The Biblical Gospel
Parts 7 through 12
By Willie Martin

Jew Watch

The Biblical Gospel - Part 7

 Isaiah 53 not only speaks of Christ who was "despised and rejected of men" (Isaiah 53:3) as not "esteemed" by Israel (Isaiah 53:3), but that He bore Israel's "griefs" (Isaiah 53:4) and "was wounded" for Israel's "transgressions... bruised for" Israel's "iniquities." (Isaiah 53:5) In relation to their God, Israel was like "sheep" that "have gone astray." (Isaiah 53:6) The Jesus revealed in Isaiah 53 was the One who "bare the sins of many" of Israel. (Isaiah 53;12) His sacrifice was the essence of the "good tidings and salvation...unto Zion." (Isaiah 52:7) Isaiah reveals that this suffering Servant, Jesus, was the One who would die for Israel.

 Again why would the eunuch of Ethiopia apply the text of Isaiah 53:7-8 to himself being a Negro, or Philip take the time to preach to him, if the eunuch was not one of the contextual recipients of Christ's sacrificial work? It does not make sense unless, of course, the Israelites were Negroes, which we know was/is not the case.

 If, however, the Israelites were of the White Adamic race and the eunuch was also an Israelite, then this gospel message would be meant for him, as well as all the rest of the White descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The gospel was/is for Israelite people (not to be confused with contempory "jews"). The context of both Acts 8 and Isaiah 53 demand it.

 The Gospel in Romans: The Context of Romans 10:14-16: One of the favorite set of verses that has inspired many a Judeo-Christian to go to the foreign mission field is found in Romans 10:14-16: "How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher? And how shall they preach, except they be sent? As it is written. How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tiding of good things! But they have not all obeyed the gospel. For Esaias saith, Lord, who hath believed our report?"

 One of the reasons that this passage is viewed as universally applicable to all people of all races is from its immediate context. For example, Romans 10:8-13 states: "But what saith it? The word is night thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach. That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved."

 Interpreted from a Judeo-universal context, the words "whosoever," and "there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek," and "all who call upon him" mean every race of people on the face of the planet earth. This all-inclusive interpretation is then carried over into verses 14-16, which is the text under consideration, thus rendering the "gospel" as universal in application.

 However, when the surrounding context of Paul's words here is taken into account, the "gospel" assumes a very narrow meaning in terms of its intended recipients. For example, in chapters 9-11, Paul discusses the response of both "Israel," represented by "the Jews" or the house of Judah, and "the Gentiles" represented by the scattered and divorced house of Israel. Paul clarifies the identity of "the Gentiles" in 9:24-26 by quoting from Hosea 2:23 and 1:10. Look at the comparison of these two texts:

 "Even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles? As he saith also in Osee (Hosea), I will all them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved which was not beloved. And it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people; there shall they be called the children of the living God." (Romans 9:24-26)

 "And I will sow her unto me in the earth; and I will have mercy upon her that had not obtained mercy; and I will say to them which were not my people, Thou art my people; and they shall say, Thou art my God." (Hosea 2:23)

 "Yet the number of the children of Israel shall be as the and of the sea, which cannot be measured nor numbered: and it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people, there it shall be said unto them. Ye are the sons of the living God." (Hosea 1:10)

 The context of Hosea was clearly referencing "the house of Israel," on whom God would have "no more mercy," (Hosea 1:6) with those who were not His "people." (Hosea 1:9) Although God would have "mercy upon the house of Judah," (Hosea 1:7) He would divorce the house of Israel, (Jeremiah 3:8 is one of the Biblical references that tell us that the Lord gave the house of Israel a "bill of divorce.") remove them from the land of Canaan and scatter them among the nations (or Gentiles). Thus, in Romans 9-11, the "Jews" were the house of Judah and the "Gentiles" were the house of Israel.

 Paul is saying in Romans 10:12 that "there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek," (i.e., a Greek speaking Gentile) not only because they are of the same racial stock, but they are also equal recipients of the righteousness offered through Jesus Christ by believing on Him through the gospel message.

 If the "whosoever" of Romans 10:11-13 includes both "Jew" (Judean) and "Greek," then we should have a consistent identification of these two groups as comprising Adamic Israel only. In romans 10-11, Paul quotes from Isaiah 28:16 referring to the Lord laying "in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone" for "he that believeth." Of course, the "stone" refers to Christ (Matthew 21:43) and the context of Isaiah 28 reveals that "he that believeth" is comprised only of "Ephraim." ("Ephraim" was another name for the ten-tribed house of Israel who resided in the north of the house of Judah (Isaiah 7:8-9; 11:13; Jeremiah 7:15; 31:9; and Ezekiel 37:16-19 and Isaiah 28:1) and Judah . (Isaiah 28:7-14)

 In Romans 10:13, Paul uses the words from Joel 2:32 which identifies the "whosoever" as only those of Israel. Joel is specifically prophesying to those of Israel "In Zion" (Joel 2:15) who are "the people" of "the congregation." (Joel 2:16) They are the "children of Zion" (Joel 2:23) and His "people (Joel 2:26-27) who are the "sons and...daughters" (Joel 2:28) to whom is prophesied the blessing at Pentecost. (Acts 2:16-21) They include only those "in Jerusalem" (Joel 2:32) and those of the lost sheep of the house of Israel who "have scattered among the nations." (Joel 3:2) The "whosoever" of Romans 10:13, therefore, does not include those of other races, but only Israelites who now also comprise many nations.

