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From: "Scott Vaught" <svaught09@windstream.net>
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2010 10:33 AM
To: "Scott Vaught" <svaught09@windstream.net>
Subject: Fw: Hiroshima, then and now.


 
 
 


 
 
What is the story here?
What happened to the radiation that's supposed to last thousands of years??

 

 

HIROSHIMA  1945

cid:36399FBE611F4A1D8C156F443A5F4681@your318ruqz03z

cid:22C44BC4B6AE4A519F312CAADBD23A9F@your318ruqz03z

cid:CB59EA788708432D828000ACD616C301@your318ruqz03z
 

We all know that Hiroshima and Nagasaki were destroyed in August 1945 after explosion of atomic bombs.
However, we know little about the progress made by the people of that land during the past 64 years.


HIROSHIMA - 64 YEARS LATER



cid:C36A7662938C43E1B63F1AED2C75A00B@your318ruqz03z

cid:89D7FFFDD4934F649CC019F7558651A0@your318ruqz03z

cid:492FB5B5097F467F97D4BCB9FEEC1E0F@your318ruqz03z


cid:12C4BF11C6B34126BD87E6C597F4AE79@your318ruqz03z




cid:0AE422FB667642539427828C2CA2F389@your318ruqz03z

cid:47D144FAE79F4E5380198F9D8B3DF61B@your318ruqz03z




cid:D658197675AF49FE9C1AF6D77DCAFBC1@your318ruqz03z

cid:78F0A1C8368C4DEFA95AE6B8AD04D83C@your318ruqz03z

cid:0285940D038B47BEAF5804E106F43D14@your318ruqz03z


  

  

 

DETROIT - 64 YEARS AFTER HIROSHIMA

 

cid:267C0EE95E8C441CA3DB5E3B427F3B7C@your318ruqz03z

 

cid:7340AB45CBBC494198E875AE00602F0F@your318ruqz03z

 

cid:6A24F1E5EFF8423DB161824BE6708FED@your318ruqz03z

 

cid:E4B3817683D64288A5D08799A63BB7C2@your318ruqz03z

cid:1ABBA24FE3DE4B12AE696370A346C111@your318ruqz03z

 

cid:3D6FE0A2269E4B72A42016E862A37E56@your318ruqz03z

 

cid:8B7CEB00EB2744E98083494184A67C41@your318ruqz03z

 

cid:B0D9529446234C6CB9F57F094E88D8EB@your318ruqz03z

 

cid:010ECB218D374EC0BEB12980F5633733@your318ruqz03z

 

Tell me again, Who won World War II? America? 

 

 

 

 

GaWC - World Cities List

Think you live in an important city? Have arguments with your friends about which city is the best? Probably not! Well, I do. After all it is important to know what cities are great to visit and how your hometown baby fairs against other major cities.

Although there is a general consensus on which are the leading world cities, there is no agreed upon roster covering world cities below the highest level. So an Inventory of World Cities was made up by a team called GaWC Globalization and World Cities - Study Group & Network - At Loughborough University in the UK.  The inventory of world cities based upon their level of advanced producer services. Global service centres are identified and graded for accountancy, advertising, banking/finance and law. Aggregating these results produces a roster of hundreds of world cities at 5 levels: There are 40 Alpha. The only two ranking with A++ are New York and London.


Here are the links to the only "full service" world cities found globally.

ALPHA WORLD CITIES (A++)

London, New York

ALPHA WORLD CITIES (A+)

Paris, Tokyo, Sydney, Singapore, Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai

ALPHA WORLD CITIES (A)

Milan, Mumbai, Madrid, Moscow, Toronto, Kuala Lumpur, Brussels, Buenos Aires, Seoul

ALPHA WORLD CITIES (A)

Warsaw, Jakarta, Sao Paulo, ZurichMexico City, Dublin, Amsterdam, BangkokTaipei, Rome, Istanbul, Lisbon, Chicago, Frankfurt, Stockholm, Vienna, Budapest, Athens, Prague, CaracasAuckland, Santiago

