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Two Thirds of Americans Blame Israel for 9-11

"The poll showed 58 percent of Americans surveyed saw U.S.
ties to Israel and its policies toward the Palestinians as a
major motivation behind the attacks on New York and Washington.
That figure was down from 68 percent last month."

Consider the consequences of this incredible revelation, made less than one month after 911.

More than two thirds of Americans viewed "U.S. ties to Israel and its policies" as the CAUSE of 911, but in less than a month, it was down to 58%.

What could possibly have happened to change the opinions of so many Americans in *favor* of Israel?  Did 911 have that effect?   Is this one of the side benefits of Israel's bombing of the WTC?

In any event, the simple fact that two thirds of Americans view our involvement with jews in israel as the root cause of the problem begs the solution:  STOP.

Don't send another nickel to Israel.  Demand RIGHT NOW that Israel repay us for each nickel of the $130 billion they've robbed from our "foreign aid" fund so far.  Exile the jews to Madagascar.  Reclaim the Holy Land for the 2 billion Christians and 1.2 billion Muslims in the world who could enjoy it in peace. 

And most of all, quit permitting jews to distract our attention from the far more serious problems at home:

  1. Erosion of Constitutional rights.
  2. Breakdown of the Christian family.
  3. Miscegenation of Whites with muds.
  4. Decimation of the White Christian Israelite Race.
  5. Looting of our banks, savings and loans, retirement funds, social security funds, and insurance accounts.
  6. Affirmative action

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http://www.reuters.co.il/news2000/N2S6IO60.HTM
Americans split on changing Mideast policy  - poll
    NEW YORK, Oct 6 (Reuters) _ Americans are split on whether 
the United States should change its Middle East policies after 
the Sept. 11 attacks, with 63 percent saying reducing ties to 
Israel would not affect the scope of terrorism directed at 
America, a Newsweek poll showed on Saturday. 
    The poll showed 58 percent of Americans surveyed saw U.S. 
ties to Israel and its policies toward the Palestinians as a 
major motivation behind the attacks on New York and Washington. 
That figure was down from 68 percent last month. 
    Forty-six percent said the United States should consider 
changing its Middle East policies to reduce the violent 
backlash against it, while 43 percent said it should not. 
    The 1,002 respondents surveyed on Thursday and Friday also 
were divided on whether the United States should favor creating 
a Palestinian state at this time, with 39 percent saying no, 33 
percent saying yes and 28 percent saying they did not know. 
    Majorities said the United States gave too much aid to 
countries in the region last year: 52 percent said $2.8 billion 
to Israel was excessive, 55 percent had the same objection to 
the $2.2 billion given to Egypt and 56 percent to the $80 
million given to the Palestinian Authority. 
    President George W. Bush continued to get high marks for 
his handling of the crisis -- 88 percent -- but the public 
expressed more confidence in Secretary of State Colin Powell to 
deal with the situation (75 percent) than either Bush (65 
percent) or Vice President Dick Cheney (50 percent). 
    The poll, conducted by Princeton Survey Research 
Associates, had a margin of error of plus or minus three 
percentage points. 

06 OCT 2001 15:56:01
Americans split on changing Mideast policy -poll

 

 

NEW YORK, Oct 6 (Reuters) _ Americans are split on whether
the United States should change its Middle East policies after
the Sept. 11 attacks, with 63 percent saying reducing ties to
Israel would not affect the scope of terrorism directed at
America, a Newsweek poll showed on Saturday.
The poll showed 58 percent of Americans surveyed saw U.S.
ties to Israel and its policies toward the Palestinians as a
major motivation behind the attacks on New York and Washington.
That figure was down from 68 percent last month.
Forty-six percent said the United States should consider
changing its Middle East policies to reduce the violent
backlash against it, while 43 percent said it should not.
The 1,002 respondents surveyed on Thursday and Friday also
were divided on whether the United States should favor creating
a Palestinian state at this time, with 39 percent saying no, 33
percent saying yes and 28 percent saying they did not know.
Majorities said the United States gave too much aid to
countries in the region last year: 52 percent said $2.8 billion
to Israel was excessive, 55 percent had the same objection to
the $2.2 billion given to Egypt and 56 percent to the $80
million given to the Palestinian Authority.
President George W. Bush continued to get high marks for
his handling of the crisis -- 88 percent -- but the public
expressed more confidence in Secretary of State Colin Powell to
deal with the situation (75 percent) than either Bush (65
percent) or Vice President Dick Cheney (50 percent).
The poll, conducted by Princeton Survey Research
Associates, had a margin of error of plus or minus three
percentage points.

06 OCT 2001 15:56:01
Americans split on changing Mideast policy -poll

 

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http://www.reuters.co.il/news2000/N2SD43KM.HTM 
Poll sees Americans support cutting aid to Israel
    WASHINGTON, April 12 (Reuters) - Most Americans believe the 
United States should halt or reduce economic and military aid 
to Israel if Prime Minister Ariel Sharon does not immediately 
withdraw troops from Palestinian areas, according to a Time 
Magazine/CNN poll released on Friday. 
    The poll of 1,003 adults also found most Americans back 
Secretary of State Colin Powell's Mideast peace mission, 
although they expect few results and consider Palestinian 
leader Yasser Arafat a "terrorist" and an enemy of the U.S. 
    The public opinion sampling was conducted on Wednesday and 
Thursday, before Powell arrived in Israel on Friday, when a 
suicide bomber killed six people outside a Jerusalem market. 
    Sharon has rejected repeated direct calls by President 
George W. Bush to withdraw troops from Palestinian areas, 
prompting some critics to raise the possibility of sanctions. 
    But the administration has made clear it has no plans to 
threaten key ally Israel with a cut in its $3 billion in annual 
aid. Even if it did, a strongly pro-Israel U.S. Congress likely 
would oppose the move. 
    The Time/CNN poll found that 60 percent of Americans 
favored the aid cut off if an Israeli troop withdrawal does not 
take place immediately. 
    An even larger number -- 75 percent -- think Powell's 
Mideast trip is a good idea but only 21 percent of the 
respondents believe major progress toward peace will result. 
    As for Arafat, 59 percent of Americans consider him an 
enemy of the United States, 62 percent think he's a terrorist 
and 90 percent believe he cannot be trusted, according to the 
poll. 
    Sharon's standing is better. One quarter of the respondents 
consider him an enemy of the United States, 20 percent say he 
is a terrorist and 65 percent do not trust him. 
    The poll found that 65 percent of Americans think Bush is 
doing a good job handling foreign policy, a significant decline 
from the 80 percent favorable rating he had in December 2001, 
three months after the Sept. 11 attacks. 
    Fear of terrorism has declined. Last September, 45 percent 
of the poll respondents identified terrorism as the main 
problem facing the United States. That number declined to 25 
percent in December and 21 percent this week. 
    The poll was conducted by Harris Interactive and has a 
margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points. 
 ((Washington bureau, +1 202-898-8300, fax +1 202-898-8383, 
carol.giacomo@reuters.com)) 
   

13 APR 2002 01:38:14
Poll sees Americans support cutting aid to Israel