xmas3.gif (5351 bytes)

 

 

Masking our Negative Personal Savings Rate

 

 

Negative 1% Personal Savings rate for 3 years.

 

Ten trillion dollar loss in Total Financial Assets in four years.

 

Four fold reduction in percent of Public Debt owned by American households in seven years.

 

http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Economy/Gross-domestic-savings/Current-US%24-per-capita

 

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.ADJ.ICTR.GN.ZS?cid=GPD_31?cid=GPD_31

 

Google Public Data

 

OECD Calculation of Personal Saving 

 

Gross Savings from Nationmaster

 

Net National Saving as Percent of GNI 

 

 

 

 

 

Net National Saving

 

 

National Saving Percent GNI

 

 

 

Savings as Percent of GDP

 

 

 

Gross Capital Formation

 

 

 

GNI Per Capita PPP

 

 

 

 

 

GNI per Capita Atlas Method

 

 

Norway vs. US

 

 

Definition of Personal Saving Rate

 

Total Gross Saving is defined as Net Private Saving, plus Net Government Saving, plus Consumption of Fixed Capital.

Net Private Saving is defined as Personal Saving, plus Undistributed Corporate Profits, plus Wage Accruals Less Disbursements.

Net Government Saving is defined as Federal Saving, plus State and Local Saving.

Consumption of Fixed Capital is defined as Private Consumption of Fixed Capital, plus Government Consumption of Fixed Capital.

So Personal Saving is a subset of Gross Saving which has ranged from 28.2% of Total Gross Saving in 1964 to 34.7% as late as 2009.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/erp2013/ERP2013_Appendix_B.pdf

What's even worse than a NEGATIVE Personal Savings rate (and we are the only industrialized nation with that problem) is to finally achieve a positive (but VERY small) Personal Savings Rate, only to have obamanation wipe it out completely, PLUS SOME.


In 2007, before obamanation, OUR $2,048 billion gross savings was made up of net savings of $280 billion and $1,768 billion of Consumption of Fixed Capital. Our $289 billion in Net Saving consisted of private saving of $513 billion plus a NEGATIVE $233 billion in government "saving". Net private saving consisted of $248.7 billion of Private Saving, $270.7 billion of undistributed corporate profits, and -$6.3 billion of wage accruals less disbursements.

So even though we did have $489.4 billion in Personal Savings in 2011, that, plus $750.7 billion in undistributed corporate profits, left us with a NEGATIVE Net Saving of -$99.3 BILLION.

Complicated enough of course.

But also BAD ENOUGH.

IMMEDIATELY in 2008, our NEGATIVE $233 billion in federal government "savings" almost TRIPLED, TO $613.5 billion, and then DOUBLED AGAIN to $1,299 billion in 2009, then to $1,308 billion in 2010, to $1,237 billion in 2011, to $1,239 billion in 2012--WITH ALL FIGURES SINCE THEN STILL A MYSTERY.

 

Or download here

 

2012 Statistical Abstract

 

personalsavings.gif (27889 bytes)

 

 

 

 

How Can a USC and Cal Berkley Alumnus not Know what a "Personal Saving Rate" Is? 

 

jetmagnet > IntelligenceisAVirtue •
It's called a recovery. Do you think you can have a recovery without spending? Try it.
Don Wadd > jetmagnet
Were you born stupid or learn as you went along?


jetmagnet > Don Wadd •
No, i have a degree in economics from Cal Berkley and a masters in Business form USC.
What's your education.

Chr1st1an > jetmagnet
Tell us, jetmagnet, how does Personal Savings fit into your bs degree?
Remember that we have a NEGATIVE RATE while Japan's is a PLUS 36% and China's is a PLUS 51%


jetmagnet > Chr1st1an
Personal savings for what? Your future retirement?
How many billionaires does japan have compared to the untied states? What's Japan's GDP compared to the United states? What's the average income per capita verses the United States?
What is the Yen worth vs the Dollar? Do you trade Forex?
Trade deficits with Japan and china has nothing to do with anything, overall. We have many trading partners.

Chr1st1an > jetmagnet
None of which answer the question.

jetmagnet > Chr1st1an
And what is the answer, sir????????????

jetmagnet > Chr1st1an
Yes, and this means what sir? Are you speaking of tax Havens?