Back To The Top | Copyright © 2009. All Rights Reserved for Luigi Di Serio

 

 

Swiss and German cities dominate
top places of best cities in the world

A report by Mercer Consulting

28 April 2009: While Zurich, Switzerland’s largest city and the country’s financial capital, is no longer number one, three Swiss cities make it into the top 10 of 'best' cities in the world. According to new research, Vienna, Austria’s capital, is now the city most people would like to call their home. Geneva retains its position in third place, while Vancouver and Auckland are now joint fourth in the rankings of best cities in the world, a survey prepared by Mercer Consulting. Overall, European cities continue to dominate the top locations in this year’s survey, with German cities particularly well represented among the top 50. Düsseldorf, Munich and Frankfurt are all among the top 10 best cities.

| Top ranked cities | The Americas | Europe | Middle East & Africa | Asia-Pacific | Cities with best infrastructure |

French and British cities fare middling in the 2009 Mercer Quality of Living Survey. Paris drops from 32nd to 33rd place, while London is still only placed 38th. Birmingham and Glasgow are jointly at 56. In the US, the highest-ranking entry is Honolulu at position 29. Singapore (26) is the top-scoring Asian city followed by Tokyo at 35. Baghdad, ranking 215, remains at the bottom of the table.

The rankings are based on a point-scoring index, which sees Vienna score 108.6, and Baghdad 14.4. Cities are ranked against New York as the base city with an index score of 100. Mercer’s Quality of Living ranking covers 215 cities and is conducted to help governments and major companies place employees on international assignments.

This year’s ranking also identifies the cities with the best infrastructure based on electricity supply, water availability, telephone and mail services, public transport provision, traffic congestion and the range of international flights from local airports. Singapore is at the top of this index (score 109.1) followed by Munich in second place and Copenhagen in third. Japanese cities Tsukuba (4) and Yokohama (5) fill the next two slots, whilst Düsseldorf and Vancouver share sixth place. Baghdad ranks at the bottom of the table with a score of only 19.6.

The world's top cities offering the best quality of life
(New York City is the base city with a score of 100 points)

2009 Rank
2008 Rank
City
Country
1
=2
Vienna Austria
2
1
Zurich Switzerland
3
=2
Geneva Switzerland
=4
4
Vancouver Canada
=4
5
Auckland New Zealand
6
6
Düsseldorf Germany
7
=7
Munich Germany
8
=7
Frankfurt Germany
9
9
Bern Switzerland
10
10
Sydney Australia
11
11
Copenhagen Denmark
12
12
Wellington New Zealand
13
13
Amsterdam Netherlands
14
14
Brussels Belgium
15
15
Toronto Canada
+16
19
Ottawa Canada
=16
16
Berlin Germany
18
+17
Melbourne Australia
19
=17
Luxembourg Luxembourg
20
20
Stockholm Sweden
21
21
Perth Australia
22
22
Montreal Canada
23
23
Nürnberg Germany
24
24
Oslo Norway
25
=25
Dublin Ireland
=26
32
Singapore Singapore
=26
25
Calgary Canada
28
27
Hamburg Germany
29
28
Honolulu USA
=30
=29
San Francisco USA
=30
=29
Helsinki Finland
=30
=29
Adelaide Australia
32
32
Paris France
34
34
Brisbane Australia
=35
35
Tokyo Japan
=35
37
Boston USA
37
36
Lyon France
=38
38
Yokohama Japan
=38
38
London UK
40
40
Kobe Japan
41
41
Milan Italy
=42
48
Portland USA
=42
42
Barcelona Spain
=44
=44
Washington DC USA
=44
=44
Osaka Japan
=44
=44
Lisbon Portugal
=44
=44
Chicago USA
48
43
Madrid Spain
49
49
New York City USA
50
49
Seattle USA
Research by Mercer Consulting

The Americas
There have been few changes in the rankings for North American cities. Canadian cities still dominate the top of the index for this region. Vancouver (4) retains the top spot and Honolulu (29) is the city in the United States with the highest quality of living. Washington and New York remain in positions 44 and 49 respectively.