 Further, in the verses preceding Romans 10:11-13, Paul wrote: "But the righteousness which is of faith speaketh on this wise. Say not in thine heart, Who shall ascend into heaven? (That is, to bring Christ down from above:) Or, Who shall descend into the deep" (that is, to bring up Christ again from the dead) But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach..." (Romans 10:6-8)

The Biblical Gospel - Part 8

 Paul quotes here from Deuteronomy 30:12-14 which, in context, refers exclusively to the people of Israel, the descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. (Deuteronomy 30:20) Here Moses exhorts them to "hearken unto the voice of the Lord thy God, to keep his commandments and his statutes which are written in his book of the law (According to the testimony of the Scriptures in Psalm 147:19-20 only Israel was given the law)...for this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off." (Deuteronomy 30:10-11) Is there any justification to believe that Paul had anyone else in mind when he included these verses from Deuteronomy than Israel alone? Certainly not!

 The context in Romans and its related Old Testament passages conclude that "the gospel" of Romans 10:14-16 applies only to Israel. However, our study must go further now to include the Old Testament context of Paul's words in Romans 10:14-16.

 The Context of Isaiah 52:7 and 53:1: Some of Paul's words in Romans 10:14-16 are taken form two related texts in Isaiah:

 "How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation: that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth!" (Isaiah 52:7)

 "Who hath believed our report? And to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?" (Isaiah 53:1)

 The surrounding context of Isaiah once again clarifies to whom these texts and the "good tiding" apply. They belong to those who are the genetic descendants of "Abraham" and "Sarah" (Isaiah 51:2) who are God's "people" and His "nation." (Isaiah 51:4) These are the "people in whose heart is" God's "law" (Isaiah 51:7) who first hear the "good tidings" (Isaiah 52:7) in "Jerusalem." (Isaiah 52:1-2, 9)

 Through the "good tidings" even "many nations" (Isaiah 52:15) of Israel shall be sprinkled with the blood of Christ who is their suffering "servant." (Isaiah 52:13) He is the one who bore their "griefs, and...sorrows" (Isaiah 53:4) and "was wounded for" Israel's "transgressions" and "bruised for" her "iniquities." (Isaiah 52:5) It is He that is Israel's "husband" and "Redeemer." (Isaiah 54:5) To whom then, were the "good tidings' published and to whom was "the arm of the Lord revealed?" The context of Isaiah reveals that it was only to Israel. To them belongs the "gospel" message that Paul writes about in Romans 10:14-16.

 The Gospel in Ephesians: The Context of Ephesians 2:17: Who was the Apostle Paul speaking of when he stated the following? "And (Christ) came and preached (euangelizo: Strong's #2097) peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were night." (Ephesians 2:17)

 The context reveals that Jesus Christ "preached peace" to the "Gentiles (Ephesians 2:11) who were "without Christ" (Ephesians 2:12) and "far off," (Ephesians 2:13) but by virtue of the gospel were now "made night" by the blood of Christ. (Ephesians 2:13) These "Genitals" were the house of Israel scattered among the nations who were also historically at "enmity" with the house of Judah. One of the great purposes of the gospel was that Jesus Christ, being the righteousness of God, would be the "peace" (Ephesians 2:14) between both houses in order to "reconcile" both to God (Ephesians 2:16) to bring them together again "in one body." (Ephesians 2:16) Those who had the gospel preached to them were those who were the "Genitals" or the house of Israel ("afar off") and those who were the Israelites of the house of Judah ("that were nigh").

 In the wider context, Paul addresses the Ephesian believers (both Gentile and Judean) as the "chosen" of God (Ephesians 1:4) and the "predestinated" (Ephesians 1:5) in which they also posses "redemption through his blood." (Ephesians 1:7) Both parties are a part of the "members of" Christ's "body" (Ephesians 5:30) and thus the wife of the Lord (Ephesians 5:31-32). Further, they are together called "brethren." (Ephesians 6:23) All the above terms have meaning and application to only one race of people; Adamic Israel. (You can find a complete Biblical analysis of these terms as they relate to Israel in Lawrence Blanchard's book, Standing On The Premises)

 Thus, the gospel of Ephesians 2:17 does not refer to other races, but exclusively to one kindred of people within the context of Ephesians: Israel. However, a second witness is found as to the exclusive nature of the gospel as a fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy.

 The Context of Isaiah 57:19: There are a number of Old Testament references to one or both of the phrases "far off" and "near" or "nigh." Isaiah 57:19 represents the closest wording to Ephesians 2:17: "I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the Lord; and I will heal him." (Isaiah 57:19)

 According to the context of this verse in Isaiah, who are the "far off" and "near?" The prophet is speaking of Israel, figuratively represented as the "sheep," (Isaiah 53:6) "the children of the desolate" and "the children of the married wife," (Isaiah 54:1) "a woman forsaken," (Isaiah 54:6) the Israel whose "husband" is the Lord, (Isaiah 54:5) the subjects of the "everlasting covenant," (Isaiah 55:3) the "outcasts of Israel," (Isaiah 56:8) "my people," (Isaiah 58:1) the nation "of Jacob thy father" (Isaiah 58:14) and "Gentiles" who "gather themselves together" as "sons" that "come from far." (Isaiah 60:3-4)

 This context is loaded with references to indicate that the "far off' and "near' are the children of Israel. Particularly, the "far off" are the "Gentiles" (the house of Israel) who have "come from far" because they were as a "woman forsaken" and the scattered "outcasts of Israel." There is no hint that other races are represented as those who were considered "far off." Only Israel. The "near" included the local residents of the house of Judah who were living in Judea.