Chr1st1an > jetmagnet

Permit me to restate the question:

"In the pursuit of your bs degrees, what were you taught about the importance of Personal Savings, how we became the only industrialized nation with a negative one, and what is our long term prognosis when our eternal enemy now has a population almost five times ours, ALL of whom have been forced by the nasty Chinese Communist government to suffer with a 52% Personal Savings Rate."


First of all country is spelled "country". Personal savings?
My money is in my corporate assets and liquidity.
Are you a moron? as you tslk in riddles. Who has a negative rate sir? You? Who the Fuck is "WE" sir? And what is your solution to this problem? LMAO
Ps here's a suggestion to you. My guess is your living off SS and maybe a retirement package. Move to Panama or Costa rica, where the tax rate is lower, Everything is lower, and learn to speak spanish.

Congratulations--that entire post was 100% fact free.

To set the record straight, we have property in Panama where my wife grew up, so I don't need to learn Spanish. We don't live there because the taxes are lower or it's a tax haven, it's because it's relatively liberal-free. If the amount of money that I and my employers put into "social security" had instead been put into our Japanese Postal Savings Account it would now be worth $1.5 million--but now the vast majority goes to illegal alien criminals who never worked and aren't retired.

Who is "we"?

The following might do, but if you'd prefer the historical record of our negative savings rate from the BEA, let me know.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/sa...

"Adults under age 35—the so-called millennial generation—currently have a savings rate of negative 2%, meaning they are burning through their assets or going into debt, according to Moody’s Analytics. That compares with a positive savings rate of about 3% for those age 35 to 44, 6% for those 45 to 54, and 13% for those 55 and older.

The turnabout in savings tendencies shows how the personal finances of millennials have become increasingly precarious despite five years of economic growth and sustained job creation. A lack of savings increases the vulnerability of young workers in the postrecession economy, leaving many without a financial cushion for unexpected expenses, raising the difficulty of job transitions and leaving them further away from goals like eventual homeownership—let alone retirement."

You are the grandest prevaricator on the planet.

Twelve divergent replies now, and not a single answer to the question?

How can it be explained!

 

HOW CAN IT BE POSSIBLE THAT YOU NEVER LEARNED FROM CAL BERKELY NOR USC WHAT PERSONAL SAVING IS?

 

You need to get your money back. They taught you NOTHING.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See here:

 

 

 

Table No. 646 of the 2002 US Statistical Abstract (USSA) reported that Personal Savings in 2000 was a negative $8.5 billion, or -0.1% of GDP, and Table No. 711 reported that the Statistical Discrepancy was $83.7 billion http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/01statab/income.pdf .  The Bureau of Econonic Analysis reported that our Personal Savings rate in 1999 was a negative 1.5%.

personalsaving.gif (46140 bytes)

But Table No. 640 of the 2002 USSA reported that we had a positive Personal Savings of $160.9 billion in 1999 and $67.7 billion in 2000 , while the Statistical Discrepancy in 2000 suddenly increased by 56% or $46.7 billion to $130.4 billion.  Where did this additional $76.2 billion in Personal Savings in 2000 (a figure which represents 58% of the Statistical Discrepancy) suddenly appear from?

 

 

personalsavings2001.gif (35256 bytes)

 

 

If it all came from the Statistical Discrepancy, then adjusting for it would adjust 1999 Personal Savings downward by $72.7 billion to only $88.2 billion, and 2000 Personal Savings downward by $130.4 billion to a negative $62.7 billion, or -1% of GDP.

Since this Statistical Discrepancy was only $1.1 billion in 1989, a 118 fold increase in only 11 years is indicative of a serious problem.  This is nothing less than a creative accounting method for concealing our record low, and negative, Personal Savings rate--unless government become so incompetent that it's error rate increased 118 fold.

In addition, Table No. 1143 of the 2002 USSA reports that Total Financial Assets of American households decreased between 1999 and 2001 by almost $3 trillion, from $35 trillion to $32 trillion.  Since that time, the DJIA plunged 50% and the Nasdaq plunged 76%, wiping out another $7.2 trillion, reducing Total Financial Assets to $24.9 trillion, a $10.1 trillion or 29% loss in less than four years.

During this same time, assets in Japanese households, which own as much as 90% of our $7 trillion public debt, increased by that much.  Where American households held only $998 billion or 19% of the $5.2 trillion public debt in 1996, by 2001 they owned only $539 billion or 9% of the $5,807 billion public debt, a 50% decrease in ownership of American assets by US citizens.  If this trend contined to this day, something that seems very likely, they now own only $355 billion or 5% of our $7 trillion public debt.

