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jew "doctors" kill 45 TIMES more Americans *each year* than Al Qaeda ever killed in its lifetime

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/25/health/research/25patient.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&src=igw
Fifteen thousand patients per month times 12 months per year = 180,000 DEAD AMERICANS each year, making jew “doctors” 45 TIMES more deadly than all 1.2 BILLION Muslims in the world, even IF we give them credit for ALL 4,000 the Americans who died in 9/11 (which I don’t).

<<<A recent government report found similar results, saying that in October 2008, 13.5 percent of Medicare beneficiaries — 134,000 patients — experienced “adverse events” during hospital stays. The report also said that extra treatment needed as a result of the injuries could cost Medicare several billion dollars a year. In 1.5 percent of the patients — 15,000 patients in the month studied — harm from medical treatment contributed to their deaths. The report, issued this month by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services, was based on an analysis of a sample Medicare records of patients discharged from hospitals in October 2008. >>>

John Knight

Mistakes Still Prevalent in Hospital Care, Study Finds

By DENISE GRADY
Published: November 24, 2010

127hrs_120x60_anim_np.gif
Efforts to make hospitals safer for patients are falling short, researchers report in the first large study in a decade to analyze harm from medical care and to track it over time.
The study, conducted from 2002 to 2007 in 10 North Carolina hospitals, found that harm to patients was common and did not decrease. The most common problems were complications from procedures or drugs, followed by hospital-acquired infections.
“It is unlikely that other regions of the country have fared better,” said Dr. Christopher P. Landrigan, the lead author of the study and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. The study is being published on Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine.
The study is one of the most rigorous efforts to collect data about patient safety since a landmark report in 1999 found that medical mistakes caused as many as 98,000 deaths and more than one million injuries a year in the United States. That report, by the Institute of Medicine, an independent group that advises the government on health matters, led to a national movement to reduce errors and make hospital stays less hazardous to patients’ health.
Among the preventable problems that Dr. Landrigan’s team identified were severe bleeding during surgery, serious breathing trouble caused by a procedure being performed incorrectly, a fall that dislocated a patient’s hip and damaged a nerve and vaginal cuts caused by a vacuum extraction device used to help deliver a baby.
Dr. Landrigan’s team focused on North Carolina as the best place to look for improvements because its hospitals, compared with those in most states, have been more involved in programs to increase patient safety.
But instead of improvements the researchers found a high rate of problems, and no change over time. About 18 percent of patients were harmed by medical care, some more than once, and 63.1 percent of the injuries were judged to be preventable. Most of the problems were temporary and treatable, but some were serious and a few, 2.4 percent, caused or contributed to a patient’s death, the study found.
The findings were a disappointment but not a surprise, Dr. Landrigan said. Many of the problems were caused by the failure of hospitals to use measures that had been proved to avert mistakes and prevent infections from urinary catheters, ventilators and lines inserted into veins and arteries.
“Until there is a more coordinated effort to implement those strategies proven beneficial, I think that progress in patient safety will be very slow,” he said.
An expert on hospital safety who was not associated with the study said the findings were a warning for the patient-safety movement.
“We need to do more, and to do it more quickly,” said the expert, Dr. Robert M. Wachter, the chief of hospital medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.
A recent government report found similar results, saying that in October 2008, 13.5 percent of Medicare beneficiaries — 134,000 patients — experienced “adverse events” during hospital stays. The report also said that extra treatment needed as a result of the injuries could cost Medicare several billion dollars a year. In 1.5 percent of the patients — 15,000 patients in the month studied — harm from medical treatment contributed to their deaths. The report, issued this month by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services, was based on an analysis of a sample Medicare records of patients discharged from hospitals in October 2008.
Dr. Landrigan’s study reviewed the records of 2,341 patients admitted to 10 hospitals — in both urban and rural areas and involving large and small and teaching and nonteaching medical centers. (The hospitals were not named.) The researchers used a “trigger tool,” a list of 54 items regarded as red flags in a patient’s record, indicating that something might have gone wrong. Triggers included certain drugs that were used only to reverse an overdose, the presence of bedsores or readmission to the hospital within 30 days of being sent home.
