Kalifornia vs. Communism

Communist Party

 

   
 

 

 

 

 

 

Andrey Yanovski, lives in Russia (1984-present)

Answered May 16

2016 Parliament election results:

  1. United Russia (Nationalist Conservative) – 76,2%
  2. Communist Party of the Russian Federation (Communist) – 9,33%
  3. Liberal-Democratic Party of Russia (Centrist) – 8,67%
  4. Fair Russia (Socialist) – 5,11%

    That’s how communist Russia is. ~10% communist.

     



    Jim DavisImperfect, but not defective.

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    Jim Davis

    21h ago

    John, you missed the news when the 17 US intel services agreed that Putin had directed an attack on our 2016 election process to help get Trump, not Clinton, elected. I’m mystified by Americans following Trump right over to the Russians’ side.

    And you’re still in the dark about the Clinton Foundat…

    (more)

    John, you missed the news when the 17 US intel services agreed that Putin had directed an attack on our 2016 election process to help get Trump, not Clinton, elected. I’m mystified by Americans following Trump right over to the Russians’ side.

    And you’re still in the dark about the Clinton Foundation, which is sponsored by the Clintons but not owned by them. You must be thinking of the Trump Foundation, which shut down the same day the New York AG announced its investigation into Trump’s fraud there. Not everyone is a crook. Crooks like Trump think everyone is a crook, but they’re wrong. It’s just them.

    You may be right about bribing a billionaire with cash—assuming Trump really is that rich; it’s a subject of some debate and we only have Trump’s highly questionable word on it—but he is vulnerable in terms of his vanity. He wants to be famous for something other than screwing up almost everything he touches, like forming partnerships with the world’s great dictators of the day except for North Korea’s Kim, who he is determined to provoke into a war. And a man as vain as Donald Trump is vulnerable to blackmail; for example, what if Putin has Trump’s dreaded secret tax return? No, Donald Trump is the easiest sort of person for a spymaster like Putin to turn.

    Reply

    Your information is about 25 years out of date. On the DAY the Russians threw off the yoke of 80 years of OPPRESSIVE communism, I was in Red Square celebrating with them, dancing on a red, white, and blue flag, which I almost believed was the U.S. flag, all spread out on Red Square. It was not until the next day, when the Hammer and Sickle on top of the Kremlin had been replaced by that flag, that it was a Russian red ,white, and blue flag. At the time, Democrats loved all Communists, all the way from Russia to Nicaragua to Cuba to China.

    So why is it that today, when Russia is one of the most anti-Communist countries in the WORLD, that Democrats hate them.

    My purpose for that trip was to survey their semiconductor industry, so I had zero interest in what most executives at the Metropol Hotel across from the Kremlin had to say about buying Russian oil. We strategized together on how to conduct business there, but I was the only one who got a contract. The VP from Exxon who was trying despearately to buy Russian oil, and never did. It was not until Tillerson managed to get his one billion dollar oil contract with Russia

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    John Knight

    2h ago

    Your information is about 25 years out of date. On the DAY the Russians threw off the yoke of 80 years of OPPRESSIVE communism, I was in Red Square celebrating with them, dancing on a red, white, and blue flag, which I almost believed was the U.S. flag, all spread out on Red Square. It was not un…

     (more)

    Your information is about 25 years out of date. On the DAY the Russians threw off the yoke of 80 years of OPPRESSIVE communism, I was in Red Square celebrating with them, dancing on a red, white, and blue flag, which I almost believed was the U.S. flag, all spread out on Red Square. It was not until the next day, when the Hammer and Sickle on top of the Kremlin had been replaced by that flag, that it was a Russian red ,white, and blue flag. At the time, Democrats loved all Communists, all the way from Russia to Nicaragua to Cuba to China.

