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Medicine?

 

Mongolian Spot

 

Regarding Mongolian spots as an indicator of racial purity, or racial impurity, someone wrote:

"Check European history -- the Mongols were defeated decisively at Chalon France....and left behind a good bit of DNA during their stay, I'm sure....all the way back and forth across Eurasia. Sort of turns that 'racial purity' thing on its head :)"

The critical point this writer seemed to gloss over is that any DNA the Mongolians did leave behind is STILL imprinted on the behinds of ALL descendant of theirs.

iow, this proves that children born without the Mongolian Spot are NOT descendants of Genghis Khan and his Mongol cohorts.

 

 

http://www.planetkyoto.com/nils/archives/000066.html

My husband is 100% German, and I am English/German/Danish with one great-great aunt who was Iroquois. Our youngest son has a patch of Mongolian blue spot above his buttocks that puzzled us greatly until his pediatrician explained the Native American/Asian connection to us.

[If her great-great aunt was an Iroquois, so was her great-great-grandmoter.  It sounds like the story of her Iroquois ancestry was changed from great-great-grandmother to great-great-aunt to deflect attention from her Indian ancestry].

It is not just a Korean and Mongolian thing although Koreans like to think that. For some strange reason, they like to link themselves to the past militaristic glory of the mongols and they use this mongolian spot as proof. I am 100% chinese and both my sister and I had the mongolian spot as do about 95% of chinese people.

[But China was conquered by Mongolia, Genghis Kahn moved his capitol city to Beijing, so Chinese today ARE descendants of the Mongolians].

 

Posted by: Zhong Guo on May 10, 2004 11:46 AM

im from the uk, my mother is irish and so is her family as far as ive looked. My dad is English and so is his family. I asked around and i dont have any asian blood but i was born with a mongolian blue spot, which is a bit weird. I heard about a small area in France where nearly all the kids are born with them. I guess the genes must reach across a lot of generations, but who knows?? Anyway mine disapeared after a few years.

Posted by: owen on May 13, 2004 07:25 PM

Check European history -- the Mongols were defeated decisively at Chalon France....and left behind a good bit of DNA during their stay, I'm sure....all the way back and forth across Eurasia. Sort of turns that 'racial purity' thing on its head :)

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http://www.mediatinker.com/blog/archives/007309.html

Mongolian blue spot

Until today, I’d never seen a naked Japanese baby.

But we were invited to dinner at a friends’ house this evening and got an entertaining bonus—admission to the daily bath. Our friends’ son is such a cutie and so patient as his mama washed his hair and baba held his legs. Junior thinks he’s swimming in his tub and kicks like crazy.

And I learned something interesting from this bathing 6-month old. Many Japanese babies are born with a blue birthmark in the “sacral region.” It looks like an ink blot or a dark bruise. But it’s not a bruise and it fades with a few years. His is just at the end of the tailbone.

Apparently this Mongolian Blue Spot is a genetic marker traced back to the Mongols and it appears not only in most Asian races, but also Turks, Greeks, Africans, Eskimos and Native Americans.

I’ve uncovered two folk explanations for the spots. The Mongols say they are the mark left by the spirit who slaps the baby to life. Chinese believe that if you are reluctant to be reincarnated, the King of Hell prods and kicks you until you agree to go. The more spots, the more reluctant you were to be reborn.

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http://birthmarks-the-spot.info/Mongolian-birthmark.html

Mongolian birthmark

A mongolian birthmark, also known as blue spots, are common among darker skinned races, such as Asian, East Indian, African and Hispanic. They are flat, pigmented lesions with nebulous borders and irregular shape. The mongolian birthmark are benign skin markings which appear commonly at the base of the spine, on the buttocks or back, as well as the shoulders. The mongolian birthmark can occasionally be mistaken for bruises and embarrassing child abuse theories have been known to arise.

The mongolian birthmark is flat, can be deep brown, slate gray, or blue-black in colour, with edges often, but not always, indistinct. They vary from the size of a pinhead to six inches or more across. At least one mongolian birthmark is present on over 90% of Native Americans and people of African descent, over 80% of Asians, and over 70% of Hispanics. The mongolian birthmark is nothing more than a dense collections of melanocytes, the skin cells which contain melanin, the normal pigment of the skin. When the melanocytes are close to the surface, they look deep brown. The deeper they are in the skin, the more bluish they look.

The mongolian birthmark is present at birth and fades by the age of two. Most have completely disappeared by the age of five. If the mongolian birthmark remains at the onset of puberty, they are likely to be permanent, but fewer than 5% of children with a mongolian birthmark still have them by adulthood. Those who do tend to be the ones with multiple, widespread blue spots, or with blue spots in unusual locations.

mongolian_spot_sm.jpg (2406 bytes)

mongolianspot2.jpg (5733 bytes)

mongolianspot.jpg (58482 bytes)

 

 

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http://boards.ancestry.com/topics.medical.born-20-with-20-a-20-birth-20-mark/100.1.1/mb.ashx

My wife is Filipino and we have two kids between us. They both had a blue "bruise" under the skin from the lower back to the buttocks from the time they were born untill over a year old. This mark is very dominant, since I am not Oriental. It went away with time, a few months after taking the child off of the bottle and onto regular food. This is quite common in Oriental children. It is sometimes called a Mongolian birth mark. Alot of Oriental babies have it and years ago, before being properly educated on the subject, health care workers (in North America) during regular checkups would accuse the parents of child abuse because they thought the bruising was from excessive spanking. Some Oriental parents lost their kids for a time while the authorities investigated before realizing the marks were natural. Now, thank God, health care workers are better educated on the subject and are made aware of these marks. Still, whenever I had someone new to babysit our kids, we had to make them aware that these marks were natural and not abuse. We had to be cautious and reassure the babysitter they could check with the local health centre on this subject if they were unsure.

 

Modified Friday, April 26, 2013

Copyright @ 2007 by Fathers' Manifesto & Christian Party