The researchers found 588 instances in which a patient was harmed by medical care, or 25.1 injuries per 100 admissions.
Not all the problems were serious. Most were temporary and treatable, like a bout with severe low blood sugar from too much insulin or a urinary infection from a catheter. But 42.7 percent required extra time in the hospital for treatment of problems like an infected surgical incision. In a few cases, 2.9 percent, patients suffered permanent injury — for example, brain damage from a stroke that could have been prevented after an operation. Certain problems (8.5 percent) were life-threatening, like severe bleeding during surgery. A small number, 2.4 percent, caused or contributed to a patient’s death — like bleeding and organ failure after surgery, or pneumonia caused by inhaling food, saliva or stomach contents.
“A third of the errors in the intensive care unit disappear when residents work 16 hours or less,” Dr. Landrigan said, although he noted that senior residents often work longer hours.
Computerized systems for ordering drugs can cut medication errors by 50 percent to 80 percent by correcting doses and alerting doctors if they request a drug that a particular patient should not take, Dr. Landrigan said. But only 17 percent of hospitals have such systems.
For the most part, reporting of medical errors or harm to patients by hospitals is voluntary.
“At a national level, we need a monitoring system that is mandatory,” Dr. Landrigan said. “There has to be some mechanism for federal-level reporting, where hospitals across the country are held to it and it’s not just a voluntary thing. We don’t have it. Voluntary reporting vastly underestimates the frequency of errors and injuries that occur.”
Dr. Mark R. Chassin, president of the Joint Commission, which accredits hospitals, cautioned that the new study was limited by its ability to find only the types of problems on its list of “triggers.” So if a hospital had performed a completely unnecessary operation, but had done it well, the study would not have uncovered it, he said. Similarly, he said, the study would not have found areas where many hospitals have made progress, such as in making sure that patients who had heart attacks or heart failure were sent home with the right medicines.
The bottom line, he said, “is that preventable complications are way too frequent in American health care, and it’s not a problem we’re going to get rid of in six months or a year.”
Dr. Wachter said the study makes clear the difficulty in improving patients’ safety.
“The study is telling us how hard improving safety really is,” he said. “Process changes, like a new computer system or the use of a checklist, may help a bit, but if they are not embedded in a system in which the providers are engaged in safety efforts, educated about how to identify safety hazards and fix them, and have a culture of strong communication and teamwork, progress may be painfully slow.”
Leah Binder, the chief executive officer of the Leapfrog Group, a patient safety group whose members include large employers trying to improve health care, said it was essential that hospitals be more open about reporting safety problems.
“Having to be transparent, and to allow yourself to be compared to other hospitals, can have an effect,” Ms. Binder said. “What we know works in a general sense is a competitive open market where consumers can compare providers and services. Right now you ought to be able to know the infection rate of every hospital in your community.”
For hospitals with poor scores, there should be consequences, Ms. Binder said: “And the consequences need to be the feet of the American public.”

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jew “doctors” kill 45 TIMES more Americans *each year* than Al Qaeda ever killed in its lifetime

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/25/health/research/25patient.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&src=igw

Fifteen thousand patients per month times 12 months per year = 180,000 DEAD AMERICANS each year, making jew “doctors” 45 TIMES more deadly than all 1.2 BILLION Muslims in the world, even IF we give them credit for ALL 4,000 the Americans who died in 9/11 (which I don’t).

<<<A recent government report found similar results, saying that in October 2008, 13.5 percent of Medicare beneficiaries — 134,000 patients — experienced “adverse events” during hospital stays. The report also said that extra treatment needed as a result of the injuries could cost Medicare several billion dollars a year. In 1.5 percent of the patients — 15,000 patients in the month studied — harm from medical treatment contributed to their deaths. The report, issued this month by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services, was based on an analysis of a sample Medicare records of patients discharged from hospitals in October 2008. >>>

John Knight

Mistakes Still Prevalent in Hospital Care, Study Finds

By DENISE GRADY
Published: November 24, 2010

127hrs_120x60_anim_np.gif

Efforts to make hospitals safer for patients are falling short, researchers report in the first large study in a decade to analyze harm from medical care and to track it over time.

