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Palestine

See a child SHOT in the head by big, "brave" jews,

compliments of hamada_abd el wahab of Egypt

 

Dr. H. S. Linfield of the Bureau of Jewish Social Research estimated that in 1925 there were a total of 15,630 Jews in the world, of whom 110,101 lived in Palestine. This was reported in the 1930 World Almanac Book of Facts, published by the New York World, on page 752, at a time when the total population of Palestine was 848,232, of which 738,131 were non-Jews, and 10% of the population were Christians. Today only 2% are Christians, compared to more than 4% in Iran, 10% to 20% in Egypt, 10% in Syria, and 8% in Iraq.

In 1941 it was the same World Almanac and Book of Facts, this time published by the New York World-Telegram, which reported that the American Jewish Committee claimed there were 15,748,091 Jews in the world.

"According to Ottoman statistics studied by Justin McCarthy, the population of Palestine in the early 19th century was 350,000, in 1860 it was 411,000 and in 1900 about 600,000 of which 94% were Arabs. In 1914 Palestine had a population of 657,000 Muslim Arabs, 81,000 Christian Arabs, and 59,000 Jews."

"The Church of the Holy Sepulchre in the background is venerated by Christians as the site of the Burial of Jesus. Arab Christian cemetery in Haifa. Christianity in Israel is one of the recognized religions in Israel and is practised by more than 161,000 Israeli citizens (about 2.1% of population)."

Year
Jews
Non-Jews
Total Population
% Jewish
1517
5,000
295,000
~300,000
1.7%
1882
24,000
276,000
300,000
8.0%
1918
60,000
600,000
660,000
8.1%
1931
174,610
861,211
1,035,821
16.9%
1936
384,078
982,614
1,366,692
28.1%
1946
543,000
1,267,037
1,810,037
30.0%
1948
716,700
156,000
872,700
82.1%
1950
1,203,000
167,100
1,370,100
87.8%
1955
1,590,500
198,600
1,789,100
88.9%
1960
1,911,300
239,100
2,150,400
88.9%
1965
2,299,100
299,300
2,598,400
88.5%
1970
2,582,000
440,100
3,022,100
85.5%
1975
2,959,400
533,800
3,493,200
84.7%
1980
3,282,700
639,000
3,921,700
83.7%
1985
3,517,200
749,000
4,266,200
82.5%
1990
3,946,700
875,000
4,821,700
81.9%
1995
4,522,300
1,090,000
5,612,300
80.6%
2000
4,955,400
1,413,900
6,369,300
77.8%
2005
5,313,800
1,676,900
6,990,700
76.0%
2010
5,802,900
1,892,200
7,695,100
75.4%
2013
6,042,000
1,967,000
8,018,000
75.4%
2014
6,102,000
2,488,000
8,132,000
75.2%

"They were 8% in a population of 16.3 million in 1987 and 1.5 million in 2003 of 23 million. Since the 2003 Iraq war, Iraqi Christians have been relocated to Syria in significant but unknown numbers, but the current CIA Factbook from numbers suggests 0.8% Christians as Iraq's largest religion outside Islam."

"Of the Syrian population, 74% were Sunnis (including Sufis), whereas 13% were Shias (including 8.0% Alawites from which about 2% are called Mershdis and they are the followers of Sulayman al-Murshid, 3% Twelvers , or 1% Ismailis ), 3% were Druze, while the remaining 10%were Christians."

 

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The definition of "Palestine" in the Encyclopedia Britannica differs greatly from the one in the Holy Bible, in that the Holy Bible continuously refers to a race called "Israelites" [read: "the lost sheep of the house of Israel" per Jesus Christ, or the descendants of Israel/Jacob].   This term is not even used in this encyclopedia's definition of Palestine, yet Israelites were the primary residents of that land for millennia.  This would be like describing the United States of America and forgetting to mention that White European men once inhabited this land--except that White European men have inhabited America for only 500 years, compared to the more than 4,000 years that Israelites have inhabited Palestine [read: Israel].

 


From Encyclopedia Britannica:


Palestine,

The name of a territory on the
eastern Mediterranean coast, occupied in bib-
lical times by the kingdoms of Israel and
Judah and, in the 20th century, the scene of
conflicting claims between Jewish and Arab
national movements. Also called the Holy
Land, it is sacred in varying degrees to Juda-
ism, Christianity, and Islam. For Judaism,
Palestine, called Erez Yisra'el (Land of Isra-
el), has traditionally been the land promised
by God, a uniquely sacred place, and the seat
of national independence. For Christianity, it
is the scene of the life and ministry of Jesus
and the Apostles, with especially revered
places. For Islam, certain sites, associated
with the Prophet Muhammad, are holy
places. A local Palestinian Arab nationalism
has developed during the period of the Zionist
settlement (see Zionism) and especially since
the establishment of the State of Israel; it
claims Palestine as the homeland and domain
of the Arab peoples who have inhabited it
since the Muslim conquest in the 7th century.
The name Palestine is derived from the
Greek Palaistina, which comes from the He-
brew Pleshet (Land of the Philistines), a small
coastal area northeast of Egypt, also called
Philistia. The Romans used the term Syria
Palaestina in the 2nd century BC for the south-
ern third of the province of Syria, including
the former Judea. The name Palestine was
revived as an official title when the British
were given a mandate (restricted to the terri-
tory west of the Jordan River) after World
War II.

