Security?

 

 

As a test of our "new and improved" federally sponsored airport security system where bomb sniffing dogs invade your grandmothers' underwear and muds posing as "civil servants" got to rough up the White congressmen they have always HATED so much, I put an ordinary pair of office scissors into my brief case to see just how far it would get me.  To my surprise, upon leaving the U.S., even with TOS [Thousands Standing Around], multiple check points, hand scanners, emptying luggage and sending it through radar machines, these scissors were completely missed.  With that same pair of scissors in the same place in my briefcase, I traveled throughout England; the Republic of Ireland; Northern Ireland; Frankfurt, Germany; Tallin, Estonia; Riga, Latvia; St. Petersberg, Russia; Schiphol, Holland; and St. Tropez, France; without a single problem.   On only three occasions outside the U.S. was my bag scanned before boarding the plane, and if they spotted those scissors [which I'm sure they did], they said nothing because it means nothing.  Traveling between former "Iron Curtain" countries like Latvia, and the "Iron" Russia still makes me nervous, but not even they worried about scissors.

What's ironic is that all of this "lack of security" made me feel MUCH more secure, whereas the psychological impact of being roughed up by federally appointed thugs made me feel much LESS secure.  This opinion is supported by the FACT that none of these countries have suffered from "terrorism" even though we, WITH all of this "security", THOUSANDS of miles away from the alleged source of that terror, BILLIONS of dollars into this putataive "war on terror", are still such "victims" of "terror".

So, it should come as no surprise to you that on the last leg of this journey, carrying the same briefcase, while embarking on a fully loaded Airbus which I had just flown from Schiphol to Minneapolis with no problems, my crime was discovered.  You've seen or heard about the theatrics of such criminal investigations, but let me delight in describing their reaction.  They held my office scissors menacingly to my face as if though they had proof I was a terrorist, as a number of huge thugs movedin behind me.   In the politest language and tone I could muster, I said "hey, I've traveled all over Europe with those scisors and nobody said a word".  Well, don't threaten the job security of thugs when THEY have the "law" on their side, AND my scissors, even politely.  They had obviously been trained to provoke passengers for the express purpose of justifying and expanding their role in our "security".  Most people don't like to talk about having their body rubbed by strangers they don't know, and neither do I, but needless to say it's always a degrading experience.  Because I wasn't the submissive mouse these cats love to toy with, they raised their voices and made a big issue about removing my shoes, proving to other passengers that they were being protected.

I was then invited to donate my scissors to their cause, or pay $10 to ship them home.   Since I paid $2.00 for a pack of three, and still had the other two [see attached picture], these well-traveled, and "dangerous", scissors are now in TOS' arsenal.

But they weren't done. Upon arrival in LAX, I was one of the first of 485 passengers to disembark, but 4 hours later, the very last to get my last bag.  All of the other bags had arrived with everything else, but another one [not the one with the scissors in it] had mysteriously disappeared.  Then came the cryptic announcement: "passenger ....., the bag you lost in Cairo is now in the pilot's cabin".   Well, I hadn't been to Cairo, and wondered why it would be in the "pilot's cabin", so I went to customer service, only to find it there.  I asked about "Cairo" and the "pilot's cabin" and they seemed as perplexed as me [or at least they put on a good show].

So what is this all about?  Security?  I don't think so.  This is all about using 911 as a club to bash us over the head and remove the last of our Constitutional rights, not the least of which is the right to travel.