Forum

Donate

Search

Subscribe

jews/911

Feedback

dna

RCC

AIDS

Home

Fathers

Surveys

Holocaust

IQ

14th Amdt

19th Amdt

Israelites

NWO

Homicide

Blacks

Whites

Signatory

Talmud

Watchman

Gaelic

TRAITORS

Medicine?

Two people were murdered in North Dakota last year. They were stabbed.

 

No one was shot.

 

<<< Then again, criminals have a strong reputation for disobeying the law, so it's by far more likely that a criminal will use this government issued weapon to attack someone than a law-abiding citizen to keep it handy to be used illegally for self-defense if you think about this carefully.  After all, the military is not exactly free of criminals itself, correct?  Isn't that why the military has a military police, a JAG, court martials, and military lock-ups?  >>>, Cougar Den [mailto:CougarDen@msn.com

 

 

The convoluted logic here is what prevents many from comprehending the issue.

 

Let�s use a'simple'example'to show why it is NOT true that �it's by far more likely that a criminal will use this government issued weapon to attack someone than a law-abiding citizen to keep it handy to be used illegally for self-defense�, namely North Dakota whose murder rate is on par with Switzerland [AND with Singapore, AND with the Republic of Ireland, AND with Saudi Arabia, AND with Qatar, so it�s not an oddball example].

 

North Dakota, with a population equivalent to Washington, DC, had TWO murders last year [compared to 482 in DC in 1991].   There are 306,735 gun owners in North Dakota compared to only 22,914 in DC.  NONE of the 306,735 guns in North Dakota were used to murder someone, because both murder victims there were STABBED, whereas firearms were used in 161 of the murders in DC AND firearms were NOT used in 321 of those murders.

 

POINT ONE: none of the 306,735 guns in North Dakota were used by criminals�but MANY of them were used BY �a law-abiding citizen to keep it handy to be used illegally for self-defense�.

 

POINT TWO: guns were NOT used in MOST of the murders in DC, where you were twice as likely to be murdered in some OTHER way than by a gun [and four HUNDRED times as likely to be murdered as in Singapore].

 

POINT THREE: the evidence shows that if DC had had MORE guns, there would have been MORE guns used for self defense, and there would have been FEWER MURDERS.

 

In order to make a comparison, however, between the use of firearms to murder someone, let's compare the RATE in North Dakota in 2005 [so we don't divide by zero] when ONE gun was used in ONE murder [1 murder / 306,735 guns = .33 murders per 100,000 guns ] to the RATE in DC [161 gun murders / 22,914 guns = 703 murders per 100,000 guns]. 

 

Are guns manufactured or sold in Washington, DC, REALLY 2,130 TIMES more deadly than those in North Dakota?

 

Of course not.

 

If this was a zero sum game, and *if* you COULD have eliminated ALL of the 161 gun murders in DC by removing ALL of the guns, and IF the OTHER 321 non-gun-related murders didn't INCREASE [a mathematical impossibility], you STILL would have had 321 TIMES as many murders in DC as in North Dakota, and per capita as in Singapore, and in Saudi Arabia, and in the Republic of Ireland, and in Qatar.

 

Nigger control works.  Gun control doesn't.  That's what our politicians DC figured out, and that's how they FINALLY got off the top of the Murder Capitol of the WORLD list, but not by much, even to this day.

To add to the confusion, the attorney general of North Dakota, Stenehjem, made the following claim which seems to dispute the US Statistical Abstract which claims there was only one murder in 1994:

"Stenehjem says North Dakota averages about 11 homicides annually for the past several years, after a high of 22 in 1993. 16 were reported last year."

 


 

Gun Control Laws Didn't Stop These Two Murders In North Dakota

todd_jarret_limited_edition_40_caliberTwo people in North Dakota lost their lives. Out of the fifty states, The Brady Campaign rates North Dakota fourty-fourth in gun control laws.

  • No state restriction on the sale or possession of military-style semiautomatic assault weapons. Assault weapons are as easy to buy as hunting rifles.