In Central and South America, San Juan in Puerto Rico retains the highest ranking at 72, followed by Montevideo at 79. Port au Prince (206) in Haiti continues to rank lowest in the region and has gone down four places in the overall ranking due to food shortages experienced in 2008 and the subsequent riots.

In terms of city infrastructure, Vancouver (6) again tops the ranking for the whole of the region, with Atlanta following in position 15. Santiago in Chile has the best city infrastructure in Central and South America, whereas Port au Prince is again the lowest ranking at 212.


Europe
Europe’s cities once more dominate the world’s top 10 for quality of living. Vienna is the city rated with the best quality of living worldwide, moving up one place in the rankings following improvements in Austria’s political and social environment. The rest of the top 10 for Europe are dominated by German and Swiss cities, most of them retaining last year’s ranking and scores. Zurich, in second place, is followed by Geneva (3), Dusseldorf (6), Munich (7), Frankfurt (8) and Bern (9).

Many Eastern European cities have seen an increase in quality of living. A number of countries, which joined the European Union back in 2004 have experienced consistent improvement with increased stability, rising living standards and greater availability of international consumer goods. Ljubljana in Slovenia, for example, moves up four places to reach 78 while Bratislava moves up three places to 88. Zagreb moves three places to 103.

In the city infrastructure index, German cities fair particularly well with Munich (2) the highest ranked in the region, followed by Düsseldorf (6) and Frankfurt in joint eighth place with London. “German city infrastructure is amongst the best in the world, in part due to its first class airport facilities and connections to other international destinations,” said Mercer Consulting.

London’s ranking in the infrastructure index reflects the high level of public services offered, with its extensive public transport network and wide variety of telecommunication services.

Middle East and Africa
Dubai (77) in the United Arab Emirates and Port Louis in Mauritius (82) are the region’s cities with the best quality of living. Dubai’s transport facilities have witnessed improvements, with the development of its road infrastructure and expansion of its international airport, and the city is up six places in the ranking. Cape Town in South Africa, previously the city in the region with the best quality of living, has dropped substantially in this year’s ratings (from 80 to 87 in 2009). This move follows violent riots in South Africa’s main cities in 2008.

Baghdad (215) retains its position at the bottom of the table, though its index score has increased (from 13.5 to 14.4 in 2009) due to some slight improvements in its infrastructure and steps taken to encourage investment. Nevertheless, the lack of security and stability continue to have a large impact on quality of living and the city’s score remains far behind Bangui (29.3) in the Central African Republic, which is second to last.

In the city infrastructure index, most of the region’s cities rank below 100. The exceptions are Dubai (35),Tel Aviv (55) Jerusalem (70), Abu Dhabi (72), Port Louis in Mauritius (92) and Cairo (93). Baghdad (215) is again at the bottom of the list with a city infrastructure score of 19.6, while Port Harcourt in Nigeria is at 214, scoring 30.5.

Asia-Pacific
Auckland (4) retains its position as the highest-ranking city for quality of living in the region. Sydney follows at 10 and Wellington in New Zealand at 12. While the majority of the region’s cities retain a similar ranking to last year, Singapore (26) is the region’s highest riser, up six places since 2008. The city has gained importance as a financial centre and offers a wide range of international and private schools to cater to its expatriate community. Beijing has also moved three places in the ranking, up from 116 to 113, mainly due to improvements in public transport facilities from the 2008 Olympic Games.

Dropping down in the rankings, mainly due to a decline in stability and security are Bangkok (from 109 in 2008 to 120) and Mumbai (from 142 to 148). Thailand’s political turmoil continued throughout 2008 and 2009 with frequent and violent demonstrations and rallies taking place in Bangkok. Terrorist attacks in Mumbai have led to the city’s decline in quality of living for expatriates. Dhaka in Bangladesh holds the lowest ranking in the region at 205.