The study, conducted from 2002 to 2007 in 10 North Carolina hospitals, found that harm to patients was common and did not decrease. The most common problems were complications from procedures or drugs, followed by hospital-acquired infections.

“It is unlikely that other regions of the country have fared better,” said Dr. Christopher P. Landrigan, the lead author of the study and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. The study is being published on Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine.

The study is one of the most rigorous efforts to collect data about patient safety since a landmark report in 1999 found that medical mistakes caused as many as 98,000 deaths and more than one million injuries a year in the United States. That report, by the Institute of Medicine, an independent group that advises the government on health matters, led to a national movement to reduce errors and make hospital stays less hazardous to patients’ health.

Among the preventable problems that Dr. Landrigan’s team identified were severe bleeding during surgery, serious breathing trouble caused by a procedure being performed incorrectly, a fall that dislocated a patient’s hip and damaged a nerve and vaginal cuts caused by a vacuum extraction device used to help deliver a baby.

Dr. Landrigan’s team focused on North Carolina as the best place to look for improvements because its hospitals, compared with those in most states, have been more involved in programs to increase patient safety.

But instead of improvements the researchers found a high rate of problems, and no change over time. About 18 percent of patients were harmed by medical care, some more than once, and 63.1 percent of the injuries were judged to be preventable. Most of the problems were temporary and treatable, but some were serious and a few, 2.4 percent, caused or contributed to a patient’s death, the study found.

The findings were a disappointment but not a surprise, Dr. Landrigan said. Many of the problems were caused by the failure of hospitals to use measures that had been proved to avert mistakes and prevent infections from urinary catheters, ventilators and lines inserted into veins and arteries.

“Until there is a more coordinated effort to implement those strategies proven beneficial, I think that progress in patient safety will be very slow,” he said.

An expert on hospital safety who was not associated with the study said the findings were a warning for the patient-safety movement.

“We need to do more, and to do it more quickly,” said the expert, Dr. Robert M. Wachter, the chief of hospital medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

A recent government report found similar results, saying that in October 2008, 13.5 percent of Medicare beneficiaries — 134,000 patients — experienced “adverse events” during hospital stays. The report also said that extra treatment needed as a result of the injuries could cost Medicare several billion dollars a year. In 1.5 percent of the patients — 15,000 patients in the month studied — harm from medical treatment contributed to their deaths. The report, issued this month by the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services, was based on an analysis of a sample Medicare records of patients discharged from hospitals in October 2008.

Dr. Landrigan’s study reviewed the records of 2,341 patients admitted to 10 hospitals — in both urban and rural areas and involving large and small and teaching and nonteaching medical centers. (The hospitals were not named.) The researchers used a “trigger tool,” a list of 54 items regarded as red flags in a patient’s record, indicating that something might have gone wrong. Triggers included certain drugs that were used only to reverse an overdose, the presence of bedsores or readmission to the hospital within 30 days of being sent home.

The researchers found 588 instances in which a patient was harmed by medical care, or 25.1 injuries per 100 admissions.

Not all the problems were serious. Most were temporary and treatable, like a bout with severe low blood sugar from too much insulin or a urinary infection from a catheter. But 42.7 percent required extra time in the hospital for treatment of problems like an infected surgical incision. In a few cases, 2.9 percent, patients suffered permanent injury — for example, brain damage from a stroke that could have been prevented after an operation. Certain problems (8.5 percent) were life-threatening, like severe bleeding during surgery. A small number, 2.4 percent, caused or contributed to a patient’s death — like bleeding and organ failure after surgery, or pneumonia caused by inhaling food, saliva or stomach contents.

“A third of the errors in the intensive care unit disappear when residents work 16 hours or less,” Dr. Landrigan said, although he noted that senior residents often work longer hours.