Are all of our Personal Savings represented by our "investments" in real estate?  Nope.  "The housing bubble, represented by $12.04 trillion in homeowner home real estate valuation, and $10.757 trillion in original home mortgage and secondary housing market paper, is the biggest such bubble in history. It has more than doubled its size since 1995."   But that's only a small part of the picture.  According to the latest Census Bureau reports, the median net worth of the 65 million home owners in 2000 was $55,000, which should be $3.6 trillion, whereas this report puts homeowner equity at only $1.3 trillion.  This suggests that a mere 11% decrease in real estate values would completely and instantly eliminate the entire homeowner equty of all American homeowners, or even put them in debt that they could never repay at current income levels.

personalsaving2.gif (45876 bytes)

mortgagedebt.gif (36957 bytes)

 

US Personal Savings Rate in 1999 is a negative 1-2%.
http://www.bea.doc.gov/bea/dn/pitbl.htm 
Table 2.--Disposition of Personal Income
[Billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Seasonally adjusted at annual rates
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------
                                              1997      1998     Mar. 99  Apr. 99r   May 99r  June 99r  July 99r  Aug. 99p
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Personal income.......................     6,784.0   7,126.1     7,374.9   7,406.6   7,430.3   7,486.0   7,502.8   7,541.9
Less:  Personal tax and nontax
   payments...........................       989.0   1,098.3     1,146.1   1,152.5   1,162.9   1,171.9   1,180.2   1,173.1
Equals:  Disposable personal income...     5,795.1   6,027.9     6,228.7   6,254.1   6,267.5   6,314.1   6,322.6   6,368.8
Less:  Personal outlays...............     5,674.1   6,000.2     6,289.5   6,331.1   6,362.5   6,382.3   6,405.7   6,461.8
  Personal consumption expenditures...     5,493.7   5,807.9     6,090.1   6,129.3   6,159.2   6,176.6   6,198.6   6,253.0
  Interest paid by persons............       161.5     172.4       179.2     180.4     182.0     184.4     185.8     187.5
  Personal transfer payments to the
    rest of the world (net)...........        18.9      19.9        20.2      21.3      21.3      21.3      21.3      21.3
Equals:  Personal saving..............       121.0      27.7       -60.7     -77.0     -95.0     -68.2     -83.1     -93.0
Addenda:
Disposable personal income:
  Chained (1992) dollars 1/...........     5,183.1   5,348.5     5,487.3   5,476.8   5,493.2   5,539.3   5,532.9   5,560.3
  Per capita:
    Current dollars...................      21,633    22,304      22,881    22,956    22,987    23,138    23,148    23,295
    Chained (1992) dollars............      19,349    19,790      20,158    20,103    20,147    20,299    20,257    20,337
  Population (thousands)..............     267,880   270,257     272,219   272,434   272,654   272,892   273,142   273,401
Personal saving as a percentage of
  disposable personal income .........         2.1       0.5        -1.0      -1.2      -1.5      -1.1      -1.3      -1.5

Detailed analysis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bureau of Economic Analysis

Personal Saving Rate

horizontal rule

Monthly and annual personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income