    That should be on the recruiting literature. Come to North Dakota, where assault weapons are as easy to buy as hunting rifles.

  • No state requirement that handgun buyers obtain a handgun license or undergo any type of safety training prior to buying a handgun.

    My goodness. People just running around with guns, oblivious to what they are holding.

  • No state requirement that gun owners register their firearms. Police do not know how many guns are in the state or where they are.

    Like that's a bad thing?

  • No state restriction on the sale of Saturday night specials or "junk" handguns.

    "Junk" is gun grabber code for "affordable."

  • The state does allow the use of deadly force as a first resort in public. This dangerous law permits the average citizen to bypass our entire justice system by permitting him or her to assume the role of police officer, prosecutor, judge, and executioner.

    Deadly force is authorized as a first response IN PUBLIC! Another line in the brochure.

Two people were murdered in North Dakota last year. They were stabbed.

No one was shot.

According to this graph, a little more than fifty percent of North Dakotans own a gun. Half the state's population: nobody shot.

For the record, Washington, D.C. has some of the strictest gun laws in the country and the fewest legal gun owners. Guess where they stand in number of homicides with a firearm. They are #1.

Hat Tip: House of Eratosthenes, who got it from The Blogfather, who found it on Say Uncle

 

 

2009 Montana Legislature

 

Seal

HOUSE BILL NO. 246

INTRODUCED BY J. BONIEK, BENNETT, BUTCHER, CURTISS, RANDALL, WARBURTON

 

AN ACT EXEMPTING FROM FEDERAL REGULATION UNDER THE COMMERCE CLAUSE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES A FIREARM, A FIREARM ACCESSORY, OR AMMUNITION MANUFACTURED AND RETAINED IN MONTANA; AND PROVIDING AN APPLICABILITY DATE.

 

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MONTANA:

 

     Section 1.  Short title. [Sections 1 through 6] may be cited as the "Montana Firearms Freedom Act".

 

     Section 2.  Legislative declarations of authority. The legislature declares that the authority for [sections 1 through 6] is the following:

     (1) The 10th amendment to the United States constitution guarantees to the states and their people all powers not granted to the federal government elsewhere in the constitution and reserves to the state and people of Montana certain powers as they were understood at the time that Montana was admitted to statehood in 1889. The guaranty of those powers is a matter of contract between the state and people of Montana and the United States as of the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Montana and the United States in 1889.

     (2) The ninth amendment to the United States constitution guarantees to the people rights not granted in the constitution and reserves to the people of Montana certain rights as they were understood at the time that Montana was admitted to statehood in 1889. The guaranty of those rights is a matter of contract between the state and people of Montana and the United States as of the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Montana and the United States in 1889.

     (3) The regulation of intrastate commerce is vested in the states under the 9th and 10th amendments to the United States constitution, particularly if not expressly preempted by federal law. Congress has not expressly preempted state regulation of intrastate commerce pertaining to the manufacture on an intrastate basis of firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition.

     (4) The second amendment to the United States constitution reserves to the people the right to keep and bear arms as that right was understood at the time that Montana was admitted to statehood in 1889, and the guaranty of the right is a matter of contract between the state and people of Montana and the United States as of the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Montana and the United States in 1889.

     (5) Article II, section 12, of the Montana constitution clearly secures to Montana citizens, and prohibits government interference with, the right of individual Montana citizens to keep and bear arms. This constitutional protection is unchanged from the 1889 Montana constitution, which was approved by congress and the people of Montana, and the right exists as it was understood at the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Montana and the United States in 1889.

 

     Section 3.  Definitions. As used in [sections 1 through 6], the following definitions apply:

     (1) "Borders of Montana" means the boundaries of Montana described in Article I, section 1, of the 1889 Montana constitution.

     (2) "Firearms accessories" means items that are used in conjunction with or mounted upon a firearm but are not essential to the basic function of a firearm, including but not limited to telescopic or laser sights, magazines, flash or sound suppressors, folding or aftermarket stocks and grips, speedloaders, ammunition carriers, and lights for target illumination.