Computerized systems for ordering drugs can cut medication errors by 50 percent to 80 percent by correcting doses and alerting doctors if they request a drug that a particular patient should not take, Dr. Landrigan said. But only 17 percent of hospitals have such systems.

For the most part, reporting of medical errors or harm to patients by hospitals is voluntary.

“At a national level, we need a monitoring system that is mandatory,” Dr. Landrigan said. “There has to be some mechanism for federal-level reporting, where hospitals across the country are held to it and it’s not just a voluntary thing. We don’t have it. Voluntary reporting vastly underestimates the frequency of errors and injuries that occur.”

Dr. Mark R. Chassin, president of the Joint Commission, which accredits hospitals, cautioned that the new study was limited by its ability to find only the types of problems on its list of “triggers.” So if a hospital had performed a completely unnecessary operation, but had done it well, the study would not have uncovered it, he said. Similarly, he said, the study would not have found areas where many hospitals have made progress, such as in making sure that patients who had heart attacks or heart failure were sent home with the right medicines.

The bottom line, he said, “is that preventable complications are way too frequent in American health care, and it’s not a problem we’re going to get rid of in six months or a year.”

Dr. Wachter said the study makes clear the difficulty in improving patients’ safety.

“The study is telling us how hard improving safety really is,” he said. “Process changes, like a new computer system or the use of a checklist, may help a bit, but if they are not embedded in a system in which the providers are engaged in safety efforts, educated about how to identify safety hazards and fix them, and have a culture of strong communication and teamwork, progress may be painfully slow.”

Leah Binder, the chief executive officer of the Leapfrog Group, a patient safety group whose members include large employers trying to improve health care, said it was essential that hospitals be more open about reporting safety problems.

“Having to be transparent, and to allow yourself to be compared to other hospitals, can have an effect,” Ms. Binder said. “What we know works in a general sense is a competitive open market where consumers can compare providers and services. Right now you ought to be able to know the infection rate of every hospital in your community.”

For hospitals with poor scores, there should be consequences, Ms. Binder said: “And the consequences need to be the feet of the American public.”

Posted on 6 Comments

National Public Radio CENSORS Scripture!!

The discussion was about a teacher who was removed for attempting to censor the free speech and religious rights of one of his students:

http://www.npr.org/2010/11/16/131360383/teacher-suspended-after-stopping-anti-gay-talk?ft=1#commentBlock

The SCRIPTURE which was CENSORED, which was posted with NO COMMENTS, is the following:

But I tell you that it will be more bearable for Sodom on the day of judgment than for you, Matthew 11:24

There shall be no whore of the daughters of Israel, nor a sodomite of the sons of Israel. Deuteronomy 23:17

And there were also sodomites in the land: and they did according to all the abominations of the nations which the LORD cast out before the children of Israel. 1Kings 14:24

They die in youth, and their life is among the sodomites. Job 36:14

`And a man who lieth with a male as one lieth with a woman; abomination both of them have done; they are certainly put to death; their blood is on them. Lev 20:13

Here’s the message "explaining" why SCRIPTURE should be CENSORED:

Recent Activity

Comment on: Teacher Suspended After Stopping Anti-Gay Talk
Posted 11/16/2010 2:46 PM EST
An NPR moderator has removed this comment because it does not adhere to the discussion

John Knight

Community Discussion Rules

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Every website has its own rules, and these are our rules for participating in NPR social networking features, including discussions and comments. If you break them, don’t be surprised if we block your comments.

First things first: If you can’t be polite, don’t say it. Of course, we don’t want to stifle discussion of controversial issues. Some topics require blunt talk, and we’re not always going to agree with each other. Nonetheless, please try to disagree without being disagreeable. Focus your remarks on positions, not personalities. No personal attacks, name calling, libel, defamation, comments about someone’s mother, hate speech, comparisons to notorious dictators – you get the idea. And under no circumstances should you post anything that could be taken as threatening, harassing, bullying, obscene, pornographic, sexist or racist.