===============================================================================================
       JAN    FEB    MAR     APR    MAY    JUN    JUL    AUG    SEP    OCT    NOV    DEC   ANN.
1959:  8.3    7.7    7.5     8.4    7.9    7.9    7.9    6.8    5.9    6.6    7.3    8.3   7.6
1960:  8.3    7.8    6.6     5.5    7.5    7.6    7.4    7.4    7.1    7.0    6.9    7.5   7.2
1961:  8.1    8.2    7.4     7.5    7.7    8.5    9.1    8.8    8.4    8.8    8.8    8.7   8.3
1962:  8.2    8.7    8.6     8.7    8.1    8.7    8.8    8.6    7.6    8.3    7.5    7.3   8.3
1963:  7.9    7.7    7.6     7.6    7.9    7.6    7.2    7.2    8.1    8.7    8.2    7.8   7.8
1964:  7.9    7.5    9.3     9.5    8.7    8.6    8.3    8.3    9.0    8.5    9.8    9.7   8.8
1965:  9.2    7.7    7.7     7.2    8.3    9.1    9.0    8.8    9.8    8.1    8.8    8.9   8.6
1966:  8.4    8.1    7.6     7.3    8.2    8.4    8.0    8.4    8.1    8.8    9.0    8.7   8.3
1967:  9.2    9.6    9.9     8.9    9.1    8.9    9.7    9.7    8.9    9.7    9.6    9.3   9.4
1968:  8.9    9.4    8.8     9.5    9.2    8.8    7.8    7.6    7.6    7.8    7.6    8.1   8.4
1969:  7.2    6.5    7.1     6.6    7.0    7.9    8.7    8.4    8.5    8.3    8.5    8.6   7.8
1970:  8.3    8.1    8.8    10.4    9.3    8.7   10.0   10.0    9.7    9.8   10.2    9.7   9.4
1971: 10.0    9.8   10.1     9.8   10.2   11.3   10.3   10.3    9.6    9.6    9.4    9.5  10.0
1972:  9.1    9.4    8.2     8.2    8.5    7.3    8.3    8.7    8.8    9.4   10.0   10.2   8.9
1973:  9.1    9.4    9.7    10.0   10.2   10.6   10.2   11.0   10.2   11.5   11.5   12.0  10.5
1974: 11.6   11.4   10.7    10.2   10.1   10.3   10.6    9.5   10.3   10.8   11.2   11.3  10.7
1975: 10.4    9.5    9.7    11.3   14.6   11.4    9.7   10.1   10.2   10.7   10.0    9.3  10.6
1976:  9.2    9.9    9.8     9.4   10.1    9.2    9.6    9.6    9.3    8.9    9.3    8.5   9.4
1977:  8.9    7.6    8.8     8.5    8.3    8.7    8.6    9.0    9.2    8.9    9.1    9.2   8.7
1978:  9.9    9.1    9.1     9.0    8.6    8.2    9.2    8.7    9.0    9.2    9.1    9.0   9.0
1979:  9.5    9.3    9.5     9.4    9.2    8.9    9.6    8.7    8.3    9.0    9.1    9.5   9.2
1980:  9.6    9.9   10.0    10.4   10.3   10.0   10.0    9.9   10.3   10.2   10.8   10.8  10.2
1981: 10.5   10.3   10.1     9.8    9.9    9.7   11.3   11.1   11.4   12.1   12.2   11.4  10.8
1982: 11.5   11.0   11.2    11.9   11.4   11.2   11.5   11.4   10.5   10.1    9.7    9.5  10.9
1983:  9.7    9.8    9.2     8.7    8.5    7.8    8.6    8.2    8.8    8.7    9.1    8.8   8.8
1984:  8.7   10.6   10.5    10.6   10.3   10.3   11.1   11.5   11.5   11.0   10.3   10.9  10.6
1985: 10.4    9.2    8.8    10.1   11.1    9.6    9.1    8.3    7.1    9.1    8.7    8.4   9.2
1986:  8.4    9.1    9.7     9.2    8.8    8.9    8.6    8.3    6.4    7.5    7.7    6.0   8.2
1987:  8.8    7.8    7.9     3.7    7.5    7.1    7.0    6.7    7.2    7.8    8.0    8.1   7.3
1988:  7.5    8.0    7.6     8.0    7.6    7.7    7.9    7.7    8.1    7.7    7.7    7.9   7.8
1989:  8.0    8.3    8.7     7.8    7.5    7.7    7.5    6.7    6.8    6.9    7.5    6.9   7.5
1990:  7.3    8.1    7.8     8.1    7.9    7.8    8.0    7.5    7.6    7.5    7.6    8.2   7.8
1991:  8.7    8.4    7.7     8.2    8.0    8.5    8.0    8.2    8.4    8.5    8.2    8.9   8.3
1992:  8.5    8.9    8.8     9.0    8.9    8.8    8.5    8.7    7.9    8.1    8.0   10.2   8.7
1993:  7.1    6.9    7.2     7.7    7.8    7.2    6.7    6.9    6.5    6.3    6.3    8.7   7.1
1994:  5.5    5.3    5.6     5.5    6.8    6.3    6.4    6.0    6.3    6.6    6.3    6.6   6.1
1995:  6.4    6.7    6.3     5.5    5.6    5.1    5.6    4.8    5.3    5.6    5.2    4.8   5.6
1996:  5.1    5.0    5.1     3.7    4.6    5.2    5.0    4.9    5.1    4.6    4.7    4.6   4.8
1997:  4.3    4.5    4.7     5.0    5.1    4.8    4.1    4.3    4.4    4.4    4.4    4.4   4.5
1998:  4.2    4.0    4.0     3.9    3.3    3.3    3.6    3.5    3.5    3.4    4.1    3.2   3.7
1999:  3.4    3.1    2.6     2.6    2.4    2.6    2.4    2.3    1.6    2.4    1.9    1.0   2.3
2000:  1.4