 The identity of the "far off" and "near" is confirmed in the first explicit announcement of the New Testament fulfillment of Isaiah 57:19 (along with Joel 2:28). This is found in Acts 2:39: "For the promise is unto you (the "near"), and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the lord our God shall call."

 At the first recorded preaching of the gospel after Christ's ascension, Peter addresses the "men of Judea" and those "that dwell at Jerusalem," (Acts 2:14) the "men of Israel" (Acts 2:22) and "brethren" (Acts 2:9-11) They were called to "repent and be baptized...for the remission of sins," (Acts 2:38) which would only apply to Israel who had understood that they had transgressed the Law under the Old Covenant (1 John 3:4 and Hebrews 9:15) and had therefore sinned. The "promise" (Acts 2:39) of "the remission of sins" and "the gift of the Holy Ghost" (Acts 2:38) was to Israel alone.

 Additionally, the promise in Acts was to Israel's "children" (of the house of Judah) and to those of Israel that were "afar off." (Acts 2:39) That those "afar off" are only Israelites is confirmed in the prophetic promise of Joel 2:28-32 by the specific designations of Israel's "sons and... daughters" (Joel 2:28) and those who came to "mount Zion and in Jerusalem" (at Pentecost, Acts 2:9-11) of "the remnant' (Joel 2:32) of Israel.

The Biblical Gospel - Part 9

 Isaiah 53 not only speaks of Christ who was "despised and rejected of men" (Isaiah 53:3) as not "esteemed" by Israel (Isaiah 53:3), but that He bore Israel's "griefs" (Isaiah 53:4) and "was wounded" for Israel's "transgressions... bruised for" Israel's "iniquities." (Isaiah 53:5) In relation to their God, Israel was like "sheep" that "have gone astray." (Isaiah 53:6) The Jesus revealed in Isaiah 53 was the One who "bare the sins of many" of Israel. (Isaiah 53;12) His sacrifice was the essence of the "good tidings and salvation...unto Zion." (Isaiah 52:7) Isaiah reveals that this suffering Servant, Jesus, was the One who would die for Israel.

 Again why would the eunuch of Ethiopia apply the text of Isaiah 53:7-8 to himself being a Negro, or Philip take the time to preach to him, if the eunuch was not one of the contextual recipients of Christ's sacrificial work? It does not make sense unless, of course, the Israelites were Negroes, which we know was/is not the case.

 If, however, the Israelites were of the White Adamic race and the eunuch was also an Israelite, then this gospel message would be meant for him, as well as all the rest of the White descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The gospel was/is for Israelite people (not to be confused with contempory "jews"). The context of both Acts 8 and Isaiah 53 demand it.

 The Gospel in Romans: The Context of Romans 10:14-16: One of the favorite set of verses that has inspired many a Judeo-Christian to go to the foreign mission field is found in Romans 10:14-16: "How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher? And how shall they preach, except they be sent? As it is written. How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tiding of good things! But they have not all obeyed the gospel. For Esaias saith, Lord, who hath believed our report?"

 One of the reasons that this passage is viewed as universally applicable to all people of all races is from its immediate context. For example, Romans 10:8-13 states: "But what saith it? The word is night thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach. That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved."

 Interpreted from a Judeo-universal context, the words "whosoever," and "there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek," and "all who call upon him" mean every race of people on the face of the planet earth. This all-inclusive interpretation is then carried over into verses 14-16, which is the text under consideration, thus rendering the "gospel" as universal in application.

 However, when the surrounding context of Paul's words here is taken into account, the "gospel" assumes a very narrow meaning in terms of its intended recipients. For example, in chapters 9-11, Paul discusses the response of both "Israel," represented by "the Jews" or the house of Judah, and "the Gentiles" represented by the scattered and divorced house of Israel. Paul clarifies the identity of "the Gentiles" in 9:24-26 by quoting from Hosea 2:23 and 1:10. Look at the comparison of these two texts:

 "Even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles? As he saith also in Osee (Hosea), I will all them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved which was not beloved. And it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people; there shall they be called the children of the living God." (Romans 9:24-26)

 "And I will sow her unto me in the earth; and I will have mercy upon her that had not obtained mercy; and I will say to them which were not my people, Thou art my people; and they shall say, Thou art my God." (Hosea 2:23)

 "Yet the number of the children of Israel shall be as the and of the sea, which cannot be measured nor numbered: and it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people, there it shall be said unto them. Ye are the sons of the living God." (Hosea 1:10)

 The context of Hosea was clearly referencing "the house of Israel," on whom God would have "no more mercy," (Hosea 1:6) with those who were not His "people." (Hosea 1:9) Although God would have "mercy upon the house of Judah," (Hosea 1:7) He would divorce the house of Israel, (Jeremiah 3:8 is one of the Biblical references that tell us that the Lord gave the house of Israel a "bill of divorce.") remove them from the land of Canaan and scatter them among the nations (or Gentiles). Thus, in Romans 9-11, the "Jews" were the house of Judah and the "Gentiles" were the house of Israel.

 Paul is saying in Romans 10:12 that "there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek," (i.e., a Greek speaking Gentile) not only because they are of the same racial stock, but they are also equal recipients of the righteousness offered through Jesus Christ by believing on Him through the gospel message.

