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Plagiarism by jews

If you copy somebody else's protected work, you could get sued and have to pay the owner the amount he or she actually lost because of the infringement, or $10,000 for each time you violated the owner's rights, and pay his or her attorney's fees.

 

bulletChief plagiarist Martin Luther King.
bulletChief scientific plagiarist Albert Einstein.
bulletSuccessful plagiarist Gloria Wrenn.

 

http://www.zoology.ubc.ca/bpg/plagiarism.htm#Top

PLAGIARISM

What it is, and How to Avoid It

Prepared by:

Dr. Colin H. Gordon
(Department of History, UBC)

Professor Peter Simmons
(President’s Advisory Committee on Student Discipline, UBC)

Dr. Graeme Wynn
(Associate Dean of Arts, UBC)

The Faculty of Arts
The University of British Columbia

 

1. INTRODUCTION

 2. WHAT IS PLAGIARISM?

 3. AVOIDING PLAGIARISM

EXAMPLES

1. INTRODUCTION

Plagiarism is a serious academic offence. Each year a number of cases of plagiarism are brought to the attention of the Dean of Arts and the President’s Office. Depending on the severity of the offence, students found guilty of plagiarism may lose credit for the assignment in question, be awarded a mark of zero in the course, or face suspension from the University. Most cases which pass through the Dean’s office result in at least a temporary suspension from the University (permanently noted on the student’s transcript) and a mark of zero.

 

2. WHAT IS PLAGIARISM?

 

Complete plagiarism
Near-Complete plagiarism
Patchwork plagiarism
Lazy plagiarism
Self plagiarism

 

Most simply, plagiarism is intellectual theft. Any use of another author’s research, ideas, or language without proper attribution may be considered plagiarism. Because such definitions include many shades of accidental or intentional plagiarism, these need to be described more fully.

Complete Plagiarism

 

bulletThis is the most obvious case: a student submits, as his or her own work, an essay that has been written by someone else. Usually the original source is a published journal article or book chapter. The use of unpublished work, including the work of another student, is just as serious.
bulletIn such cases, plagiarism cannot be "avoided" by paraphrasing the original or acknowledging its use in footnotes. The work is the property of another author and should not be used. See Example #1

Near-complete Plagiarism

 

bulletA student may also lift portions of another text and use them in his or her own work. For example, a student might add her or his own conclusions or introduction to an essay. Or a student might scatter his or her own comments through a text taken substantially from another source.
bulletThese practices are unacceptable. Even with some attribution, the bulk of the work has been done by another. See Example #1

Patchwork Plagiarism

In many cases, a student will lift ideas, phrases, sentences, and paragraphs from a variety of sources and "stitch" them together into an essay. These situations often seem difficult to assess. Most essays, after all, are attempts to bring together a range of sources and arguments. But the line between plagiarism and original work is not difficult to draw. See Example #2

Lazy Plagiarism

Lazy plagiarism crops up in many student essays, and is usually the result of sloppy note-taking or research shortcuts. Examples include:

 

bulletinadvertent use of another’s language, usually when the student fails to distinguish between direct quotes and general observations when taking notes. In such cases, the presence of a footnote does not excuse the use of another’s language without quotation marks.
bulletuse of footnotes or material quoted in other sources as if they were the results of your research.
bulletsloppy or inadequate footnoting which leaves out sources or page references.

Although it may not be the student’s intention to deceive, it is often difficult for instructors to distinguish between purposeful and accidental plagiarism. See Example #3

Self Plagiarism

 

bulletThe use of an essay written for one course to satisfy the requirements of another course is plagiarism. Students should not use, adapt, or update an essay written for another purpose.