were present, but that their bloodlines have been corrupted and lost.

There are, also, pockets of descendants of the Alexandrian conquest
throughout the Middle-East and Asia, some even speaking a dialect of
Greek, even to this day, though their blood and lineage has been
long since corrupted.

Iran, formerly known as Persia, is a corruption of the word "Aryan."
Saddam Hussein refers to Iranians as "Aryans," a kind of idyllic way
of suggesting that his debauched people had some sort of elevated
blood, eons ago.

"Aryan" took a different turn in the last century when the great
musician,
Richard Wagner, penned compositions glorifying Nordic Man. Wagner
conjured up a potent brew of Viking, pagan and heroic folklore to
energize Caucasians in Northern Europe who has not been mixed
or corrupted over the years.

The term "Aryan" came to describe Germanic people who had a
sense of their own worth or destiny.

Adolf Hitler picked up on the term and made it a foundation of his
regime. An entire program called "Lebensborn" was instituted to
bring about a lineage of supermen -- of pure blood, Nordic character
and powerful limb -- who would be called Aryans.

"Aryan" has found its way, occasionally, into scientific texts in
referring
to blood and anthropology, but it never was widely used. After World
War II, the term was disfavored because of its association with the
losing side.

Some pro-communist and leftist elements, primarily in America, began
to use "Aryan" to refer to Caucasians or pro-American activists. The
intent was to acquaint them with World-War-II enemies and tag a "loser"

label on them, in some manner.

Americans, generally, have referred to themselves as Anglo-Saxons,
over the years, referring to the British and Germanic origins of the
nation and people.

Theodore Roosevelt often referred to Anglo-Saxon blood and heritage
and America was generally referred to as an Anglo-Saxon country in
schoolbooks. The term "WASP" for "White, Anglo-Saxon Protestant"
was used, beginning in Fifties, by leftist outfits to try to deride the

blood and character of America.

The term "Nordic" was used in both Europe and America to describe
fair-skinned, blond individuals who were generally idealized as
warriors, leaders and ascendant stock. The science of eugenics
sprung up at the turn of the century to propagate Nordic blood and
Caucasian characteristics on the grounds that better blood created
better civilization and a better world.

In response to "black-power," hippie and communist initiatives in the
Sixties, some anti-communist Americans began using the term "Aryan"
to describe themselves. The term caught on in Europe among many
"neo-Nazi" adherents bent on resurrecting a pre-World-War-II society.

"The Order," a small band of renegades who robbed banks and
conducted murders, received vast attention for its self-declared
"Aryan" proposals in behalf of setting up a Hitler regime on the North
American continent.

Butler picked up on the term, establishing a cult using the name and
invoking religion to bolster his ideas. He preached that "Aryans" were
the original tribes of Israel, a corruption of the British Israelite
doctrine
which holds that English monarchs symbolically sit on the Biblical
throne of David.

In the Eighties, William Pierce, a former associate of George Lincoln
Rockwell -- who promulgated the self-styled American Nazi Party twenty
years earlier -- took up using the term "Aryan." He used it to provoke

violence and call for killing "non-Aryan" individuals.

In response to Pierce and a court ruling which found Pierce guilty
of advocating violence, the Internal Revenue Service enacted a
regulation
called the "Methodology Test," which it employed to penalize anyone
using the term "Aryan" or even white, as part of social activism.

David Duke, who was elected to the Louisiana legislature on a
"white-rights" ticket, became a target of the IRS. His organization
and paper folded when his tax-exemption was yanked.

When Duke tried a comeback, he joined forces with Pierce and began
to declare that "I am an Aryan." He soundly lost his comeback bid.

One "Wolfgang Hawke" attempted to organize an "Aryan" festival in
Washington, which fizzled when it was revealed that his name was
actually Andrew Greenbaum. However, rightist individuals, from time to

time, have sponsored "Aryan" festivals in which they seek to attract
Caucasians and showcase sheer defiance of their opponents.

So, "Aryan" had come to be used by those who want to revive Hitler,
in some way, who try to castigate pro-American activists or even who
try to impersonate others.