 If the "whosoever" of Romans 10:11-13 includes both "Jew" (Judean) and "Greek," then we should have a consistent identification of these two groups as comprising Adamic Israel only. In romans 10-11, Paul quotes from Isaiah 28:16 referring to the Lord laying "in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone" for "he that believeth." Of course, the "stone" refers to Christ (Matthew 21:43) and the context of Isaiah 28 reveals that "he that believeth" is comprised only of "Ephraim." ("Ephraim" was another name for the ten-tribed house of Israel who resided in the north of the house of Judah (Isaiah 7:8-9; 11:13; Jeremiah 7:15; 31:9; and Ezekiel 37:16-19 and Isaiah 28:1) and Judah . (Isaiah 28:7-14)

 In Romans 10:13, Paul uses the words from Joel 2:32 which identifies the "whosoever" as only those of Israel. Joel is specifically prophesying to those of Israel "In Zion" (Joel 2:15) who are "the people" of "the congregation." (Joel 2:16) They are the "children of Zion" (Joel 2:23) and His "people (Joel 2:26-27) who are the "sons and...daughters" (Joel 2:28) to whom is prophesied the blessing at Pentecost. (Acts 2:16-21) They include only those "in Jerusalem" (Joel 2:32) and those of the lost sheep of the house of Israel who "have scattered among the nations." (Joel 3:2) The "whosoever" of Romans 10:13, therefore, does not include those of other races, but only Israelites who now also comprise many nations.

The Biblical Gospel - Part 10

 Further, in the verses preceding Romans 10:11-13, Paul wrote: "But the righteousness which is of faith speaketh on this wise. Say not in thine heart, Who shall ascend into heaven? (That is, to bring Christ down from above:) Or, Who shall descend into the deep" (that is, to bring up Christ again from the dead) But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach..." (Romans 10:6-8)

 Paul quotes here from Deuteronomy 30:12-14 which, in context, refers exclusively to the people of Israel, the descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. (Deuteronomy 30:20) Here Moses exhorts them to "hearken unto the voice of the Lord thy God, to keep his commandments and his statutes which are written in his book of the law (According to the testimony of the Scriptures in Psalm 147:19-20 only Israel was given the law)...for this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off." (Deuteronomy 30:10-11) Is there any justification to believe that Paul had anyone else in mind when he included these verses from Deuteronomy than Israel alone? Certainly not!

 The context in Romans and its related Old Testament passages conclude that "the gospel" of Romans 10:14-16 applies only to Israel. However, our study must go further now to include the Old Testament context of Paul's words in Romans 10:14-16.

 The Context of Isaiah 52:7 and 53:1: Some of Paul's words in Romans 10:14-16 are taken form two related texts in Isaiah:

 "How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation: that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth!" (Isaiah 52:7)

 "Who hath believed our report? And to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?" (Isaiah 53:1)

 The surrounding context of Isaiah once again clarifies to whom these texts and the "good tiding" apply. They belong to those who are the genetic descendants of "Abraham" and "Sarah" (Isaiah 51:2) who are God's "people" and His "nation." (Isaiah 51:4) These are the "people in whose heart is" God's "law" (Isaiah 51:7) who first hear the "good tidings" (Isaiah 52:7) in "Jerusalem." (Isaiah 52:1-2, 9)

 Through the "good tidings" even "many nations" (Isaiah 52:15) of Israel shall be sprinkled with the blood of Christ who is their suffering "servant." (Isaiah 52:13) He is the one who bore their "griefs, and...sorrows" (Isaiah 53:4) and "was wounded for" Israel's "transgressions" and "bruised for" her "iniquities." (Isaiah 52:5) It is He that is Israel's "husband" and "Redeemer." (Isaiah 54:5) To whom then, were the "good tidings' published and to whom was "the arm of the Lord revealed?" The context of Isaiah reveals that it was only to Israel. To them belongs the "gospel" message that Paul writes about in Romans 10:14-16.

 The Gospel in Ephesians: The Context of Ephesians 2:17: Who was the Apostle Paul speaking of when he stated the following? "And (Christ) came and preached (euangelizo: Strong's #2097) peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were night." (Ephesians 2:17)

 The context reveals that Jesus Christ "preached peace" to the "Gentiles (Ephesians 2:11) who were "without Christ" (Ephesians 2:12) and "far off," (Ephesians 2:13) but by virtue of the gospel were now "made night" by the blood of Christ. (Ephesians 2:13) These "Genitals" were the house of Israel scattered among the nations who were also historically at "enmity" with the house of Judah. One of the great purposes of the gospel was that Jesus Christ, being the righteousness of God, would be the "peace" (Ephesians 2:14) between both houses in order to "reconcile" both to God (Ephesians 2:16) to bring them together again "in one body." (Ephesians 2:16) Those who had the gospel preached to them were those who were the "Genitals" or the house of Israel ("afar off") and those who were the Israelites of the house of Judah ("that were nigh").

 In the wider context, Paul addresses the Ephesian believers (both Gentile and Judean) as the "chosen" of God (Ephesians 1:4) and the "predestinated" (Ephesians 1:5) in which they also posses "redemption through his blood." (Ephesians 1:7) Both parties are a part of the "members of" Christ's "body" (Ephesians 5:30) and thus the wife of the Lord (Ephesians 5:31-32). Further, they are together called "brethren." (Ephesians 6:23) All the above terms have meaning and application to only one race of people; Adamic Israel. (You can find a complete Biblical analysis of these terms as they relate to Israel in Lawrence Blanchard's book, Standing On The Premises)

 Thus, the gospel of Ephesians 2:17 does not refer to other races, but exclusively to one kindred of people within the context of Ephesians: Israel. However, a second witness is found as to the exclusive nature of the gospel as a fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy.

