opioids

[bbp-single-forum id=$forum_id]

Why would Democrats continue to blame Trump for the opioid epidemic when they know that it had already exceeded 22 deaths per 100,000 population, and that the vast majority of the increase occurred after passage of the Affordable Care Act but, BEFORE he was even inaugurated?

AFTER ACA had passed

20,145 synthetic opioid deaths, an 8 fold increase in three years
15,446 Heroin deaths, a five fold increase in 6 years
14,427 natural opioid deaths, a 20% increase
10,619 Cocaine deaths, more than doubled in less than 3 years
7,663 methamphetamine deaths, almost tripled in 8 years
3,314 methadone deaths
71,614 total opioid deaths


/ 323.4 million = 22.1 deaths per 100k

 

ANNUALLY, during Obamacare there were:

20,145 synthetic opioid deaths, an 8 fold increase in three years

15,446 Heroin deaths, a five fold increase in 6 years

14,427 natural opioid deaths, a 20% increase

10,619 Cocaine deaths, more than doubled in less than 3 years

7,663 methamphetamine deaths, almost tripled in 8 years

3,314 methadone deaths

71,614 total opioid deaths PER YEAR.

BUT this is the 2017 data on ALL drug overdose deaths directly from the CDC itself:

Fentanyl – 28,466
Prescription opioids – 17,029
Heroin – 15,482
Cocaine – 13,942
benzodiazepines 11,537
Methamphetamine 10,333
Antidepressants 5,269

TOTAL DRUG OVERDOSE DEATHS PER YEAR = 102,058

Even though final data is not yet available for 2019, a simple straight line projection (not the empirical projection that ACTUALLY occurred) indicates that the total number of drug deaths will EXCEED 130,000!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summary

What is already known on this topic?

The rate for drug overdose deaths has increased approximately 140% since 2000, driven largely by opioid overdose deaths. After increasing since the 1990s, deaths involving the most commonly prescribed opioid pain relievers (i.e., natural and semisynthetic opioids) declined slightly in 2012 and remained steady in 2013, showing some signs of progress. Heroin overdose deaths have been sharply increasing since 2010.

What is added by this report?

Drug overdose deaths increased significantly from 2013 to 2014. Increases in opioid overdose deaths were the main factor in the increase in drug overdose deaths. The death rate from the most commonly prescribed opioid pain relievers (natural and semisynthetic opioids) increased 9%, the death rate from heroin increased 26%, and the death rate from synthetic opioids, a category that includes illicitly manufactured fentanyl and synthetic opioid pain relievers other than methadone, increased 80%. Nearly every aspect of the opioid overdose death epidemic worsened in 2014.

What are the implications for public health practice?

Efforts to encourage safer prescribing of opioid pain relievers should be strengthened. Other key prevention strategies include expanding availability and access to naloxone (an antidote for all opioid-related overdoses), increasing access to medication-assisted treatment in combination with behavioral therapies, and increasing access to syringe service programs to prevent the spread of hepatitis C virus infection and human immunodeficiency virus infections. Public health agencies, medical examiners and coroners, and law enforcement agencies can work collaboratively to improve detection of and response to outbreaks associated with drug overdoses related to illicit opioids.

 

FIGURE 1. Age-adjusted rate* of drug overdose deaths� and drug overdose deaths involving opioids�,� ï¿½ United States, 2000�2014

The figure is a line chart showing the age-adjusted rates of drug overdose deaths and drug overdose deaths involving opioids in the United States during 2000-2014.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality file.

* Age-adjusted death rates were calculated by applying age-specific death rates to the 2000 U.S. standard population age distribution.

� Drug overdose deaths are identified using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision underlying cause-of-death codes X40�X44, X60�X64, X85, and Y10�Y14.

� Drug overdose deaths involving opioids are drug overdose deaths with a multiple cause-of-death code of T40.0, T40.1, T40.2, T40.3, T40.4, or T40.6. Approximately one fifth of drug overdose deaths lack information on the specific drugs involved. Some of these deaths might involve opioids.

� Opioids include drugs such as morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, heroin, methadone, fentanyl, and tramadol.

Alternate Text: The figure above is a line chart showing the age-adjusted rates of drug overdose deaths and drug overdose deaths involving opioids in the United States during 2000-2014.