For city infrastructure, Singapore has the highest score world-wide (109.1). The city boasts an airport with excellent facilities and connections, as well as an efficient and extensive public transport network. Other high rankers in the region include Hong Kong (8), Sydney (11) and Tokyo (12). Dhaka ranks lowest in the region at 197.

The world's top cities offering the best infrastructure
(New York City is the base city with a score of 100 points)
2009 Rank
City
Country
1
Singapore Singapore
2
Munich Germany
3
Copenhagen Denmark
4
Tsukuba Japan
5
Yokohama Japan
=6
Düsseldorf Germany
=6
Vancouver Canada
=8
Frankfurt Germany
=8
Hong Kong China
=8
London UK
11
Sydney Australia
12
Tokyo Japan
13
Paris France
14
Zurich Switzerland
=15
Bern Switzerland
=15
Montreal Canada
=15
Atlanta USA
=18
Toronto Canada
=18
Vienna Austria
=20
Hamburg Germany
=20
Helsinki Finland
=20
Oslo Norway
=20
Stockholm Sweden
=24
Brussels Belgium
=24
Washington DC USA
26
Amsterdam Netherlands
27
Nürnberg Germany
28
Chicago USA
=29
Berlin Germany
=29
Nagoya Japan
=29
Osaka Japan
32
New York City USA
33
Boston USA
34
Kobe Japan
=35
Dubai UAE
=35
Geneva Switzerland
=35
Melbourne Australia
=38
Adelaide Australia
=38
Brisbane Australia
=38
Perth Australia
41
Honolulu USA
42
Ottawa Canada
=43
Auckland New Zealand
=43
Madrid Spain
=45
Birmingham UK
=45
Glasgow UK
=47
Wellington New Zealand
=47
Miami USA
=49
Houston USA
=49
Seattle USA
=49
Milan Italy
Research by Mercer Consulting


Research
methodology

Mercer Consulting largely collected its data between September and November 2008 and is regularly updated to take account of changing circumstances. In particular, the assessments are revised in the case of any new developments. The Mercer database contains more than 420 cities, however only 215 cities have been considered for the quality of living 2008 ranking in order to compare them from one year to the next.

Mercer evaluates local living conditions in all the 420 cities it surveys worldwide. Living conditions are analysed according to 39 factors, grouped in 10 categories:
* Political and social environment (political stability, crime, law enforcement, etc)
* Economic environment (currency exchange regulations, banking services, etc)
* Socio-cultural environment (censorship, limitations on personal freedom, etc)
* Health and sanitation (medical supplies and services, infectious diseases, sewage, waste disposal, air pollution, etc)
* Schools and education (standard and availability of international schools, etc)
* Public services and transportation (electricity, water, public transport, traffic congestion, etc)
* Recreation (restaurants, theatres, cinemas, sports and leisure, etc)
* Consumer goods (availability of food/daily consumption items, cars, etc)
* Housing (housing, household appliances, furniture, maintenance services, etc)
* Natural environment (climate, record of natural disasters)

The scores attributed to each factor allow for city-to-city comparisons to be made. The result is a Quality of Living Index, which compares the relative differences between any two locations. For the indices to be used in a practical manner, Mercer has created a grid that allows companies to link the resulting index to a Quality of Living Allowance amount by recommending a percentage value in relation to the index.

The World Mayor Project is seeking outstanding mayors for the 2010 Prize


World Mayor 2010:
Is your mayor
among the best?

City Mayors, the international think tank on urban affairs, is seeking nominations for the 2010 World Mayor Prize. The Prize, which has been awarded since 2004, honours mayors with the vision, passion and skills to make their cities incredible places to live in, work in and visit. The World Mayor Project aims to show what outstanding mayors can achieve and raise their profiles nationally and internationally.