    So why is it that today, when Russia is one of the most anti-Communist countries in the WORLD, that Democrats hate them:

    quote

    Andrey Yanovski, lives in Russia (1984-present)

    Answered May 16

    2016 Parliament election results:

    United Russia (Nationalist Conservative) – 76,2%

    Communist Party of the Russian Federation (Communist) – 9,33%

    Liberal-Democratic Party of Russia (Centrist) – 8,67%

    Fair Russia (Socialist) – 5,11%

    That’s how communist Russia is. ~10% communist..

    unquote

    My purpose for that trip was to survey their semiconductor industry, so I had zero interest in what most executives at the Metropol Hotel across from the Kremlin had to say about buying Russian oil. We strategized together on how to conduct business there, but I was the only one who got a contract. The VP from Exxon, who was trying desperately to buy Russian oil, never did.

    That was delayed until Tillerson, now our Secretary of State,  managed to get his one billion dollar oil contract with Russia, almost a quarter of a century later.

     

     

    http://www.dailybulletin.com/article/zz/20130113/NEWS/130118554

    California law keeps Communist Party members from teaching

    By Beau Yarbrough, Staff Writer

    POSTED: 01/13/13, 12:01 AM PST |

    6 COMMENTS

    California’s schools are, in many cases, a child’s first exposure to people different than their family members.

    They might speak different languages, look different or believe in different things.

    But legally, there’s one thing their teachers cannot be: Communists.

    In the Golden State, even being a member of the Communist Party is still a firing offense 59 years after the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s hearings on communists in the federal government and 23 years after the end of the Cold War.

    California Education Code Sec. 44932 outlines the reasons a school employee can be fired.

    Firing offenses include immoral or unprofessional conduct, “criminal syndicalism,” dishonesty, unsatisfactory performance, evident unfitness for service, a physical or mental condition making the employee unfit to instruct or associate with children, persistent violation of state or local school policies, conviction of a felony or any crime involving moral turpitude, alcoholism or drug abuse – or membership in the Communist Party.

    “It’s a remnant of the Cold War era and should have long been dropped from the Educational Code,” said Juan Lopez, the California chairman for the Communist Party USA.

    Communists aren’t a registered political party in California, but they’re still around, and in good numbers, he said.

    “We have more teachers that have joined the Communist Party than any other professions,” he said.

    “More than anything, we laugh about it,” said Luis Rivas, a member of the Southern California Young Communists League. “Historically, in the U.S., there’s always been this pretty turbulent tension between the U.S. and Soviet Union.”

    And that’s especially true in the Golden State despite California’s contemporary reputation as a bastion of leftist politics.

    “There’s always been a very deep conservative strain, particularly in politics, in California,” said Eileen Wallis, who chairs the history department at Cal Poly Pomona. “You’ve got to remember, we produced both Nixon and Reagan.”

    The Golden State actually beat McCarthy to the punch with anti-communist campaigns. State Sen. Jack B. Tunney’s California Un-American Activities Committee’s hearings predated McCarthy’s by more than six years.

    The prohibition against Communists isn’t the only vestige of the Cold War affecting teachers.

    “We are still required as public employees to take a loyalty oath to the state of California,” Wallis said. “People in the CSU still occasionally lose their jobs for refusing to sign it.”

    Those who refuse to sign the oath typically do so for religious reasons, she said.

    California’s Communists don’t advocate a violent overthrow of the government or the American system of governance, Lopez said.

    “It’s the people of our country that have to make a choice about the direction our country has to take,” he said. “We obviously think a socialist USA would be better, but by `socialist,’ we mean people, working people, in charge of the country instead of the corporations and the lobbyists.”

    Lopez, who has been active in Community Party circles for more than four decades, said the law hasn’t been used to persecute any teachers, even those open about their political beliefs.

    “The Communist Party has been on the forefront of the struggle to fight for public education and fight the cuts that have come down since recent years,” he said.

    “I know a few anarchist teachers and a few radicals in the school system,” said Rivas. “I think most people tend to keep it quiet.”

    Local legislators aren’t sure if teachers should be required to keep even their radical political affiliations a secret.