 

 

BEA spreadsheets

personalsavings.gif (27889 bytes)

http://web.archive.org/web/20010606123004/http://www.asiaweek.com/asiaweek/magazine/2000/1020/bottomline.html

 

The following is from Asia Week: http://www.cnn.com/ASIANOW/asiaweek/magazine/2000/1020/bottomline.html

Country
Exports
12 months

GDP
Growth

Per-cap.
GDP
(PPP)

Per-cap. GNP
(nominal)

Pop
(m)

Pop
Growth

Inflation
(CPI)

Curr. A/C
Balance

Reserves
excl. gold

Savings
% of GDP

People
per tel

Life
Expectancy

People
per Dr

Infant
Mortality
Taiwan -0.3% 6.3% $15,370 $13,130 21.8 1.0% $122b. $9.9b. $87.8b. 25% 2.1 75 903 4
Saudi Arabia 0.3% 2.4% $12,265 $7,150 19.6 4.3% $56.7b. $0.2b. $7.0b. 30% 8.5 70 698 29
Switzerland 0.4% 0.2% $26,315 $37,050 7.1 0.6% $97.1b. $19.8b. $34.2b. 27% 1.1 78 585 6
France 1.0% 2.3% $21,860 $24,040 58.7 0.6% $274b. $32.0b. $28.9b. 21% 1.5 77 320 6
New Zealand 1.1% 2.4% $18,250 $17,010 3.7 1.0% $14.2b. -$4.2b. $4.1b. 26% 1.4 77 321 7
Italy 1.4% 1.9% $20,545 $19,480 57.5 0.2% $251b. $40.1b. $51.1b. 22% 1.9 78 195 7
Canada 1.6% 3.7% $21,800 $18,900 30.3 1.3% $210b. -$2.2b. $22.3b. 21% 1.3 78 446 6
China 1.8% 8.0% $3,240 $655 1,232.1 1.2% $151b. $7.2b. $134.0b. 40% 22.4 71 1,034 31
Germany 1.9% 2.9% $20,864 $25,860 82.6 0.7% $521b. -$9.8b. $77.3b. 23% 1.8 76 333 6
U.S. 2.2% 3.5% $28,515 $28,480 269.2 1.0% $639b. -$158.7b. $55.6b. 15% 1.3 77 387 8
Malaysia 2.3% 8.4% $9,835 $4,466 21.7 2.4% $78.2b. -$5.2b. $21.1b. 41% 5.5 72 2,063 11
Singapore 2.3% 7.8% $24,610 $30,500 3.1 2.0% $125b. $14.2b. $80.4b. 51% 2.0 77 667 4
Japan 2.4% -0.3% $23,440 $33,090 126.1 0.3% $411b. $78.8b. $224.4b. 31% 1.5 80 545 4
Fiji 2.8% 4.4% $5,590 $2,535 0.8 1.5% $0.7b. $0.01b. $0.4b. 13% 8.9 72 2,080 20
Brunei 3.2% 3.0% $18,900 $20,400 0.3 3.2% $2.3b. $0.8b. $30.0b. 35% 3.8 75 1,133 8

Country

Exports
12 months

GDP
Growth

Per-cap.
GDP
(PPP)

Per-cap. GNP
(nominal)

Pop
(m)

Pop
Growth

Inflation
(CPI)