 The Context of Isaiah 57:19: There are a number of Old Testament references to one or both of the phrases "far off" and "near" or "nigh." Isaiah 57:19 represents the closest wording to Ephesians 2:17: "I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the Lord; and I will heal him." (Isaiah 57:19)

 According to the context of this verse in Isaiah, who are the "far off" and "near?" The prophet is speaking of Israel, figuratively represented as the "sheep," (Isaiah 53:6) "the children of the desolate" and "the children of the married wife," (Isaiah 54:1) "a woman forsaken," (Isaiah 54:6) the Israel whose "husband" is the Lord, (Isaiah 54:5) the subjects of the "everlasting covenant," (Isaiah 55:3) the "outcasts of Israel," (Isaiah 56:8) "my people," (Isaiah 58:1) the nation "of Jacob thy father" (Isaiah 58:14) and "Gentiles" who "gather themselves together" as "sons" that "come from far." (Isaiah 60:3-4)

 This context is loaded with references to indicate that the "far off' and "near' are the children of Israel. Particularly, the "far off" are the "Gentiles" (the house of Israel) who have "come from far" because they were as a "woman forsaken" and the scattered "outcasts of Israel." There is no hint that other races are represented as those who were considered "far off." Only Israel. The "near" included the local residents of the house of Judah who were living in Judea.

 The identity of the "far off" and "near" is confirmed in the first explicit announcement of the New Testament fulfillment of Isaiah 57:19 (along with Joel 2:28). This is found in Acts 2:39: "For the promise is unto you (the "near"), and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the lord our God shall call."

The Biblical Gospel - Part 11

 At the first recorded preaching of the gospel after Christ's ascension, Peter addresses the "men of Judea" and those "that dwell at Jerusalem," (Acts 2:14) the "men of Israel" (Acts 2:22) and "brethren" (Acts 2:9-11) They were called to "repent and be baptized...for the remission of sins," (Acts 2:38) which would only apply to Israel who had understood that they had transgressed the Law under the Old Covenant (1 John 3:4 and Hebrews 9:15) and had therefore sinned. The "promise" (Acts 2:39) of "the remission of sins" and "the gift of the Holy Ghost" (Acts 2:38) was to Israel alone.

 Additionally, the promise in Acts was to Israel's "children" (of the house of Judah) and to those of Israel that were "afar off." (Acts 2:39) That those "afar off" are only Israelites is confirmed in the prophetic promise of Joel 2:28-32 by the specific designations of Israel's "sons and... daughters" (Joel 2:28) and those who came to "mount Zion and in Jerusalem" (at Pentecost, Acts 2:9-11) of "the remnant' (Joel 2:32) of Israel.

 There are other Old Testament references that identify the northern house of Israel as those who were "far off," such as Ezekiel 11:15-17. They are the prophet's "brethren, the men of thy kindred" (Ezekiel 11:15) who were "scattered" among the countries of the "heathen," (Ezekiel 11:16-17, or Gentiles, or nations) They were gathered together by the Lord under the New covenant in order to give them "a heart of flesh" so that they would be His "people." (Ezekiel 11:19-20)

 Finally, Daniel 9:7 plainly identifies the "near" and the "far off" as Israel of both houses: "O Lord, righteousness belongeth unto thee, but unto us confusion of faces, as at this day; to the men of Judah, and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and unto all Israel that are near, and that are far off, through all the countries whither thou hast driven them, because of their trespass that they have trespassed against thee."

 In Daniel's prayer of intercession for his people Israel, he makes it evident that "the men of Judah, and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and unto all Israel" are the ones who are "near" and "far off." That is, there were some of the house of Judah and a few of the house of Israel that were in the Babylonian captivity (the "near"), and those of both houses that were also scattered "through all the countries" where God had "driven them." (Along with the house of Israel, Sennacherib's Tablets (Luekenbill, Ancient Records Of Assyria And Babylon) disclose that over 200,000 men of the house of Judah (Judah and Benjamin) were also taken captive by Assyria (referred to as the "fenced cities" recorded in 2 Kings 18:13). Thus, all twelve tribes were represented in the dispersion) Obviously, only Israel is in view here as comprising the "near" and the "far off." The Bible is consistent in this designation of Israel.

 Although there are other Old Testament passages which tie together one or more words or phrases of Ephesians 2:11 with the "near" and "far off" of Israel, the conclusion based on the evidence resented thus far is that the preaching of the gospel relates only to Israel, some of whom were also called "Gentiles" who were"afar off." They were the dispersed house of Israel mainly (along with a good portion of the house of Judah), the twelve tribes who were scattered and resided among other Adamic nations. Therefore, the gospel here does not include other races who also happened to be elsewhere around the globe, but only those of Israel who were "near" and "far off."

 The Gospel in 1 Peter: The Context of 1 Peter 1:24-25: "For all flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of grass. The grass withereth, and the flower thereof fadeth away: But the word of the Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the gospel is preached (euangelizo: Strong's #2097) unto you. " (1 Peter 1:24-25)

 1 Peter is addressed "to the strangers scattered..." (1 Peter 1:1). The word "scattered" is the Greek word diaspora (Strong's #1290) which means "dispersion, i.e...the (converted) Israel resident in Gentile countries." This is the same word used in James 1:1 to refer to "the twelve tribes (of Israel) which are scattered abroad." So we can clearly see that Peter was writing to dispersed Israelites.