    “There was a time when both Republicans and Democrats saw the Communist Party as a threat,” said Assemblyman Tim Donnelly, R-Hesperia. “Ronald Reagan was a Democrat who fought the communists who took over his union.”

    Donnelly is no fan of the political left, to put it mildly.

    “The leadership of the Democratic Party in California have more in common with the Communist Party than they do with the Democratic Party of the JFK era,” he said. “I find the idea of confiscating the wealth of hardworking people in order to fund all these socialist schemes of the Democrats who are in charge to be absolutely appalling.”

    But he opposes rules about who can or cannot be a teacher based on their political beliefs.

    “I think we need to get rid of laws and repeal restrictions,” he said. “I think if someone wants to think that way, it’s a free country.”

    One of Donnelly’s counterparts across the aisle agrees.

    “There are many, many things that are still in the law that probably need to be removed, and that would be a monumental task,” said Assemblywoman Cheryl R. Brown, D-San Bernardino.

    “I think of it in terms of the (segregationist) Jim Crow laws,” she said, “and there’s still some of that in there. As soon as it’s found, it’s taken out.”

    In 2008, an attempt to repeal the ban on Communists in the classroom, but then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed S.B. 1322.

    “Many Californians have fled communist regimes, immigrated to the United States and sought freedom in our nation because of the human rights abuses perpetuated in other parts of the world,” Schwarzenegger’s written response reads in part.

    “It is important particularly for those people that California maintains the protections of current law. Therefore, I see no compelling reason to change the law that maintains our responsibility to ensure that public resources are not used for purposes of overthrowing the U.S. or state government, or for communist activities.

    “For these reasons, I am unable to sign this bill.”

    Lopez hopes to see the ban repealed some day.

    “It should be repealed. Most definitely,” he said. “It’s a relic of the past that has no business being in the Education Code or anywhere else, for that matter. It’s really a violation of our constitutional rights, civil liberties, and so on.”

    But his younger comrade isn’t optimistic that the two dominant political parties will ever allow what he says they still consider a radical political belief into the classroom.

    “Whoever controls the minds of the next generation, basically controls the future,” Rivas said.

    Staff writer Andrew Edwards contributed to this report.

     

     

     

     

    50 U.S. Code § 842 – Proscription of Communist Party, its successors, and subsidiary organizations

    Current through Pub. L. 114-38. (See Public Laws for the current Congress.)

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The Communist Party of the United States, or any successors of such party regardless of the assumed name, whose object or purpose is to overthrow the Government of the United States, or the government of any State, Territory, District, or possession thereof, or the government of any political subdivision therein by force and violence, are not entitled to any of the rights, privileges, and immunities attendant upon legal bodies created under the jurisdiction of the laws of the United States or any political subdivision thereof; and whatever rights, privileges, and immunities which have heretofore been granted to said party or any subsidiary organization by reason of the laws of the United States or any political subdivision thereof, are terminated: Provided, however, That nothing in this section shall be construed as amending the Internal Security Act of 1950, as amended [50 U.S.C. 781 et seq.]

(Aug. 24, 1954, ch. 886, § 3, 68 Stat. 776.)

 

 

 

 

 

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — It has been just shy of 50 years since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a Washington state law barring members of the Communist Party from voting or holding public-sector jobs is unconstitutional.

Evidently, that is not enough time to remove it from the books.

Washington is one of a handful of states with similar laws still in existence despite their having been declared unconstitutional decades ago.

With few exceptions — most notably Georgia, where an anti-communist oath was administered to incoming Dunwoody City Councilmembers as recently as last year — the laws are treated as part of a bygone era, not unlike state statutes prohibiting interracial marriage, the last of which was removed from Alabama’s books in 2001 even though the Supreme Court ruled them unconstitutional in 1967.


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Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon, D-Burien, first introduced a measure to repeal Washington state’s anachronistic anti-subversives law last year, figuring, he says, that it would be an unceremonious end to a dead-letter statute originating from a dark period in our nation’s history.

He was wrong. Though his bill passed out of the House Judiciary Committee, it did so on a party-line vote, with four Republicans opposed.

