The most revealing look at the state of the nation’s education system, besides international tests like TIMSS and PISA which proved we scored DEAD LAST in the industrialized world [and even compared to many non-industrialized nations], is a state to state comparison of TWELFTH GRADE math and science scores, which is PRECISELY what no-presidents-left-behind like Bush CONCEAL from us.

If we HAD this data—WE WOULD *KNOW* THAT NCLB IS A FRAUD AND A FAILURE!!

I DETEST mis-statements and errors and LIES from our so-called educators, like the following one:

PISA 2003 Assessments of Mathematics and Science Literacy of 15-Year-Olds

Although TIMSS measures how well students have mastered the mathematical and scientific content presented in school, PISA assesses students' literacy in these subjects (Lemke et al. 2004). PISA uses the term literacy to denote the program's goal of assessing how well students can apply their knowledge and skills to problems they might encounter, particularly in situations outside of a classroom.

In 2003, U.S. 15-year-olds performed below the OECD average in both mathematics and science literacy (appendix tables 1-13 Excel table.and 1-14 Excel table.).[23] Among OECD nations, U.S. students were near the bottom in mathematics literacy, outperformed by students in Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, South Korea, Japan, and 14 other countries (table 1-5 table.; appendix table1-13 Excel table.). The United States was at rough parity with Hungary, Poland, and Spain, and scored higher than Greece, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, and Turkey. In science, average literacy scores were higher in 15 other OECD countries compared with the United States and lower in 6 (table 1-6 table.; appendix table1-14 Excel table.).

The CORRECT and HONEST and TRUTHFUL way to word that last paragraph is as follows:

“In 2003, U.S. 15-year-olds performed significantly below the OECD average in both mathematics and science literacy (appendix tables 1-13 Excel table.and 1-14 Excel table.).[23] Among 29 industrialized OECD nations, only Russian students scored lower than U.S. students and only ten non-industrialized nations scored lower (table 1-5 table.; appendix table1-13 Excel table.). Even Hungary, Poland, and Spain scored higher than the United States who was at rough parity with non-industrialized nations Greece, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, and Turkey. In science, our average literacy scores were significantly lower than 15 other OECD countries.  Only one of thirty industrialized nations, Norway, and the ten non-industrialized nations, scored significantly lower (table 1-6 table.; appendix table1-14 Excel table.).

 

If you take the time to read their own references, you’ll see that even THAT statement is being too kind to our educators who are obviously on the defensive about their COLOSSAL FAILURE.  NOBODY on the planet spends more and gets LESS in “education”.  To REALLY be accurate and honest, the following is the statement that a government concerned about its own people would publicize from the rooftops:

“In 2003, the average U.S. 15-year-old performed significantly below the OECD average in both mathematics and science literacy (appendix tables 1-13 Excel table.and 1-14 Excel table.).[23] Among 29 industrialized OECD nations, only Russian students scored lower than U.S. students and only ten non-industrialized nations scored lower (table 1-5 table.; appendix table1-13 Excel table.). Even Hungary, Poland, and Spain scored higher than the United States who was at rough parity with non-industrialized nations Greece, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, and Turkey. In science, our average literacy scores were significantly lower than 15 other OECD countries.  Only one of thirty industrialized nations, Norway, and the ten non-industrialized nations, scored significantly lower in science (table 1-6 table.; appendix table1-14 Excel table.). When broken down by race in both science and math, American Whites scored slightly higher than Finland [545 in math, 549 in science], Indians and Hispanics scored slightly lower than Mexico [384 in math, 404 in science], Asians scored slightly lower than Korea [540 in math, 535 in science], Blacks scored significantly lower than Tunisia [339 in math, 365 in science], and jews scored slightly lower than Israel [400 in math, 380 in science].

 

 

 

 

May 24, 2006

2005 NAEP Science Scores Point to Mixed Progress 

NEA President Calls Scores 'Mostly Disappointing' Due to Problems with NCLB 

WASHINGTON -- Results of the 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress in science released today reaffirm that narrowing curriculums can have adverse academic effects.  The increased emphasis on No Child Left Behind has forced school districts to discontinue programs and cut time spent on sciences, social studies, arts and other subjects that provide students with a well-rounded education.

“The NAEP scores are mostly disappointing and indicate some of the problems with the No Child Left Behind law,” said Reg Weaver, president of the National Education Association.  “Schools are moving toward a one-size-fits-all, teach-to-the-test approach that leaves our children without the necessary skills to thrive in a global society.  If we continue to neglect the cornerstone subjects, like science, our children will not be able to compete in the future.”

The NAEP results reveal that test scores are up for fourth-graders, and eighth-graders showed no overall improvement.  Although the average scores for 12th-grade students were not drastically different from 2000, they dropped from 1996.  The 2005 results show that achievement gaps between Black and Hispanic students and white students were narrowed slightly for fourth-graders.  However, the gap between white and Black 12th-graders grew larger over the same time period. 

Although NCLB mandates that states start testing in science in the 2007-08 school year, the results from such tests will not count toward Adequate Yearly Progress, which measures student achievement in reading/language arts and math.  Educators believe recent calls for the inclusion of science as part of AYP are ill-advised: adding science assessments to AYP will simply make it much more difficult for schools to meet AYP targets.  Independent studies already predict that more than 90 percent of public schools eventually will fail to meet federal standards and likely will face severe sanctions that hamper efforts to improve student achievement.

Pressure to meet these standards and a continued lack of resources are stumbling blocks for schools across the country.  NCLB has led many schools to all but eliminate science in many classrooms, as under-funded schools have been forced to divert resources to reading and math. 

“How can students be expected to meet science requirements without the benefit of appropriate classroom instruction in the subject?” asks Weaver.  “It’s shortsighted to push subjects to the back-burner when we need to provide students with a diverse curriculum for future success.  Until we make a commitment to delivering a balanced education to all our children, our schools will continue to struggle and our students will be left behind.”

Under NCLB, states are required to conduct NAEP assessments in reading and math every two years for fourth- and eighth-grade students.  State participation in the science assessment is voluntary.  Visit www.NEA.org for a list of key questions about NAEP and No Child Left Behind. 

To view the NAEP report: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard

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