The organisers of the World Mayor Project are looking for city leaders who excel in qualities like: leadership and vision, management abilities and integrity, social and economic awareness, ability to provide security and to protect the environment as well as the will and ability to foster good relations between communities from different cultural, racial and social backgrounds.
If you think your mayor is among the best in the world, nominate him or her now


Previous winners
and runner-ups
:

In 2004: Winner: Edi Rama (Tirana); Runner-up: Andrés Manuel López Obrador (Mexico City}; In third place - Walter Veltroni (Rome)
In 2005: Winner – Dora Bakoyannis (Athens); Runner-up - Hazel McCallion (Mississauga); In third place - Alvaro Arzú (Guatemala City)
In 2006: Winner – John So (Melbourne); Runner up – Job Cohen (Amsterdam); In third place - Stephen Reed (Harrisburg)
In 2008: Winner – Helen Zille (Cape Town); Runner up - Elmar Ledergerber (Zurich); In third place - Leopoldo López (Chacao)
More


Currency movements main factor in deciding
ranking of most expensive cities in the world

A review of Mercer Consulting's Cost of Living Survey

7 July 2009: Tokyo has replaced Moscow as the most expensive city in the world for US expatriates according to the latest Cost of Living Survey from Mercer. Osaka is in second position, up nine places since last year, whereas Moscow is now in third place. Geneva climbs four places to fourth position and Hong Kong moves up one to reach fifth. Johannesburg has replaced Asunción in Paraguay as the least expensive city in the ranking. Similar research by ECA International puts Luanda (Angola) first, with Tokyo second. A report published by the Swiss Bank UBS says Oslo was the world's most expensive city, followed by Zurich and Copenhagen.

The fundamental flaw of all cost surveys is that they convert local prices into US dollars, which means that any changes are as much the result of currency fluctuations as of price inflation. In surveys by ECA, UBS, Mercer and EIU the cost of living in cities outside the US dollar zone becomes more expensive if the dollar weakens against local currencies even when prices remain unchanged or indeed fall. A good example are cities in the United Kingdom. During the past two years the pound sterling has both weakened against the US dollar and the euro - from $2.1 to $1.6 and from €1.5 to €1.16. Therefore London and other British cities have become considerably less expensive for anyone travelling to the UK from Europe or the US, while at the same time the cost of many imported items, including gas and oil, increased due to the diminished purchasing power of the pound.

In Mercer’s 2009 survey, New York is used as the base city for the index and scores 100 points, all cities are compared against New York and currency movements are measured against the US dollar. Tokyo scores 143.7 points and is nearly three times as costly as Johannesburg with an index score of 49.6. The survey covers 143 cities across six continents and measures the comparative cost of over 200 items in each location, including housing, transport, food, clothing, household goods and entertainment.

The world's most expensive big cities
(The index is based on cost of living expressed in US dollars. Therefore, if the dollar weakens against the local currency of a city, the city becomes more expensive and moves up the index, even if prices expressed in local currency remain the same or even go down.)