Don’t use obscenities

Posted on 4 Comments

Wrangled by Rangel

Failed to pay TAXES on real estate? Is that worse than drunk driving?
Doesn’t “equality” mean that WE get to get “censured” for DUI, or failing to pay taxes, or any of the other ten CRIMES HE WAS CONVICTED OF, rather than face the REAL punishment?
They MAKE the laws, but never for THEMSELVES, only for US!

For the SAME crime, Wesley Snipes got three YEARS, Rangel the Wrangler got two TONGUE lashings.Rangel wants “equality”?  Then EQUALIZE this.

These are the same guys who, in this land of the free and home of the brave, with a Second Amendment right to bear arms, passed 22 THOUSAND gun control laws, and 26 THOUSAND laws just for the care, handling, and transportation of cabbage. And now they can’t even follow a SIMPLE law about paying income taxes? These laws they demanded and GOT are so complicated that not even an ATTORNEY can tell you whether or not you’re violating a law. But the law Wrangle violated is SIMPLE. Did you know that the reason judges finally threw out the Enron and Broadcom suits is that even they realized that the laws these Wranglers passed are so complicated that not even the PROSECUTORS could figure out what’s legal and what’s not.
By Wranglers’ own admission, we now know that they PASSED these laws only because they NEVER intended to be ruled by them–that they intended them only for US.

http://politics.newsvine.com/_news/2010/11/18/5488219-ethics-committee-to-meet-on-rangels-punishment?&last=1290197646&threadId=1136668&commentId=19564700#c19564700 

Michael-1150681

The Senate & Congress has embrassed themselves by creating the “RANGLE RULE.” The rule is that the “rulers” (Senators – Congressmen – Federal employees) can neglect and not pay their taxs, but every swinging man & child in the USA must pay theirs under penalty of prison or even death!

This corruption by the “ruling class” must stop and it should with collecting the $Billions that the Federal employees refuse to pay and then every Senator and Congressman/woman will have their balls cut off when he/she is caught stealing their tax money.

Next tax term I intend to claim 6 children dependents and when the Feds come to get me I’ll claim innocence based on the “Rangle Defense.” Thank you TURDS in Washington, D.C. for being upfront honest people. I just gagged on that!  

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Reply#1426 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 9:43 AM PST

Pedro-2689353

How can a man that has been so corrupt now ask for MERCY? He should have been thinking about the people that he represented in lieu of lining his pocket at the expense of the people that he represented and just plainly ignored.
Like most politicians, he is voted in without much personal worth, becomes corrupt and as a result ends up very wealthy. He is nothing but a thief and should be treated as such.
A reprimand by the House is not sufficient; he should be removed from office, given a jail sentence, assets that he obtained while in office should be confiscated, his government retirement pension and any other government freebies taken away, and he should be branded for what he is “a NO GOOD CROOK”.
Why hasn’t the IRS initiated an investigation of Rangel for all of his illegally activities and illegal filing of tax returns?
Why is it that WE THE PEOPLE are crucified when we do something incorrect, while all of these corrupt politicians get off with just a very light spanking or repremand when they rob and conduct illegal activities?
What has happen to justice??

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Reply#1427 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 9:58 AM PST

PAUL-2689396

If this was a person that payes taxes every year and didn’t pay one year what do you think would happen to him. I think the Senator should be charged the same as anybody else. This man should be thrown out of Congress and should be held accountable the same as all the rest of the American People.

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Reply#1428 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 10:07 AM PST

Drain The Swamp

In the photo of him looking at his Rolex, was he thinking how much he swindled to get it. Like Nancy Pelosi says time to drain the swamp

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Reply#1429 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 10:13 AM PST

WychDoctor George

Time for the same laws to apply to congress as to the people. You do a crime, you do time! Or else, if I refuse to pay my taxes or fraudulently get into a subsidized apartment and get caught, I demand that I just be “censured” – no penalties, no jail time. If it is good enough for congress, should be good enough for the people.

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Reply#1430 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 10:35 AM PST

steveO-334978

That’s a great point. We should demand equal treatment under the law. This is the reason so many people are disgusted with our Federal Government. Bunch of fat cats living off our hard earned dollar.