 

FIGURE 2. Drug overdose deaths* involving opioids,�,� by type of opioid� ï¿½ United States, 2000�2014

The figure is a line chart showing drug overdose deaths involving opioids, by type of opioid, in the United States during 2000-2014.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality file.

* Age-adjusted death rates were calculated by applying age-specific death rates to the 2000 U.S. standard population age distribution.

� Drug overdose deaths involving opioids are identified using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision underlying cause-of-death codes X40�X44, X60�X64, X85, and Y10�Y14 with a multiple cause code of T40.0, T40.1, T40.2, T40.3, T40.4, or T40.6.

� Opioids include drugs such as morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, heroin, methadone, fentanyl, and tramadol.

� For each type of opioid, the multiple cause-of-death code was T40.1 for heroin, T40.2 for natural and semisynthetic opioids (e.g., oxycodone and hydrocodone), T40.3 for methadone, and T40.4 for synthetic opioids excluding methadone (e.g., fentanyl and tramadol). Deaths might involve more than one drug thus categories are not exclusive.

Alternate Text: The figure above is a line chart showing drug overdose deaths involving opioids, by type of opioid, in the United States during 2000-2014.

 

TABLE. Number and age-adjusted rates of drug overdose deaths,* by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin,� Census region, and state �United States, 2013 and 2014

Decedent characteristic

2013

2014

% change from 2013 to 2014

No.

Age-adjusted rate

No.

Age-adjusted rate

All

43,982

13.8

47,055

14.7

6.5�

Sex

Male

26,799

17.0

28,812

18.3

7.6�

Female

17,183

10.6

18,243

11.1

4.7�

Age group (yrs)

0�14

105

0.2

109

0.2

0.0

15�24

3,664

8.3

3,798

8.6

3.6

25�34

8,947

20.9

10,055

23.1

10.5�

35�44

9,320

23.0

10,134

25.0

8.7�

45�54

12,045

27.5

12,263

28.2

2.5

55�64

7,551

19.2

8,122

20.3

5.7�

≥65

2,344

5.2

2,568

5.6

7.7�

Race and Hispanic origin�

White, non-Hispanic

35,581

17.6

37,945

19.0

8.0�

Black, non-Hispanic

3,928

9.7

4,323

10.5

8.2�

Hispanic

3,345

6.7

3,504

6.7

0.0

Census region of residence

Northeast

8,403

14.8

9,077

16.1

8.8�

Midwest

9,745

14.6

10,647

16.0

9.6�

South

15,519

13.1

16,777

14.0

6.9�

West

10,315

13.6

10,554

13.7

0.7

State of residence

Alabama

598

12.7

723

15.2

19.7�

Alaska

105

14.4

124

16.8

16.7

Arizona

1,222

18.7

1,211

18.2

-2.7

Arkansas

319

11.1

356

12.6

13.5

California

4,452

11.1

4,521

11.1

0.0

Colorado

846

15.5

899

16.3

5.2

Connecticut

582

16.0

623

17.6

10.0

Delaware

166

18.7

189

20.9

11.8

District of Columbia

102

15.0

96

14.2

-5.3

Florida

2,474

12.6

2,634

13.2

4.8

Georgia

1,098

10.8

1,206

11.9

10.2�

Hawaii

158

11.0

157

10.9

-0.9

Idaho

207

13.4

212

13.7

2.2

Illinois

1,579

12.1

1,705

13.1

8.3�

Indiana

1,064

16.6

1,172

18.2

9.6�

Iowa

275

9.3

264

8.8

-5.4

Kansas

331

12.0

332

11.7

-2.5

Kentucky

1,019

23.7

1,077

24.7

4.2

Louisiana

809

17.8

777

16.9

-5.1

Maine

174

13.2

216

16.8

27.3�

Maryland

892

14.6

1,070

17.4

19.2�

Massachusetts

1,081

16.0

1,289

19.0

18.8�

Michigan

1,553

15.9

1,762

18.0

13.2�

Minnesota

523

9.6

517

9.6

0.0

Mississippi

316

10.8

336

11.6

7.4

Missouri

1,025

17.5

1,067

18.2

4.0

Montana

137

14.5

125

12.4

-14.5

Nebraska

117

6.5

125

7.2

10.8

Nevada

614

21.1

545

18.4

-12.8

New Hampshire

203

15.1

334

26.2

73.5�

New Jersey

1,294

14.5

1,253

14.0

-3.4

New Mexico

458

22.6

547

27.3

20.8�

New York

2,309

11.3

2,300

11.3

0.0

North Carolina

1,259

12.9

1,358

13.8

7.0

North Dakota

20

2.8

43

6.3

125.0�

Ohio

2,347

20.8

2,744

24.6

18.3�

Oklahoma

790

20.6

777

20.3

-1.5

Oregon

455

11.3

522

12.8

13.3


TABLE. (Continued) Number and age-adjusted rates of drug overdose deaths,* by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin,� Census region, and state � United States, 2013 and 2014

Decedent characteristic

2013

2014

% change from 2013 to 2014

No.

