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posterity

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Main Entry:

pos·ter·i·ty Listen to the pronunciation of posterity

Pronunciation:

\pä-'ster-?-te\

Function:

noun

Etymology:

Middle English posterite, from Anglo-French pusterité, from Latin posteritat-, posteritas, from posterus coming after

Date:

14th century

1 : the offspring of one progenitor to the furthest generation 2 : all future generations

 

 

 

Dor Means Race, not Generations

 

 

Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If any man of you or of your posterity shall be unclean by reason of a dead body, or be in a journey afar off, yet he shall keep the passover unto the LORD. Num 9:10

 

We see from the following that posterity is translated from the Hebrew word dor, which is also translated many times as generation or generations:

any man376, 376 of you or176 of your posterity1755

H1755

do^r do^r

dore, dore

From H1752; properly a revolution of time, that is, an age or generation; also a dwelling: - age, X evermore, generation, [n-]ever, posterity.

The everlasting covenant that God with Abraham through Jacob would have been far easier to comprehend had dor been translated as "their posterity" rather than "in their generations":

And I will establish my covenant between me and thee and thy seed after thee in their generations for an everlasting covenant, to be a God unto thee, and to thy seed after thee. Gen 17:7

thee in their generations1755

It's important to note also that seed means posterity:

H2233

zera?

zeh'-rah

From H2232; seed; figuratively fruit, plant, sowing time, posterity: - X carnally, child, fruitful, seed (-time), sowing-time.

So the way this everlasting covenant should have been worded in English is: 

And I will establish my covenant between me and thee and thy descendants after thee and their posterity for an everlasting covenant, to be a God unto thee, and to thy descendants after thee.