 Peter also calls them "elect" (1 Peter 1:2), recipients of the "salvation" spoken of by "the prophets" of the Old Testament (1 Peter 1:10), and the "redeemed," (1 Peter 1:18) which all refer back to physical Israel. Further, Peter's readers are identified as "a holy priesthood," (1 Peter 2:5) "a holy nation," (1 Peter 2:9) and "a peculiar people," (1 Peter 2:9) which likewise are all designations for Israel (see Exodus 19:5-6). According to the context of 1 Peter then, it was to Israel that this "gospel," found in 1 Peter 1:25, was preached and by which they were "born again." (1 Peter 1:23)

 Notice that in 1 Peter 1:25, "the word of the Lord" is directly connected to the word that was preached "by the gospel." the Greek grammar indicates that "the word of the Lord" and "the gospel" that was preached are one and the same. Literally, it reads, "but this is the word which was preached to you." According to 1 Peter 1:25, "the word which by the gospel" was "preached" was the same "word" referred to also in the Old Testament passage of Isaiah 40:6-8.

 The Context of Isaiah 40:6-8: "The voice said, Cry. And he said, What shall I cry? All flesh is grass, and all the godliness thereof is as the flower of the field: The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: because the spirit of the Lord bloweth upon it: surely the people is grass. The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever."

 The context of the above passage concerns a message of the prophet to "Jerusalem" (Isaiah 40:2) and "the cities of Judah" (Isaiah 40:9) in which lived Judean Israelites. Additionally, Isaiah prophecies that God will "feed his flock like a shepherd" (Isaiah 40:11) referring to a wider audience than just Israelites from Judah. The word "flock" throughout both the Old and New Testaments always refers to all Israel and only to Israel, and "shepherd" to Israel's God, Jesus Christ (see also John 10:1-18). (A complete treatment of these metaphors can be found in the book, Standing On The Premises).

 That Isaiah 40 is speaking to all Israel is confirmed by the familiar prophecy of Isaiah 40:3. "The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness. Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God."

 This prophecy about John the Baptist as the forerunner of Jesus Christ was fulfilled in the context of the New Testament in Matthew 3:3; Mark 1:3; Luke 1:76; 3:4 and John 1:23. Although John the Baptist ministered the gospel message of repentance primarily in Judea, (to whom it came first) it eventually reached the scattered Israelites of the house of Israel (then called "Gentiles"). In other words, they were all Israel to whom this "word of our God" (Isaiah 40:8) and the "good tidings" (Isaiah 40:9) would be proclaimed.

The Biblical Gospel - Part 11

 At the first recorded preaching of the gospel after Christ's ascension, Peter addresses the "men of Judea" and those "that dwell at Jerusalem," (Acts 2:14) the "men of Israel" (Acts 2:22) and "brethren" (Acts 2:9-11) They were called to "repent and be baptized...for the remission of sins," (Acts 2:38) which would only apply to Israel who had understood that they had transgressed the Law under the Old Covenant (1 John 3:4 and Hebrews 9:15) and had therefore sinned. The "promise" (Acts 2:39) of "the remission of sins" and "the gift of the Holy Ghost" (Acts 2:38) was to Israel alone.

 Additionally, the promise in Acts was to Israel's "children" (of the house of Judah) and to those of Israel that were "afar off." (Acts 2:39) That those "afar off" are only Israelites is confirmed in the prophetic promise of Joel 2:28-32 by the specific designations of Israel's "sons and... daughters" (Joel 2:28) and those who came to "mount Zion and in Jerusalem" (at Pentecost, Acts 2:9-11) of "the remnant' (Joel 2:32) of Israel.

 There are other Old Testament references that identify the northern house of Israel as those who were "far off," such as Ezekiel 11:15-17. They are the prophet's "brethren, the men of thy kindred" (Ezekiel 11:15) who were "scattered" among the countries of the "heathen," (Ezekiel 11:16-17, or Gentiles, or nations) They were gathered together by the Lord under the New covenant in order to give them "a heart of flesh" so that they would be His "people." (Ezekiel 11:19-20)

 Finally, Daniel 9:7 plainly identifies the "near" and the "far off" as Israel of both houses: "O Lord, righteousness belongeth unto thee, but unto us confusion of faces, as at this day; to the men of Judah, and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and unto all Israel that are near, and that are far off, through all the countries whither thou hast driven them, because of their trespass that they have trespassed against thee."

 In Daniel's prayer of intercession for his people Israel, he makes it evident that "the men of Judah, and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and unto all Israel" are the ones who are "near" and "far off." That is, there were some of the house of Judah and a few of the house of Israel that were in the Babylonian captivity (the "near"), and those of both houses that were also scattered "through all the countries" where God had "driven them." (Along with the house of Israel, Sennacherib's Tablets (Luekenbill, Ancient Records Of Assyria And Babylon) disclose that over 200,000 men of the house of Judah (Judah and Benjamin) were also taken captive by Assyria (referred to as the "fenced cities" recorded in 2 Kings 18:13). Thus, all twelve tribes were represented in the dispersion) Obviously, only Israel is in view here as comprising the "near" and the "far off." The Bible is consistent in this designation of Israel.