Curr. A/C
Balance

Reserves
excl. gold

Savings
% of GDP

People
per tel

Life
Expectancy

People
per Dr

Infant
Mortality
Maldives 3.5% 6.5% $2,485 $900 0.3 3.0% $0.1b. $0.01b. $0.1b. 11% 15.5 64 5,330 55
Vietnam 3.6% 9.5% $1,310 $270 76.9 2.3% $8.0b. -$2.9b. $0.6b. 16% 63.4 67 2,298 34
Britain 3.7% 3.5% $20,170 $20,860 58.6 0.3% $260b. $3.6b. $35.2b. 15% 1.9 76 581 6
Egypt 4.0% 5.1% $3,965 $1,140 61.1 2.2% $4.7b. -$0.2b. $18.4b. 7% 20.8 64 1,316 40
Macau 4.2% 3.9% $16,840 $17,475 0.5 3.8% $2.0b. $1.9b. $2.0b. 28% 2.5 73 758 6
South Korea 4.2% 6.3% $12,390 $10,730 45.9 0.9% $135b. -$18.6b. $30.4b. 37% 2.1 72 855 8
Brazil 4.3% 5.0% $5,675 $4,755 162.8 1.9% $51.1b. -$33.5b. $62.3b. 21% 10.0 67 847 50
Hong Kong 5.3% 6.4% $24,085 $24,455 6.5 2.1% $182b. $2.1b. $88.1b. 35% 1.5 79 772 4
P. N. Guinea 5.3% 2.3% $2,470 $1,249 4.3 2.3% $2.4b. $0.2b. $0.6b. 28% 49.0 57 12,500 53
Philippines 5.7% 5.7% $3,020 $1,265 71.8 2.3% $23.5b. -$3.5b. $10.3b. 16% 38.6 67 1,016 40
Bangladesh 6.1% 4.7% $1,450 $283 125.8 2.2% $3.8b. -$1.0b. $1.6b. 8% 380.0 57 12,500 85
Laos 6.2% 6.9% $1,670 $370 5.0 2.9% $0.3b. -$0.3b. $0.2b. 4% 181.5 52 4,381 91
India 6.6% 6.8% $1,500 $360 953.7 2.1% $35.9b. -$5.1b. $26.8b. 28% 77.6 61 2,165 75
Indonesia 7.0% 7.8% $4,140 $1,086 200.0 1.6% $52.8b. -$8.9b. $19.3b. 37% 47.7 63 6,786 50
Sri Lanka 7.2% 3.8% $3,415 $760 18.5 1.2% $4.3b. -$0.7b. $2.1b. 16% 72.9 72 5,888 14

Country

Exports
12 months

GDP
Growth

Per-cap.
GDP
(PPP)

Per-cap. GNP
(nominal)

Pop
(m)

Pop
Growth

Inflation
(CPI)

Curr. A/C
Balance

Reserves
excl. gold

Savings
% of GDP

People
per tel

Life
Expectancy

People
per Dr

Infant
Mortality
Thailand 7.2% 6.4% $8,165 $2,970 61.4 1.5% $56.9b. -$11.5b. $28.4b. 36% 13.5 69 4,361 26
South Africa 8.7% 2.3% $4,065 $2,928 43.1 2.2% $30.8b. -$1.2b. $4.8b. 19% 6.9 64 1,750 51
Bhutan 9.0% 6.4% $1,475 $420 0.7 2.3% $0.1b. -$0.05b. $0.2b. 36% 115.2 52 4,255 122
Nepal 9.1% 6.1% $1,165 $210 22.1 2.3% $0.4b. -$0.3b. $0.6b. 11% 174.0 55 12,612 81
Pakistan 12.5% 3.1% $2,340 $465 137.4 2.9% $8.6b. -$4.2b. $1.2b. 12% 56.1 62 2,000 88
Russia 12.9% 0.2% $4,355 $2,965 149.8 0.4% $88.7b. $11.1b. $20.4b. 32% 5.9 68 220 20
Afghanistan 14.0% 6.0% $720 $150 21.2 1.9% $0.2b. -$0.1b. $0.2b. 10% 390.0 45 7,358 164
Cambodia 14.9% 6.0% $1,266 $270 10.3 2.5% $0.6b. -$0.3b. $0.3b. 6% 1,212.0 53 9,523 110
Kenya 18.0% 4.6% $1,377 $293 30.3 3.4% $1.9b. -$0.4b. $0.7b. 21% 62.7 59 9,851 50
Iran 18.1% 4.2% $5,570 $2,320 62.9 3.4% $18.3b. $3.2b. $5.0b. 30% 13.2 68 3,140 35
Mexico 18.9% 8.8% $6,780 $3,600 93.9 1.9% $104b. -$4.0b. $25.8b. 19% 7.6 71 578 26
Nigeria 22.2% 2.1% $1,480 $340 104.4 2.9% $13.5b. -$1.9b. $4.1b. 20% 260.5 53 5,882 84
Myanmar 25.7% 6.0% $753 $765 48.3 2.1% $1.0b. -$0.3b. $0.2b. 11% 265.5 59 12,500 79
Mongolia 57.5% 2.6% $2,185 $335 2.5 2.7% $0.4b. -$0.06b. $0.1b. 14% 26.7 64 364 57
Turkey 89.9% 6.7% $6,020 $2,800 64.0 2.1% $32.3b. -$5.0b. $17.8b. 20% 4.6 67 955 62