Palestine's frontiers have fluctuated widely
throughout history, but it has usually em-
braced the territory from the Mediterranean
and the coastal plain (west), through the tran-
sitional zone of ha-Shefela, to the hill country
of Judaea and Samaria (qq.v.), heartland of
the ancient Hebrew kingdoms. The Wilder-
ness of Judaea (Midbar Yehuda) slopes down
to the double-faulted graben (depressed sec-
tion) of the Jordan River Valley, the northern
section of the Great Rift Valley of Asia and
Africa. In the south is the Negev (q.v.), a dry,
rugged, now triangular area, with a southern
apex on the Gulf of Aqaba. In the north the
broad, now fertile Esdraelon Plain (q.v.) di-
vides Samaria (south) from the hill country of
Galilee (q.v.), the highest and best watered
part of Palestine as herein limited. In the east
of Galilee lie the harp-shaped Sea of Galilee
and the now drained Hula Valley (see Hula
'Emeg). Kings David and Solomon, however,
ruled (c. 1000) over a kingdom including
much of modem Lebanon and Syria, extend-
ing to the Euphrates River.

Palestine is a land of sharp contrasts in relief
and climate; only 14 mi (23 km) separate an
elevation of 2,694 ft (821 m) above sea level
north of Jerusalem from the shores of the
Dead Sea, 1,296 ft (395 m) below sea level
(lowest point on the Earth's surface). The
country has a moderate Mediterranean win-
ter-rainfall climate, but Tirat Zevi, in the
north Jordan Valley, more than 656 ft below
sea level, has recorded a maximum tempera-
ture of 131� F (54� C). From there Mt. Her-
mon (Arabic Jabal ash-Shaykh), 9,232 ft
(2,814 m) high, just across the border in mod-
ern Lebanon, is visible on a clear day.

Settled since early prehistoric times, Pales-
tine has been held by virtually every power of
the Near East, among them ancient Egypt,
Assyria, Babylonia, Persia, Alexander the
Great's empire and his successors, the Ptole-
mies and Seleucids, the Roman emperors,
the Byzantines, the Ummayads, 'Abbasids,
Fatimids, crusaders, Ayyubids, Mamluks,
and Ottoman Turks. After World War I, un-
der a mandate awarded to Britain by the
League of Nations, incorporating the Balfour
Declaration (q.v.) of Nov. 2, 1917, Britain
favourably viewed the establishment of a na-
tional home for the Jewish people in Palestine.
The declaration was approved by the princi-
pal Allied and Associated Powers, including
the U.S. (which had not joined the League of
Nations). Britain governed Palestine until
1948; its administration, however, satisfied

neither the majority Arabs nor the growing
Jewish population. After World War II the
British continued to enforce strict regulations
against Jewish immigration, despite the pres-
sures of the refugees from the Nazi holocaust.
Its position in Palestine grew untenable, and
the problem was turned over to the United
Nations, which recommended (Nov. 29, 1947)
the establishment of separate Arab and Jew-
ish states in Palestine. When the British left
(May 15, 1948), the State of Israel was pro-
claimed. The surrounding Arab countries then
made war on Israel and were defeated. Those
territories not under Israeli rule were either
annexed to Jordan (Judaea and Samaria) or
fell to Egypt (the Gaza Strip; q.v.). After the
Six-Day War (June 1967) those areas, plus
Egypt's Sinai Peninsula and Syria's Golan
Heights (q.v,), were placed under Israeli ad-
ministration. Sinai and the Golan Heights
became the scene of a new conflict in October
1973 between the Arab forces, led by Egypt
and Syria, and Israel. (See Middle East crisis
of 1973.) Major ref. 17:926f

•Ben-Gurion role in Israeli liberation 2:836f

•Churchill's 1922 white paper 4:597a

•Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan 10:270c

•Middle Eastern republic 9:1059b

• Romanesque architectural
developments 19:359g

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"Some call them radicals. Others call them the Opposition. President Clinton referred to them on various occasions as the "enemies of peace". Yet, for many Palestinians, they represent the non-compromising segment of the living conscience of Palestine. So before we rush to judge and condemn, before we describe them as radicals and enemies of peace, we must listen to their story. The story of suffering through Black September, South Lebanon and the Intifadah. Once we listen, I believe, all that we can do is to stand for them and salute, salute them for a heavy price they have paid, rather than those who took the easy way out." - Ramzy Baroud

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