Kol Nidre and The Star of David
By Willie Martin

Jew Watch

    If you have ever had any business dealings with the Jews you probably noticed that they very seldom kept their word, even a written contract, in the business you conducted with them. Well the reason that their word is not worth a plug nickel, so-to-speak, is because of the Kol Nidre Oath they take every year when they celebrate the Day of Atonement.

    Kol Nidre: It is the prologue of the Day of Atonement services in the synagogues. It is recited three times by the standing congregation in concert with chanting rabbis at the alter. After the recital of the "Kol Nidre" (All Vows) prayer the Day of Atonement religious ceremonies follow immediately. The Day of Atonement religious observances are the highest holy days of the "Jews" and are celebrated as such throughout the world. The official translation into English of the "Kol Nidre" (All Vows) prayer is as follows: "ALL VOWS, OBLIGATIONS, OATHS, ANATHEMAS, whether called 'konam,' 'konas,' or by any other name, WHICH WE MAY VOW, OR SWEAR, OR PLEDGE, OR WHEREBY WE MAY BE BOUND, FROM THIS DAY OF ATONEMENT UNTO THE NEXT, (whose happy coming we await), we do repent. MAY THEY BE DEEMED ABSOLVED, FORGIVEN, ANNULLED, AND VOID AND MADE OF NO EFFECT; THEY SHALL NOT BIND US NOR HAVE POWER OVER US. THE VOWS SHALL NOT BE RECKONED VOWS; THE OBLIGATIONS SHALL NOT BE OBLIGATORY; NOR THE OATHS BE OATHS."

    The implications, inferences and innuendoes of the "Kol Nidre" (All Vows) prayer are referred to in the Talmud in the Book of Nedarim, 23a-23b as follows: "And he who desires that NONE OF HIS VOWS MADE DURING THE YEAR SHALL BE VALID, let him stand at the beginning of the year and declare, EVERY VOW WHICH I MAKE IN THE FUTURE SHALL BE NULL (1). (HIS VOWS ARE THEN INVALID) PROVIDING THAT HE REMEMBERS THIS AT THE TIME OF THE VOW." (Emphasis in original) A footnote (1) relates: "(1)...THE LAW OF REVOCATION IN ADVANCE WAS NOT MADE PUBLIC." (Emphasis in original text)

    The greatest study of the "Kol Nidre" (All Vows) prayer was made by Theodor Reik, a pupil of the [I]nfamous Jewish Dr. Sigmund Freud. The analysis of the historic, religious and psychological background of the "Kol Nidre" (All Vows) prayer by Professor Reik presents the Talmud in its true perspective. This study is contained in "The Ritual, Psycho-Analytical Studies." In the chapter on the Talmud, page 163, he states: "THE TEXT WAS TO THE EFFECT THAT ALL OATHS WHICH BELIEVERS TAKE BETWEEN ONE DAY OF ATONEMENT AND THE NEXT DAY OF ATONEMENT ARE DECLARED INVALID."

    The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia confirms that the "Kol Nidre" (All Vows) prayer has no spiritual value as might be believed because it is recited in synagogues on the Day of Atonement as the prologue of the religious ceremonies which follow it. The SECULAR significance of the "Kol Nidre" (All Vows) prayer is forcefully indicated by the analysis in Vol. VI, page 441: "The Kol Nidre HAS NOTHING WHATEVER TO DO WITH THE ACTUAL IDEA OF THE DAY OF ATONEMENT...it attained to extraordinary solemnity and popularity by reason of the fact that it was THE FIRST PRAYER RECITED ON THIS HOLIEST OF DAYS."

    Being amazed at this revelation on about the Kol Nidre, I happened to notice in the index the "Star of David." So I decided to look it up and see what the Jewish Encyclopedia had to say about it and found the following.

The Star of David

    The "Sacred" Star of David: Non-Jews have been drenched with propaganda that the six-pointed "Star of David" is a sacred symbol of Jewry, dating from David and Solomon, in Biblical times, and signifying the pure "monotheism" of the Jewish religion. In actuality, the six-pointed star, called "David's Shield," or "Magen David," was only adopted as a Jewish device in 1873, by the American Jewish Publication Society, it is not even mentioned in rabbinical literature.