Rank 2009
Rank 2008
City
Country
Score 2009
Score 2008
1
2
Tokyo Japan
143.7
127
2
11
Osaka Japan
119.2
110
3
1
Moscow Russia
115.4
142.4
4
8
Geneva Switzerland
109.2
115.8
5
6
Hong Kong Hong Kong
108.7
117.6
6
9
Zurich Switzerland
105.2
112.7
7
7
Copenhagen Denmark
105.0
117.2
8
22
New York City USA
100.0
100.0
9
20
Beijing China
99.6
101.9
10
13
Singapore Singapore
98.0
111.3
11
10
Milan Italy
96.9
98.3
12
24
Shanghai China
95.2
109.4
13
12
Paris France
95.1
118.3
14
4
Oslo Norway
94.2
79.3
15
89
Caracas Venezuela
93.3
125
16
3
London UK
92.7
105
17
14
Tel Aviv Israel
91.9
103.9
18
16
Rome Italy
91.2
101.1
19
21
Helsinki Finland
90.5
89.3
20
52
Dubai UAE
90.1
102.3
21
19
Vienna Austria
89.3
86.3
22
61
Shenzhen China
89.0
87.5
=23
55
Los Angeles USA
87.6
83.9
=23
70
Guangzhou China
87.6
103.9
25
16
Dublin Ireland
87.4
85.7
26
65
Abu Dhabi UAE
86.7
95.1
27
34
Douala Cameroun
86.1
97
28
25
Athens Greece
85.9
97
29
25
Amsterdam Netherland
85.7
90.6
30
45
Bratislava Slovakia
84.8
79.3
31
89
White Plains USA
84.7
95.9
32
30
Lagos Nigeria
84.6
82.2
33
74
Tehran Iran
84.1
89.6
=34
51
Abidjan Ivory Coast
82.5
92.2
=34
41
Dakar Senegal
82.5
81
=34
78
San Francisco USA
82.5
96.7
37
28
Madrid Spain
82.1
91.3
=38
43
Luxembourg Luxembourg
82.1
95.2
=38
31
Barcelona Spain
82.1
86.8
40
57
Algiers Algeria
81.7
81.4
=41
77
Honolulu USA
81.6
92.9
=41
39
Brussels Belgium
81.6
80.8
=41
80
Beirut Lebanon
81.6
90.7
44
44
Almaty Kazakhstan
81.5
82
45
75
Miami USA
81.4
103.1
46
18
St Petersburg Russia
81.3
93.1
47
37
Munich Germany
81.2
92.5
48
40
Frankfurt Germany
80.9
93
49
38
Berlin Germany
80.8
80.3
50
84
Chicago USA
80.7
117.7
Research by Mercer Consulting

Similar research by other organisations:
| ECA's most expensive cities | UBS' most expensive cities | EIU's most expensive cities |


Mercer's 2009 Cost of Living Survey
A significant reshuffle of cities can be observed in this year’s ranking, mainly due to considerable currency fluctuations worldwide. The majority of European cities moved down in the ranking with Warsaw experiencing the most dramatic change, plummeting 78 places from 35th to 113th. London and Oslo, both previously in the top 10, have dropped 13 and 10 places respectively. The same trend can be seen in Australia, New Zealand and India. Sydney has dropped 51 places from 15th to 66th and Mumbai has slipped down to 66th from 48th place.

Cities in the US, China, Japan and the Middle East have surged in the ranking. New York is a new entry in the top 10, jumping from 22nd to 8th place, and so is Beijing, now in 9th place, up from 20th in 2008. Japan now has two cities in the top 10 and Dubai has climbed 32 places to reach 20th.

Europe
In third place and with an index score of 115.4, Moscow remains the most expensive city in Europe for expatriates. However, a dramatic depreciation of the rouble against the US dollar has led to a sharp fall in the city’s index score compared to 2008 (142.4). Accommodation costs also started to decrease at the end of last year after a sharp increase in the first part of 2008. The next European cities in the ranking are Geneva and Zurich in fourth and sixth place, up from eight and ninth respectively. Copenhagen remains in seventh, and both Milan and Paris drop one place to 11th and 13th.

European cities have experienced some of this year’s steepest falls in the ranking, with Warsaw plummeting from 35th to 113th and Glasgow (129th place) and Birmingham (125th place) in the UK falling 60 and 59 places respectively. German and Spanish cities all fell between eight and 11 places, whereas cities in Sweden, Ukraine, Czech Republic, Romania and Hungary all fell between 36 and 48 places.

Oslo and London, both previously in the top 10, are now in 14th and 16th place respectively. “The decline of rental prices both in Oslo and London, coupled with the fall in the value of British pound and Norwegian krone against the US dollar, have caused these cities to plummet in the ranking,” said Ms Constantin-Métral.

The Middle East
While the vast majority of European cities have fallen in the ranking, most Middle Eastern cities have experienced a reverse trend. Both Dubai and Abu Dhabi have risen significantly in the ranking, moving from 52nd to 20th and 65th to 26th respectively. This is mainly due to the UAE dirham being fixed to the US dollar. Tel Aviv remains the most expensive city in the Middle East, although it is the only one in the region to move down in the ranking, from 14th to 17th.