 Although there are other Old Testament passages which tie together one or more words or phrases of Ephesians 2:11 with the "near" and "far off" of Israel, the conclusion based on the evidence resented thus far is that the preaching of the gospel relates only to Israel, some of whom were also called "Gentiles" who were"afar off." They were the dispersed house of Israel mainly (along with a good portion of the house of Judah), the twelve tribes who were scattered and resided among other Adamic nations. Therefore, the gospel here does not include other races who also happened to be elsewhere around the globe, but only those of Israel who were "near" and "far off."

 The Gospel in 1 Peter: The Context of 1 Peter 1:24-25: "For all flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of grass. The grass withereth, and the flower thereof fadeth away: But the word of the Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the gospel is preached (euangelizo: Strong's #2097) unto you. " (1 Peter 1:24-25)

 1 Peter is addressed "to the strangers scattered..." (1 Peter 1:1). The word "scattered" is the Greek word diaspora (Strong's #1290) which means "dispersion, i.e...the (converted) Israel resident in Gentile countries." This is the same word used in James 1:1 to refer to "the twelve tribes (of Israel) which are scattered abroad." So we can clearly see that Peter was writing to dispersed Israelites.

 Peter also calls them "elect" (1 Peter 1:2), recipients of the "salvation" spoken of by "the prophets" of the Old Testament (1 Peter 1:10), and the "redeemed," (1 Peter 1:18) which all refer back to physical Israel. Further, Peter's readers are identified as "a holy priesthood," (1 Peter 2:5) "a holy nation," (1 Peter 2:9) and "a peculiar people," (1 Peter 2:9) which likewise are all designations for Israel (see Exodus 19:5-6). According to the context of 1 Peter then, it was to Israel that this "gospel," found in 1 Peter 1:25, was preached and by which they were "born again." (1 Peter 1:23)

 Notice that in 1 Peter 1:25, "the word of the Lord" is directly connected to the word that was preached "by the gospel." the Greek grammar indicates that "the word of the Lord" and "the gospel" that was preached are one and the same. Literally, it reads, "but this is the word which was preached to you." According to 1 Peter 1:25, "the word which by the gospel" was "preached" was the same "word" referred to also in the Old Testament passage of Isaiah 40:6-8.

 The Context of Isaiah 40:6-8: "The voice said, Cry. And he said, What shall I cry? All flesh is grass, and all the godliness thereof is as the flower of the field: The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: because the spirit of the Lord bloweth upon it: surely the people is grass. The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever."

 The context of the above passage concerns a message of the prophet to "Jerusalem" (Isaiah 40:2) and "the cities of Judah" (Isaiah 40:9) in which lived Judean Israelites. Additionally, Isaiah prophecies that God will "feed his flock like a shepherd" (Isaiah 40:11) referring to a wider audience than just Israelites from Judah. The word "flock" throughout both the Old and New Testaments always refers to all Israel and only to Israel, and "shepherd" to Israel's God, Jesus Christ (see also John 10:1-18). (A complete treatment of these metaphors can be found in the book, Standing On The Premises).

 That Isaiah 40 is speaking to all Israel is confirmed by the familiar prophecy of Isaiah 40:3. "The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness. Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God."

 This prophecy about John the Baptist as the forerunner of Jesus Christ was fulfilled in the context of the New Testament in Matthew 3:3; Mark 1:3; Luke 1:76; 3:4 and John 1:23. Although John the Baptist ministered the gospel message of repentance primarily in Judea, (to whom it came first) it eventually reached the scattered Israelites of the house of Israel (then called "Gentiles"). In other words, they were all Israel to whom this "word of our God" (Isaiah 40:8) and the "good tidings" (Isaiah 40:9) would be proclaimed.

The Biblical Gospel - 12

 The context of Isaiah 40 then demands that the interpretation of "all flesh is grass" (Isaiah 40:6) is not referring to the flesh of animals or other races but only limited in scope to Israel. There is no reason in the context for a universal reading.

 Likewise, the repeat of this phrase in 1 Peter 1:24, "all flesh is as grass," must refer only to the race of Israel. It was to them that the words in 1 Peter 1:25 apply: "But the word of the Lord endureth forever." What word? The next sentence tells us: "...this is the word which by the gospel is preached..." The word to Israel prophesied in Isaiah 40 is the same "word" of the gospel fulfilled in the ministry of John the Baptist and Jesus Christ in the New Testament. So, the "gospel," according to 1 Peter, was to and for Israel exclusively.

 Is the Judeo-Christian gospel the Biblical gospel? In terms of the Person and work of Christ; His atoning sacrificial death for sin and His resurrection from the dead, the Biblical gospel is preached. In terms of its intended recipients, the Bible clearly exposes the Judeo-Christian gospel to be false.

 The preceding evidence strongly establishes that the modern Judeo-Christian gospel is one that has severely erred as to the full meaning and application of the biblical gospel. Although the Judeo-Christian gospel bears some rudimentary semblance to the Biblical gospel in terms of the Person and substitutionary work of Christ, it has lost the full orb of purpose concerning the Kingdom of God and application in terms of its intended recipients.

 The Judeo-Christian gospel is, at best, a gospel of personal salvation. While the Biblical gospel is, in a limited sense, that as well, it also takes on a wider scope of the fulfillment of the covenant promises to Abraham and his chosen family line through the New Covenant in Christ. Further, the Biblical gospel, through this fulfillment, is the redemption of Adamkind and the restoration of their God-assigned task to establish the Kingdom of God on earth. The Biblical gospel includes both the promise of eternal life personally and the Kingdom of God on earth corporately. God is concerned with both aspects and not one to the exclusion of the other.

