In 1957 the World Health Organization (WHO) decided Dr. Sabin's vaccine deserved world-wide testing. He was invited to administer the vaccine to large groups of children in parts of Russia, Holland, Mexico, Chile, Sweden, and Japan. But at home in the United States, he had a hard time convincing the Poliomyelitis Foundation and the U.S. Public Health Service his method was any better than Jonas Salk's "killed" vaccine method.

It is precisely these countries whom Dr. Sabin convinced to take his vaccine who since then have had the highest increase in their cancer rates in the world, bar none. Russia, with a cancer mortality rate of 230 per 100,000 population, loses 300,000 more citizens to cancer each year than if they had a cancer rate similar to countries like Sri Lanka who didn't take the Sabin vaccine!

 

 

 

http://www.chmcc.org/chrf/overview/history/polio.asp

 

 

 

History

Albert Sabin and the Oral Polio Vaccine

Albert B. Sabin, M.D.

Born in Poland in 1906, Albert Sabin, M.D., and his family left there in 1921 to escape anti-Semitism. He came to Children's Hospital of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1939. Dr. Sabin's research, documented in some 350 scientific papers, would include work on pneumonia, encephalitis, toxoplasmosis, viruses, sandfly fever, dengue and cancer. But his passion was poliomyelitis, and this was where he turned his attention after World War II.

Dr. Sabin first thought the polio virus gained entrance through the respiratory tract, then found evidence that entry was through the digestive system. His studies of incidence showed that, contrary to many diseases, acute polio was rare in urban populations with poor sanitation conditions (as existed in many parts of China).

Follow-up studies showed that children in such places had protective antibodies in their blood, though they exhibited no sign of ever having had polio. Albert B. Sabin, M.D.Dr. Sabin reasoned that such immune children had either contracted the viral infection as infants (when they had partial immunity transferred from their mothers) or been infected by an attenuated or weakened strain of the virus, which had produced immunity without acute symptoms.

Dr. Sabin then scoured the world looking for weak strains of polio virus, found three, and began to develop his oral, "live" vaccine, administered at first on a lump of sugar or in a teaspoonful of syrup.

In 1957 the World Health Organization (WHO) decided Dr. Sabin's vaccine deserved world-wide testing. He was invited to administer the vaccine to large groups of children in parts of Russia, Holland, Mexico, Chile, Sweden, and Japan. But at home in the United States, he had a hard time convincing the Poliomyelitis Foundation and the U.S. Public Health Service his method was any better than Jonas Salk's "killed" vaccine method.

An advantage of Dr. Sabin's oral vaccine, especially in less developed countries, is ease of administration: no shots. But two other pluses are even more important. First, the live vaccine gives both intestinal and bodily immunity; the killed vaccine gives only bodily immunity and allows the immune person to still serve as a carrier or transmitter. Second, the Sabin vaccine produces lifelong immunity without the need for a booster shot or vaccination. Sabin Day, April, 1960

By the time the U.S. Public Health Service gave approval for testing, some 80 million people outside the U.S. had taken the vaccine. The first U.S. test was held on "Sabin Sunday," April 24, 1960.

Polio is now virtually unknown in the U.S., rare in other parts of the world, and calculations show that, in hospital costs in the U.S. alone, enough money is saved each year to more than pay for all the research ever done on polio. Each year in the U.S. the effects of the Sabin vaccine keep about 25,000 people from getting polio; keep about 2,000 of them from dying, and about 2,500 from being completely disabled.

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