With only so much political capital to expend on contentious legislation, House Democratic leaders declined to move it forward, and it never made it to the floor for a vote.

This year, Fitzgibbon lowered his sights, introducing House Bill 1062 with the understanding that it likely would not even get out of committee.

By the end of Friday, as a key deadline for policy-related bills passed without the bill coming up for a committee vote, that understanding was confirmed.

“There are some (Democratic lawmakers) that think this is a bad political issue for us, but I really don’t,” he said. “I don’t think there is a lot of fear in our state these days about the prospects of a communist takeover.”

That may be, but several decades removed from the Red Scare, any suggestion of kowtowing to communists can still inflame passions.

After Fitzgibbon spoke in favor of the bill in the House Judiciary Committee earlier this month, Rep. Matt Shea, a conservative Republican from Spokane Valley, was ready with a sharp rejoinder.

“For the large Ukrainian, Russian, North Korean and Chinese populations in the state who fled communism — including my wife, whose father was arrested by the KGB, who suffered horrible persecution, whose friends were sent to the gulag in Russia — do you see this as a little bit of a slap in the face to them that communism is not subversive?”

Responded Fitzgibbon: “I don’t believe we persecute people based on their political beliefs in Washington state, and I would say that applies to communists as well as anybody else.”

In addition to Washington state and Georgia, Pennsylvania and California have laws requiring state workers to take an oath swearing they are not subversives or members of a group dedicated to overthrowing the government. At least five other states — Connecticut and Virginia among them — have laws prohibiting subversives from working in emergency management. Illinois has a statute barring communists from seeking elected office.

Thanks to a series of 1960s U.S. Supreme Court rulings that found them to be unconstitutional, those laws have long been all-but unenforceable.

The ruling that struck down Washington state’s statute on subversive activities, handed down in 1964, found that the definition of a subversive group was too vague.

Three years later, the Supreme Court ruled that Eugene Frank Robel, a worker at the Todd Shipyard in Seattle, had been wrongly fired from his job building warships over his membership in the Communist Party.

“Robel put the nail in the coffin” for laws limiting communists from public-sector jobs, says University of Washington Law Professor Stewart Jay. “If you can’t fire (a communist) working in national defense, what can you do?”

But while the Supreme Court struck down loyalty oaths that predicate public-sector employment on a lack of affiliation with a subversive group, it has upheld less-expansive pledges to defend the United States from its enemies and uphold the Constitution.

Including those that also have anti-subversives oaths, at least 13 states have such laws on their books, including Florida, Tennessee and Arizona.

In California, Marianne Kearney-Brown, a math instructor at California State University East Bay who refused to take such an oath as a Quaker and a pacifist was fired from her post in 2008 before swiftly being reinstated and assured that she would not be forced to take up arms.

Periodically, a lawmaker seeking to stem the perceived tide of cultural decline will propose a new loyalty oath. Last month, a Republican state lawmaker in Arizona, Rep. Bob Thorpe, proposed legislation requiring high school students to swear an oath defending the Constitution before being allowed to graduate. That measure, House Bill 2467, is pending.

In general, though, such efforts are on the wane — a state of affairs not lost on communists themselves.

“It’s a good thing to get rid of these laws,” says Libero Della Piana, vice chair of the Communist Party USA. “But the reality is that people are more worried about foreclosures on their houses than subversives in student government.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Alien Registration Act of 1940 (Smith Act), 76th United States Congress, 3d session, ch. 439, 54 Stat. 67018 U.S.C. § 2385 is a United States federal statute enacted June 29, 1940, that set criminal penalties for advocating the overthrow of the U.S. government and required all non-citizen adult residents to register with the government.

Approximately 215 people were indicted under the legislation, including alleged communistsanarchists, and fascists. Prosecutions under the Smith Act continued until a series of United States Supreme Court decisions in 1957[2] reversed a number of convictions under the Act as unconstitutional. The statute has been amended several times.

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