 Perhaps the most glaring deviation of all, however, is that the Judeo-Christian gospel has stepped outside the strict Biblical context in terms of application. That is, it has become an all inclusive, universal gospel open to all non-Adamic races. The Bible presents an opposite perspective. The Bible itself says the gospel was only meant for and applied to the Adamic race and the racial family of Adamic Israel. The Judeo-Christian gospel has opened the door to include all those whom God never intended to receive the covenant promises.

 Whether this wide spread phenomena came about and was sustained by false assumptions of a deliberate refusal for some reason to acknowledge the contextual logic of a racially exclusive Bible or fear of the persecution fallout of being politically and religiously incorrect or the manipulative efforts of the mongrel jews and their lackeys; it is the predominate opinion and practice of Judeo-Christendom today and it has some very serious and damaging implications.

 One of the most consequential implications is that the judaized, universal gospel serves as the theological underpinnings of the jewish New World Order. For the communist New World Order to be successful in global domination, all races and cultures must be put on an equal footing in defiance of the Biblical, historical and scientific realities of natural, racial and cultural differences. This is the key and why the present jewish controlled government and media make such an issue regarding racial and cultural equality. The universal gospel contributes mightily to the merging of different races and cultures that has presently lead us to a "melting pot" society thus destroying the natural racial order of God's creation (everything after its own kind). The judaized Christian, thinking that the gospel he supports is promoting peace and harmony, is actually and unwittingly creating an atmosphere of hate and racial tension.

 Why is it that the de facto government and compromised media, who support the conquest of all people, nations and countries via the New World Order jewish communism and is virulently anti-Christian, at the same time encourage the promotion of the universal gospel? For example, the government and media extol the virtues of any Christian person or organization that calls for the unity of all races and denounces racial separatism. The so-called government goes out of its way to entrap "churches" within the 501(c)(3) "religious organization" status luring them with fantastic tax subsidies. Most pastors and missionaries receive extraordinary consideration for tax deductions. Why? Whit is an anti-Christ government and media so favorable to those who promote the universal gospel? The whole thing is a contradiction. Or is it?

 The contrast to this is seen when the very few start promoting a racially exclusive gospel whom "the system' loudly defames as "hateful." they are called "terrorists." They become the victims of unscrupulous and unlawful threats by the I.R.S. and illegal surveillance of the F.B.I These are the targets of the jewish controlled media and theinordinate center of attention of a politically motivated, lawless judiciary. The obvious difference of treatment is because the judaized, universal gospel is a real boon for the New World Order, but the exclusive gospel, i.e., the gospel of Jesus Christ and the Apostles, is a real threat.

 Another implication of the Judeo-Christian gospel along this same line is the degradation of nationalism and national sovereignty. For the New World Order to advance its global agenda (and it is advancing fast), it must remove the obstacle of this idea of Christian patriotic nationalism. National borders and sovereignty must be eliminated in order for a supranatioal, world government to come into being. The universal gospel, since it promotes racial and cultural equality, has little or no objection to the elimination of borders for formerly sovereign nations and countries. Most White Judeo-Christians apparently make no protest to being governed by racial aliens of non-Christian cultures, which is the outcome of an anti-national, United Nations world government.

 Finally the Judeo-Christian gospel promotes the destruction of the White race allowing multiracial immigration, integration and miscegenation. This mixing of the races compromises the uniqueness and purpose of each race, which God has created. It dilutes the integrity of Christian principles and morals in Saxon society, not to mention anything of the genetic integrity of the White Race. The worldly idea of "tolerance" and "diversity," strongly promoted by the Judeo-Christian gospel, takes center stage above the hard realities of the laws of God for His people. God's laws demand a single focus on a righteous Creator and a separation from non-Adamic as well as anti-Christ Adamic people. The Judeo-Christian, universal gospel wars against a message God ordained exclusively for one race. Without that exclusive gospel, the chosen people of God will slowly disintegrate into annihilation far from the fully realized Kingdom of God.

 Once it has been accepted that the Biblical promises, covenants and salvation are for all races, it is a small step to encourage interracial marriages as socially and religiously acceptable. This acceptance of interracial marriages is perhaps one of the most insidious plots against the people of Israel and Adamkind who were given the mandate by God to take dominion and rule His Kingdom on earth. If the jewish New World Order can destroy the race of the people of God (and they are making great progress), then they will have also destroyed the dominion mandate of God given to His people. Then and only then will this jewish New World Order be free to rule this world without challenge or opposition. The universal gospel is one of the lynch pins of the New World Order whose end goal is the destruction of the White Race; sometimes called the "browning of America," and with it. Biblical Christianity.

The Judeo-Christian gospel is not, by a great measure, the Biblical gospel, but it feels so good. It appears so right. Nevertheless, it is not the whole truth and it will fail in the end with disastrous results because it is not the whole truth, but an adulterated gospel.

 "There is a way which seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death." (Proverbs 14:12; 16:25)

 If they find the Judeo-Christian gospel to be a dangerously compromised "gospel" of modern times, the call is to repent of it and come out from it. That truth seeking journey may ut lead noble Christian men and women into a new and glorious understanding of the Word of god and the beginning of restoring God's Kingdom on earth through establishing local New Covenant Israelite churches.

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