These figures are the latest available from national and multilateral sources (telephone data from Int. Telecom. Union). Population growth is the percentage increase in one year and includes births, deaths, emigration and immigration. Though standards may differ, literacy generally means the ability to read and write a short, simple statement about everyday life. Literacy rates refer to the population over fifteen years of age (ten for Singapore). Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the value of all goods and services produced in one year. Purchasing-Power Parity (PPP) takes into account price differences between countries to provide a more accurate picture of national wealth. GDP growth is adjusted for inflation. Gross National Product (GNP) is GDP plus payments from abroad from investments, labor and minus similar payments to foreigners. Per-capita GNP is converted to U.S. dollars using average exchange rates. Net creditor.

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The following page was removed from the Bureau of Economic Analysis web site on June 4, 2001 and does not appear anywhere else on the public government web sites.

This copy was retrieved from http://web.archive.org/web/20010604202816/http://www.bea.doc.gov/bea/dn/saverate.htm on October 13, 2002

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Bureau of Economic Analysis

Personal Saving Rate

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Annual personal saving as percentage of disposable personal income

===============================================================================================

 1929-33  :       4.7        4.3        4.0       -0.8       -1.5
 1934-38  :       1.2        4.4        6.4        6.2        2.2
 1939-43  :       4.7        5.9       12.4       24.4       25.8
 1944-48  :      26.3       20.6       10.1        4.7        7.3
 1949-53  :       5.2        7.2        8.5        8.5        8.2
 1954-58  :       7.5        6.9        8.4        8.4        8.5
 1959-63  :       7.6        7.2        8.3        8.3        7.8
 1964-68  :       8.8        8.6        8.3        9.4        8.4
 1969-73  :       7.8        9.4       10.0        8.9       10.5
 1974-78  :      10.7       10.6        9.4        8.7        9.0
 1979-83  :       9.2       10.2       10.8       10.9        8.8
 1984-88  :      10.6        9.2        8.2        7.3        7.8
 1989-93  :       7.5        7.8        8.3        8.7        7.1
 1994-98  :       6.1        5.6        4.8        4.2        4.2
 1999-00  :       2.2       -0.1


    

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Monthly and annual personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income