Age-adjusted rate

No.

Age-adjusted rate

Pennsylvania

2,426

19.4

2,732

21.9

12.9�

Rhode Island

241

22.4

247

23.4

4.5

South Carolina

620

13.0

701

14.4

10.8

South Dakota

55

6.9

63

7.8

13.0

Tennessee

1,187

18.1

1,269

19.5

7.7

Texas

2,446

9.3

2,601

9.7

4.3

Utah

594

22.1

603

22.4

1.4

Vermont

93

15.1

83

13.9

-7.9

Virginia

854

10.2

980

11.7

14.7�

Washington

969

13.4

979

13.3

-0.7

West Virginia

570

32.2

627

35.5

10.2

Wisconsin

856

15.0

853

15.1

0.7

Wyoming

98

17.2

109

19.4

12.8

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality file.

* Deaths are classified using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD�10). Drug overdose deaths are identified using underlying cause-of-death codes X40�X44, X60�X64, X85, and Y10�Y14. Age-adjusted death rates were calculated by applying age-specific death rates to the 2000 U.S standard population age distribution.

� Data for Hispanic origin should be interpreted with caution; studies comparing Hispanic origin on death certificates and on census surveys have shown inconsistent reporting on Hispanic ethnicity.

� Statistically significant change from 2013 to 2014.

 

 

 

 

z`Divorce, Tobacco & the Polio Hoax

 

Fifteen million extra Americans died in the 20th Century due solely to the tripling of the cancer mortality rate in the US.

The root cause is the mass inoculation of 98% of the American population with the SV-40 Simian virus in the polio vaccines.

Why the high correlation between divorce and cancer mortality rates?

How the tobacco smoking hoax  was used to conceal the polio hoax.

THE REAL TRUTH ABOUT CANCER, Dr. William D. Kelley, D.D.S., M. S.

What happens when a nation fails to honor God.

 

When Fighting Cancer CAUSES Cancer

 

Many of the countries with the lowest cancer rates, are also the countries which “failed” [read: refused] to mass inject their innocent children with “vaccines” which were incubated in dead monkey livers.

Are we the only “civilized” nation which forces dangerous and amoral vaccines on innocent children

In Nigeria, less than 10% are vaccinated, they never had a polio epidemic, and they have 58% lower cancer death rate than us (96 vs. 152 per 100,000 population).

 

Cancer Deaths versus Public Health Care Costs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why does the U.S. rank fifth in both the rate at which cancer appears, AND the rate at which cancer kills?

List of countries by cancer rate – Wikipedia

According to Wikipedia, only four nations, Denmark, France, Australia, and Belgium have higher cancer INCIDENCE rates than us.

They are also the five nations whose public expenditures to “fight cancer” are even higher than ours.

Denmark 328 incidents per 100,000 population

France 324.6

Australia 323

Belgium 321

Cancer DEATHS

620 thousand cancer deaths last year is a cancer death rate of 193.2 per 100,000 population, which is mysteriously missing from the following Nationmaster table of cancer deaths in 188 other countries whose cancer death rates ARE listed.

All countries compared for Health > Diseases > Cancer > Cancer mortality rate (per 100,000 population)

What IS on that table is our cancer death rate of 133 per 1000,000 population in 2004 (when we ranked 85th in the world), proof that by the end of Obamacare, cancer DEATHS were up 45.3%, putting us in 5th place.

Just like cancer incidence rates, only 4 countries have cancer death rates higher than ours, but these are different countries: Maldives, Mongolia, Bolivia, and Hungary.

The most significant fact about he numerous countries, 183 of them with lower cancer INCIDENCE rates, is how much lower their cancer death rates are, and how much less are their public expenditures for “health care”, or “fighting cancer” actually are.