     (3) "Generic and insignificant parts" includes but is not limited to springs, screws, nuts, and pins.

     (4) "Manufactured" means that a firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition has been created from basic materials for functional usefulness, including but not limited to forging, casting, machining, or other processes for working materials.

 

     Section 4.  Prohibitions. A personal firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition that is manufactured commercially or privately in Montana and that remains within the borders of Montana is not subject to federal law or federal regulation, including registration, under the authority of congress to regulate interstate commerce. It is declared by the legislature that those items have not traveled in interstate commerce. This section applies to a firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition that is manufactured in Montana from basic materials and that can be manufactured without the inclusion of any significant parts imported from another state. Generic and insignificant parts that have other manufacturing or consumer product applications are not firearms, firearms accessories, or ammunition, and their importation into Montana and incorporation into a firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition manufactured in Montana does not subject the firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition to federal regulation. It is declared by the legislature that basic materials, such as unmachined steel and unshaped wood, are not firearms, firearms accessories, or ammunition and are not subject to congressional authority to regulate firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition under interstate commerce as if they were actually firearms, firearms accessories, or ammunition. The authority of congress to regulate interstate commerce in basic materials does not include authority to regulate firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition made in Montana from those materials. Firearms accessories that are imported into Montana from another state and that are subject to federal regulation as being in interstate commerce do not subject a firearm to federal regulation under interstate commerce because they are attached to or used in conjunction with a firearm in Montana.

 

     Section 5.  Exceptions. [Section 4] does not apply to:

     (1) a firearm that cannot be carried and used by one person;

     (2) a firearm that has a bore diameter greater than 1 1/2 inches and that uses smokeless powder, not black powder, as a propellant;

     (3) ammunition with a projectile that explodes using an explosion of chemical energy after the projectile leaves the firearm; or

     (4) a firearm that discharges two or more projectiles with one activation of the trigger or other firing device.

 

     Section 6.  Marketing of firearms. A firearm manufactured or sold in Montana under [sections 1 through 6] must have the words "Made in Montana" clearly stamped on a central metallic part, such as the receiver or frame.

 

     Section 7.  Codification instruction. [Sections 1 through 6] are intended to be codified as an integral part of Title 30, and the provisions of Title 30 apply to [sections 1 through 6].

 

     Section 8.  Applicability. [This act] applies to firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition that are manufactured, as defined in [section 3], and retained in Montana after October 1, 2009.

- END -

 


Latest Version of HB 246 (HB0246.ENR)
Processed for the Web on April 3, 2009 (11:03am)

New language in a bill appears underlined, deleted material appears stricken.

Sponsor names are handwritten on introduced bills, hence do not appear on the bill until it is reprinted.

See the status of this bill for the bill's primary sponsor.

 


 

Search for:

 

Hit Counter

 

TRAITOR McCain

jewn McCain

ASSASSIN of JFK, Patton, many other Whites

killed 264 MILLION Christians in WWII

killed 64 million Christians in Russia

holocaust denier extraordinaire--denying the Armenian holocaust

millions dead in the Middle East

tens of millions of dead Christians

LOST $1.2 TRILLION in Pentagon
spearheaded torture & sodomy of all non-jews
millions dead in Iraq

42 dead, mass murderer Goldman LOVED by jews

serial killer of 13 Christians

the REAL terrorists--not a single one is an Arab

serial killers are all jews

framed Christians for anti-semitism, got caught
left 350 firemen behind to die in WTC

legally insane debarred lawyer CENSORED free speech

mother of all fnazis, certified mentally ill

10,000 Whites DEAD from one jew LIE

moser HATED by jews: he followed the law

f.ck Jesus--from a "news" person!!

1000 fold the child of perdition

 

Modified Thursday, December 24, 2009

Copyright @ 2007 by Fathers' Manifesto & Christian Party