    Magen Dawid ("David’s Shield" - The Star of David): "The hexagram formed by the combination of two equilateral triangles ; used as the symbol of Judaism. It is placed upon synagogues, sacred vessels, and the like, and was adopted as a device by the American Publication Society in 1873, the Zionist Congress of Basel, hence by 'Die Welt (Vienna), the official organ of Zionism, and by other bodies.

    The hebra kaddisha of the Jewish community of Johannesburg, South Africa, calls itself 'Hebra Kaddisha zum Rothn Magen David,' following the designation of the 'red cross' societies...IT IS NOTEWORTHY, MOREOVER, THAT THE SHIELD OF DAVID IS NOT MENTIONED IN RABBINICAL LITERATURE.

    The 'Magen Dawid,' therefore, probably did not originate within Rabbinism, the official and dominant Judaism for more than 2,000 years. Nevertheless a David's shield has recently been noted on a Jewish tombstone at Tarentum, in southern Italy, which may date as early as the third century of the common era. The earliest Jewish literary source which mentions it, the 'Eshkol ha-Kofer' of the karaite Judah Hadassi (middle of the 12th cent.) says, inch. 242: 'Seven names of angels precede the mezuzah: Michael, Garield, etc...Tetragrammation protect thee!

    And likewise the sign called 'David's shield' is placed besides the name of each angel.' It was therefore, at this time a sign on amulets. In the magic papyri of antiquity, pentagrams, together with stars and other signs, are frequently found on amulets bearing the Jewish names of God, 'Sabaoth,' 'Adonai,' 'Eloai,' and used to guard against fever and other diseases. Curiously enough, only the pentacle appears, not the hexagram. In the great magic papyrus at Paris and London there are twenty-two signs sided by side, and a circle with twelve signs, but NEITHER A PENTACLE NOR A HEXAGRAM (Wessely, i.e. pp. 31, 112), although there is a triangle, perhaps in place of the latter.

    In the many illustrations of amulets given by Budge in his 'Egyptian Magic' (London, 1899) NOT A SINGLE PENTACLE OR HEXAGRAM APPEARS. THE SYNCRETISM OF HELLENISTIC, JEWISH, AND COPTIC INFLUENCES DID NOT THEREFORE, ORIGINATE THE SYMBOL. IT IS PROBABLE THAT IT WAS THE CABALA THAT DERIVED THE SYMBOL FROM THE TEMPLARS. THE CABALA, IN FACT, MAKES USE OF THIS SIGN, ARRANGING THE TEN SEFIROT, or spheres, in it, and placing in on AMULETS. The pentagram, called Solomon's seal, is also used as a talisman, and HENRY THINKS THAT THE HINDUS DERIVED IT FROM THE SEMITES [Here is another case where the Jews admit they are not Semites. Can you not see it? The Jew Henry thinks it was derived originally FROM THE SEMITES! Here is a Jew admitting that THE JEWS ARE NOT SEMITES!] ('Magic dans l'lude Antique,' p. 93, Paris, 1904), although the name by no means proves the Jewish or Semitic origin of the sign. The Hindus likewise employed the hexagram as a means of protection, and as such it is mentioned in the earliest source, quoted above. In the synagogues, perhaps, it took the place of the mezuzah, and the name 'SHIELD OF DAVID' MAY HAVE BEEN GIVEN IT IN VIRTUE OF ITS PROTECTIVE POWERS. The hexagram may have been employed originally also as an architectural ornament on synagogues, as it is, for example, on the cathedrals of Brandenburg and Stendal, and on the Marktkirche at Hanover.

    A pentacle in this form, (a five pointed star is shown here), is found on the ancient synagogue at Tell Hum. Charles IV, prescribed for the Jews of Prague, in 1354, A RED FLAG WITH BOTH DAVID'S SHIELD AND SOLOMON'S SEAL, WHILE THE RED FLAG WITH WHICH THE JEWS MET KING MATTHIAS OF HUNGARY in the fifteenth century showed two pentacles with two golden stars. The pentacle, therefore, may also have been used among the Jews. It occurs in a manuscript as early as the year 1073. However, the six-pointed star has been used for centuries for magic amulets and cabalistic sorcery." (See pages 548, 549 and 550 of the Jewish Encyclopedia)
 

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