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#1430.1 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 10:56 AM PST

Reply

Rick in the Forest

“One of Congress’ most likable veterans……..” Huh? Liked by who? Maxine Watters? Sheila Jackson-Lee? Jesse Jackson? One of Congress’ longest-serving scoundrels is a much better way of describing Mr. Rangel who should by all rights be expelled rather than simply subjected to a public scolding by Nancy Pelosi.

Suppose Mr. Rangel were to simply not show up for the token gesture of opprobrium. What then? He did, after all, walk out on the first day of his hearing. What then? Track him down in the john and give him two tongue lashings??

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Reply#1431 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 10:44 AM PST

Neil-798344

“two tongue lashings”?

Was that intended to be a homophobic remark??

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#1431.1 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:59 AM PST

Reply

Frank-391804

He should have been expelled at the very least and criminal prosecution should have been next.

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Reply#1432 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:08 AM PST

Mike-1506968

I guess I missed something along the way! 17 years of filing bogus tax returns and hiding it from the IRS and all he gets is a possible censure! If it was a normal citizen the IRS would have seized his assets, fined him and possibly incarcerate him. Lets face it folks we have the very best politicians money can buy.As far as the Black Caucus jumping on the race wagon in his defense I hope they re-consider the race card–if you do the crime you do the time

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Reply#1433 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:19 AM PST

alwaysfaithfull

Guillotine! Guillotine!…….uh sorry……wrong century…..uh…..and wrong country. How about a Congressional (Moe, Larry & Curly style) food fight and Rangel gets no pies to throw….just googles!……some of these comments are really getting a tad ridiculous…..

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Reply#1434 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:24 AM PST

gave up

Why didn’t he help Wesley Snipes? Who is going to jail for the same reason this guy is being “censored”….

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Reply#1435 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:37 AM PST

Jacob Israel

Perhaps this already posted, but I never saw it. Failed to pay TAXES on real estate? Is that worse than drunk driving? Doesn’t “equality” mean that WE get to get “censured” for DUI, or failing to pay taxes, or any of the other ten CRIMES HE WAS CONVICTED OF, rather than face the REAL punishment? They MAKE the laws, but never for THEMSELVES, only for US!

If it’s ‘EQUALITY’ he wants, then it’s ‘EQUALITY’ he gets!!

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Reply#1436 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:40 AM PST

hammer-521706

and in realty he should be the 323rd scuzz bucket locked in prison… glad to see that in the US the POS’s that make the rules are not bound by them while the folks that work, fight, and pay the bills are held to a set of “common folk” rules, like prison, and frozen bank accounts when we “mess up” when will people say enough is enough.

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Reply#1437 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:40 AM PST

Neil-798344

That’s it????

He gets a stern lecture????

He should at least get a day or two of detention on top of it.

Unbelievable…this is what happens when people are considered to be ‘above the law’, like Congress obviously is.

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Reply#1438 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 11:57 AM PST

Jacob Israel

For the SAME crime, Wesley Snipes got three YEARS, Rangel the Wrangler got two TONGUE lashings.

Rangel wants “equality”?  Then EQUALIZE this.

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Reply#1439 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 12:14 PM PST

dontgivemethepenguin

that was a committe investigating him, not the courts. Call the NY AG office and demand an investigation. Shou7ld be easy the committee has already completed their work for them.. Flood their phone lines today!

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#1439.1 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 12:32 PM PST

Reply

dontgivemethepenguin

everyone call the NY AG’s office Andrew Cuomo and demand that Rangel’s tax returns be audited 1-800-771-7755

NY IRS office 1-800-829-1040

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Reply#1440 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 1:39 PM PST

lccomo

What’s the difference between Rangel and Wesley Snipes? Oops, how foolish of me… Snipes is going serve 3 years.

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Reply#1441 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 2:07 PM PST

Kelly Car Guy

He will end up with a lite slap on the wrist He will get a raise

then write a book about how he was discriminated against

and then after Obama is out of office Rangel will file a lawsuit and be paid millions to let it drop

Just business as usual

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Reply#1442 – Fri Nov 19, 2010 2:08 PM PST