Even though it’s a different four countries in each case (incidence and death), the four countries which DO have a higher death rate have a total of 56,000 cancer deaths:

Maldives 306 deaths per 100k x 417,000 = 1,276

Mongolia 289 x 3 million = 8,670

Bolivia 239 x 10.9 million = 26,051

Hungary 204 x 9.8 million = 19,992

Total 56,000 cancer deaths

iow, even though we rank fifth, the four countries above us have a total of 56,000 cancer deaths, which means we have 11 TIMES more cancer deaths than all of them combined, do. AND the CDC still predicts that by 2012 our rate will be up another 4% to 201 which will be HIGHER than Hungary, putting us in FOURTH place.

This makes us the cancer leader of the WORLD:

1. In fighting cancer.

2. In cancer awareness.

3. In cancer research.

2. In cancer drugs.

3. In cancer incidence.

4. In cancer DEATHS.

We could argue that it was public health care spending which enabled France to fall from 4th place in cancer incidence to 38th place in cancer deaths (with a rate 19% lower than ours), except that this saved only 24,278 Frenchmen from dying of cancer.

And with 150 other countries around the world with even lower cancer death rates than France (and 179 with cancer DEATH rates lower than us), all of whose public spending for health care is dramatically lower than France, this is not even statistical proof that it was their cancer drugs and research and operations which enabled that.

Qatar spends less than 2% of GDP for BOTH their public and private health care, and yet has one of he lowest rates in the world (56, vs 191 here, and 154 in France). They also have an 8 year longer life expectancy than we do. Qatar is an amazing example which blows every argument for Obamacare right out of the water, because they spend one NINTH as much as us (2% vs. 18% of GDP), AND have a 5 year longer life expectancy, AND their cancer DEATH rate is one third of ours (56 vs. 191 per 100,000 population). This dispels the notion that our ultra high cancer death rate is due to older people who live longer also have higher cancer death rates. AND that public spending for health care is a constitutional right. AND it illustrates that we COULD have had an even longer life expectancy than Qatar had we stayed the course on PRIVATE health care. JUST having a cancer death rate like theirs would save 441,000 American lives PER YEAR, which by itself would go a long way toward that goal.

 

Public spending for health care in both Singapore and Syria is also less than 1% of GDP, and yet the cancer death rate in Syria is one third of ours, and Singapore has a 4 year longer life expectancy.

THIS YEAR, China officially has a longer life expectancy than we do.

In less than 70 years, the nasty Chinese Communist government managed to increase China’s life expectancy from 44 to 77, and they did it while holding public spending for health care below 2% of GDP (about one fifth of our PUBLIC spending, but one ninth of our total health care spending).

Clearly our having a 33% higher cancer death rate than China is a main contributor to our lower life expectancy.

And even though free health care and cancer research and cancer operations did get these civilized nations off the top 5 in cancer death rates, they still ranked in the top third, and had death rates two or three times higher than Qatar, Syria, Tunisia, Cook Islands, UAE, Morocco, and Georgia, all of whose public expenditures for health care were less than 2% of GDP (one fifth of Sweden, Netherlands, France, Norway, and ours).

http://www.google.com/publicdata…

If our rate were equivalent to China, we would have 204,930 fewer cancer deaths EACH YEAR.

If it were equivalent to Qatar, we would have 438,926 fewer cancer deaths EACH YEAR.

NOTES

China 143 x 1.38 billion = 1,973,400

India 100 x 1.32 billion = 1,320,000

There IS another way to view this.

What we SHOULD DO is simply take a trip to Qatar or Georgia, or Kuwait, or Egypt (as I already have) to discover how they managed to reduce their already LOW cancer death rate, to even lower, during the same time both our government spending for health care exploded even faster than the TRIPLING of cancer deaths here.

Georgia is actually a really nice place to visit. Don�t you think we should understand more about how they managed to reduce the cancer death rate for men from 99.5 to 92.6, at the SAME time ours TRIPLED (to more than twice as high).

http://www-dep.iarc.fr/WHOdb/tab…

USA Cancer DEATHS

1950

male = 106,904

female = 103,690

total = 210,594

population = 152.3 million, = 138.3

1960

male = 143,500

female = 124,055

total = 267,555

180.7 million = 148.1

1970

male = 180,126

female= 150,546

total = 330,672

205.1 million = 161.2

2004

male = 287,585

female = 267,211

total = 554,796

population = 292.8 million, rate = 189

2013

male = 308,608

female= 277,449

total = 586,057

2017

total = 621,000

325.7 million, = 191

U.K.