===============================================================================================
       JAN    FEB    MAR     APR    MAY    JUN    JUL    AUG    SEP    OCT    NOV    DEC   ANN.
1959:  8.3    7.7    7.5     8.4    7.9    7.9    7.9    6.8    5.9    6.6    7.3    8.3   7.6
1960:  8.3    7.8    6.6     5.5    7.5    7.6    7.4    7.4    7.1    7.0    6.9    7.5   7.2
1961:  8.1    8.2    7.4     7.5    7.7    8.5    9.1    8.8    8.4    8.8    8.8    8.7   8.3
1962:  8.2    8.7    8.6     8.7    8.1    8.7    8.8    8.6    7.6    8.3    7.5    7.3   8.3
1963:  7.9    7.7    7.6     7.6    7.9    7.6    7.2    7.2    8.1    8.7    8.2    7.8   7.8
1964:  7.9    7.5    9.3     9.5    8.7    8.6    8.3    8.3    9.0    8.5    9.8    9.7   8.8
1965:  9.2    7.7    7.7     7.2    8.3    9.1    9.0    8.8    9.8    8.1    8.8    8.9   8.6
1966:  8.4    8.1    7.6     7.3    8.2    8.4    8.0    8.4    8.1    8.8    9.0    8.7   8.3
1967:  9.2    9.6    9.9     8.9    9.1    8.9    9.7    9.7    8.9    9.7    9.6    9.3   9.4
1968:  8.9    9.4    8.8     9.5    9.2    8.8    7.8    7.6    7.6    7.8    7.6    8.1   8.4
1969:  7.2    6.5    7.1     6.6    7.0    7.9    8.7    8.4    8.5    8.3    8.5    8.6   7.8
1970:  8.3    8.1    8.8    10.4    9.3    8.7   10.0   10.0    9.7    9.8   10.2    9.7   9.4
1971: 10.0    9.8   10.1     9.8   10.2   11.3   10.3   10.3    9.6    9.6    9.4    9.5  10.0
1972:  9.1    9.4    8.2     8.2    8.5    7.3    8.3    8.7    8.8    9.4   10.0   10.2   8.9
1973:  9.1    9.4    9.7    10.0   10.2   10.6   10.2   11.0   10.2   11.5   11.5   12.0  10.5
1974: 11.6   11.4   10.7    10.2   10.1   10.3   10.6    9.5   10.3   10.8   11.2   11.3  10.7
1975: 10.4    9.5    9.7    11.3   14.6   11.4    9.7   10.1   10.2   10.7   10.0    9.3  10.6
1976:  9.2    9.9    9.8     9.4   10.1    9.2    9.6    9.6    9.3    8.9    9.3    8.5   9.4
1977:  8.9    7.6    8.8     8.5    8.3    8.7    8.6    9.0    9.2    8.9    9.1    9.2   8.7
1978:  9.9    9.1    9.1     9.0    8.6    8.2    9.2    8.7    9.0    9.2    9.1    9.0   9.0
1979:  9.5    9.3    9.5     9.4    9.2    8.9    9.6    8.7    8.3    9.0    9.1    9.5   9.2
1980:  9.6    9.9   10.0    10.4   10.3   10.0   10.0    9.9   10.3   10.2   10.8   10.8  10.2
1981: 10.5   10.3   10.1     9.8    9.9    9.7   11.3   11.1   11.4   12.1   12.2   11.4  10.8
1982: 11.5   11.0   11.2    11.9   11.4   11.2   11.5   11.4   10.5   10.1    9.7    9.5  10.9
1983:  9.7    9.8    9.2     8.7    8.5    7.8    8.6    8.2    8.8    8.7    9.1    8.8   8.8
1984:  8.7   10.6   10.5    10.6   10.3   10.3   11.1   11.5   11.5   11.0   10.3   10.9  10.6
1985: 10.4    9.2    8.8    10.1   11.1    9.6    9.1    8.3    7.1    9.1    8.7    8.4   9.2
1986:  8.4    9.1    9.7     9.2    8.8    8.9    8.6    8.3    6.4    7.5    7.7    6.0   8.2
1987:  8.8    7.8    7.9     3.7    7.5    7.1    7.0    6.7    7.2    7.8    8.0    8.1   7.3
1988:  7.5    8.0    7.6     8.0    7.6    7.7    7.9    7.7    8.1    7.7    7.7    7.9   7.8
1989:  8.0    8.3    8.7     7.8    7.5    7.7    7.5    6.7    6.8    6.9    7.5    6.9   7.5
1990:  7.3    8.1    7.8     8.1    7.9    7.8    8.0    7.5    7.6    7.5    7.6    8.2   7.8
1991:  8.7    8.4    7.7     8.2    8.0    8.5    8.0    8.2    8.4    8.5    8.2    8.9   8.3
1992:  8.5    8.9    8.8     9.0    8.9    8.8    8.5    8.7    7.9    8.1    8.0   10.2   8.7
1993:  7.1    6.9    7.2     7.7    7.8    7.2    6.7    6.9    6.5    6.3    6.3    8.7   7.1
1994:  5.5    5.3    5.6     5.5    6.8    6.3    6.4    6.0    6.3    6.6    6.3    6.6   6.1
1995:  6.4    6.7    6.3     5.5    5.6    5.1    5.6    4.8    5.3    5.6    5.2    4.8   5.6
1996:  5.1    5.0    5.1     3.7    4.6    5.2    5.0    4.9    5.1    4.6    4.7    4.6   4.8
1997:  4.1    4.2    4.4     4.4    4.8    4.5    3.7    4.0    4.1    4.2    4.3    4.2   4.2
1998:  4.6    4.6    4.6     4.7    4.2    4.0    4.3    4.2    3.9    3.8    4.3    3.3   4.2
1999:  3.5    3.2    2.7     2.5    2.5    2.5    2.1    2.1    1.3    2.0    1.8    0.7   2.2
2000:  0.6   -0.1    0.1     0.3    0.3    0.3   -0.2   -0.4    0.0   -0.6   -0.8   -0.7  -0.1
2001: -1.3   -0.8   -0.6    -0.7

 
note: monthly personal saving as percentage of disposable personal income is
 available beginning with 1959