Africa
Most African cities moved up in this year’s ranking, although their index scores have decreased. Cairo jumps a substantial 44 places to 57th as the Egyptian pound fared well against the US dollar. The sharp decrease of the South African rand against the US dollar has caused Johannesburg to slip to bottom position.

The US and Canada
Due to the strengthening of the US dollar, all cities in the US have experienced a rise in this year’s ranking. New York remains the highest ranking city in the region and has also joined the global top 10 list this year, jumping from 22nd to eighth place. Los Angeles is up 32 places to 23rd and Washington is up 41 places to 66th. Canadian cities have slipped down the index with its highest ranking city Toronto down 31 places to 85th. Ottawa drops 36 places to 121st and Montreal is now in 103rd place, down from 72nd in 2008.

Latin America
In 15th place and up 74 places from 2008, Caracas in Venezuela is the top ranking city in South America. Sao Paolo and Rio de Janeiro have experienced a reverse move, plummeting from 25th to 72nd and 31st to 73rd respectively, Similarly, Bogota has moved down from 87th to 120th place. Buenos Aires has climbed 26 to reach 112th place. “Although the Argentine peso has lost value against the US dollar, the high inflation rate observed on goods and services have caused Buenos Aires to rise in the rankings,” said Ms Constantin-Métral.

Asia
Tokyo moves up one place in the ranking to become the most expensive city for expatriates both in Asia and globally. The Japanese yen has strengthened considerably against the US dollar which also lifts Osaka into second place from 11th in 2008. Hong Kong follows in fifth place and Singapore has moved up three places to reach 10th. In 140th place, Karachi continues to be the least costly city in this region – up one place from last year.

The Indian rupee made a significant loss against the US dollar last year and all the Indian cities have moved down the ranking as a consequence. New Delhi moves from 55th to 65th place and Mumbai drops from 48th to 66th.

Chinese cities experienced the reverse effect as the Chinese renminbi performed relatively strongly compared to most other currencies. Beijing is in ninth place, having moved up 11 places to join the global top 10. Shanghai, Shenzhen and Guangzhou follow in 12th, 22nd and 23rd place respectively.

Australia and New Zealand
Cities in this region have taken a significant plunge in the ranking following a dramatic depreciation of the Australian and New Zealand dollars against the US dollar. Sydney remains the most expensive city for expatriates in this region but has dropped from 15th to 66th. Melbourne follows in 92nd, down from 36th. Auckland has moved down to 138th place from 78th and Wellington follows in 139th down from 93rd.

Methodology
The figures for Mercer’s cost of living and rental accommodation costs comparisons are based on a survey conducted in March 2009. The 2009 comparisons are based on a similar survey conducted in March 2008. The information is used by governments and major companies to protect the purchasing power of their employees when transferred abroad; rental accommodation costs data is used to assess local expatriate housing allowances. The choice of cities surveyed is based on the demand for corresponding data from companies and governmental organizations.

 

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TRAITOR McCain

jewn McCain

ASSASSIN of JFK, Patton, many other Whites

killed 264 MILLION Christians in WWII

killed 64 million Christians in Russia

holocaust denier extraordinaire--denying the Armenian holocaust

millions dead in the Middle East

tens of millions of dead Christians

LOST $1.2 TRILLION in Pentagon
spearheaded torture & sodomy of all non-jews
millions dead in Iraq

42 dead, mass murderer Goldman LOVED by jews

serial killer of 13 Christians

the REAL terrorists--not a single one is an Arab

serial killers are all jews

framed Christians for anti-semitism, got caught
left 350 firemen behind to die in WTC

legally insane debarred lawyer CENSORED free speech

mother of all fnazis, certified mentally ill

10,000 Whites DEAD from one jew LIE

moser HATED by jews: he followed the law

f.ck Jesus--from a "news" person!!

1000 fold the child of perdition

 

Modified Friday, February 26, 2010

Copyright @ 2007 by Fathers' Manifesto & Christian Party