Greenbaum and Butler even called themselves "Nationalists," while
also calling themselves "Aryans."

Some even confuse the term "Aryan" with Nordic. Bryan J. Brown,
a left-wing cultist who frequently criticizes Nationalists, refers to
himself
as an "Aryan without prejudice," meaning that he apparently has Nordic
features but apes the miscegenationist line.

When the Internet began to become popular, some protesters posted
pages touting the word "Aryan" to denounce Mexican immigration,
school integration and African degeneration of society, in general.

One curiosity-seeker who visited Crosstar, the Nationalist website,
early
on, expressed surprise. "Where are the references to Hitler?" he
asked.
"I thought that they were supposed to be on any 'Aryan' site," he said.

The word "Nationalist" has been used by many rightists lately to avoid
the misunderstandings, conflicts and penalties which can be associated
with use of the word "Aryan." "Aryan," say Nationalists, is a "buzz
word"
which carries considerable excess baggage and, invariably, conjures up
images of dead dictators, alien ideologies and lost causes.

Corkey Bowman, a Nationalist Skinhead, made a nationwide television
appeal to "get away from that term." "We don't need it and don't use
it,"
he said, encouraging the use of the term "Nationalist."

"I don't even like to mention words other than Nationalist, but some
people
may not know why we say to avoid other words, so we need to teach and
educate people," Bowman said.

The Butler incident has, in addition, associated "Aryan" with cultism,
a kind of David-Koresh operation which aims to shoot it out with people
or fence off some compound from the rest of the country. The term is
now widely regarded as terroristic and anti-social.

Nationalists acknowledge that while "Aryan" may have some appeal
among those fighting "asylum-seekers" in Europe, it is a bust in
America.
Even Europeans who glorify "Aryanism" often express resentment when
past thinkers and musicians are misrepresented or music debased.

Nationalists appealed the IRS ban on "Aryan" to the United States
Supreme
Court, but were rebuffed. "It's a question of how can we use the
system
to get our message out, confront and defeat our opponents and usher in
a new age," said Nationalist Secretary Wendell Gardner.

"Bringing in a new Age of Nationalism has appeal. That should be our
tactic and our goal," Gardner said.

Gardner noted that he generally does not like to be critical of those
who have used various "buzz words" in the past. "It's about education
and knowledge and being effective," he insisted. "We will define
ourselves
by our own terms, not by what others want to call us."

Nationalists rely on the terms "American," "Nationalist" and "pro
majority"
to describe themselves and their activities. They have successfully
boycotted and challenged news-media outlets which try to portray them
otherwise.

The Butler trial is expected to set use of the word "Aryan" back
considerably and for Twenty-First Century "Aryanism" to fade away,
much as "Arianism" did in the Fourth Century.

Nationalists are taking a cue from Constantine by calling "Unity Fests"
to thrash out doctrine and words which will energize and solidify
rightist activism.

"As failed words and tactics pass away, patriots will be seeking better
and
newer ways to change things, based on 100% Americanism. Nationalism
should not be the quicksand, where people are sucked down, but the
lightning rod, which attracts energy and produces power," said Gardner.

See  http://www.nationalist.org/alt/2000/sep/aryan.html  

 

TRAITOR McCain

jewn McCain

ASSASSIN of JFK, Patton, many other Whites

killed 264 MILLION Christians in WWII

killed 64 million Christians in Russia

holocaust denier extraordinaire--denying the Armenian holocaust

millions dead in the Middle East

tens of millions of dead Christians

LOST $1.2 TRILLION in Pentagon
spearheaded torture & sodomy of all non-jews
millions dead in Iraq

42 dead, mass murderer Goldman LOVED by jews

serial killer of 13 Christians

the REAL terrorists--not a single one is an Arab

serial killers are all jews

framed Christians for anti-semitism, got caught
left 350 firemen behind to die in WTC

legally insane debarred lawyer CENSORED free speech

mother of all fnazis, certified mentally ill

10,000 Whites DEAD from one jew LIE

moser HATED by jews: he followed the law

f.ck Jesus--from a "news" person!!

1000 fold the child of perdition

 

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