1950

Male = 206

Female = 184

2004

Male = 271

Female = 237

2013

Male = 268

Female = 230.7

Singapore

1965

male = 85.5

female = 59.7

2013

male = 160

female = 126

Mexico

1955

Male = 19.3

Female = 33.9

2013

Male = 57.6

Female = 58.9

Georgia

1981

Male = 99.5

Female = 65.7

2013

Male = 92.6

Female = 50.8

Kuwait

2009

Male = 22.1

Female = 28.2

1980

Male = 31.6

Female = 33

Egypt

1955

Male = 13.1

Female = 8.9

2011

Male = 38.5

Female = 29.8

Countries Compared by Health > Death from cancer. International Statistics at NationMaster.com

Year= 2000

U.S. = 322

Ireland = 358

U.K. – 253.5

All countries compared for Health > Diseases > Cancer > Cancer mortality rate (per 100,000 population)

2004

U.K. 147

U.S. 133

UAE 65

Countries Compared by Health > Spending > Per person. International Statistics at NationMaster.com

1998

U.S. = $4,271

U.S. 2017 = $10,823, X 325 million = $3,517 billion

Switzerland = $3,857, x $8.4 million = $32.4 billion

Ireland = $1,659, x $4.8 million = $8 billion

Singapore = $678, x 5.6 million = $3.8 billion

Lithuiania = $183, 2.9 million = $531 million

Georgia =$16, x 3.7 million = $59.2 million

Ethiopia = $4, x 102.4 million = $409.6 million

Japan = $2,243, x 126 million = $282.6 billion

China = $40, x 1.35 billion = $54 billion

India = $9.60, x 1.35 billion = $13 billion

Germany = $2,697, x 82.7 million = $223 billion

Indonesia = $8, x 261 million = $2.1 billion

Syria = $116, x 18.4 million = $2.1 billion

Total spending for almost two thirds of the rest of the world = $622.5 billion.

iow, WE spend MORE than FIVE times as much as most of the rest of the world, and get FAR LESS THAN NOTHING for it.

We don’t have all the data for all the African nations, but since the data we do have shows that they spend between $4 to $10 per capita, the average of $7, times the population of 1,216 million, gives us an estimate of $8.5 billion.

Ditto for the 422.5 million of South America, which ranges from $54 to $308, an average of $181, which times 422.5 million, equals $76.5 billion.

ROW = $707 billion

US = $3,517 billion

Total = $4,224

Percent in US = 83.3%

 

 

From the perspective of an Indian, the following stats might look great, because the most important thing to them is overtaking China–in population growth, that is.

The WHO collects their cancer death stats and puts it at 100 per 100k, one third of ours, at 300.if we had no cancer operations and research like them, and had a cancer death rate like them, we would have 600,000 fewer cancer deaths PER YEAR.
There has been a lot in our MSM about how China has 2,500 cancer deaths PER DAY, which sounds dramatic, but this is a rate of only 60, which is one fifth of ours. They outlawed all these pharmaceuticals we use, and do no cancer operations, or cancer research, so if we were ABLE to follow their example, we could have 792,000 fewer cancer deaths PER YEAR.

From Hiroshima to Fukushima


Even after all the radiation deaths from Hiroshima and Fukushima, Japan has a cancer death rate one half of ours. Otherwise they might have a cancer death rate equivalent to China without cancer operations and research.

Free Cancer


Denmark is famous for their “free” health care, and “free” cancer operations, and “excellent” cancer research.  But they are also one of the few with a higher cancer death rate than us–350 now, up from 250 in 1980.
Deaths due to our fast cars, guns, texting and sodas are minuscule compared to that. All other countries, now including China, have them too. And the NCVS survey shows that for each one gun used for murder, 8 are used for self defense.
The notion that our 350,000 obesity deaths PER YEAR are caused by sodas has been DEBUNKED a thousand ways. All it did was conceal the real reason which every other health care system in the world outlawed from the getgo–which is why everyone from Korea to China to Russia has an obesity rate ONE SIXTIETH of ours, which most likely is another factor in our record high cancer DEATH rate.

 

 

 

 

 

American Paranoia About Breast Cancer

National Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 60, No. 4 AND Vol. 47, No. 9

1) Of 573,855 cancer deaths in the US each year, only 41,360 (or 7% of them) are due to breast cancer (a rate of 12.3 per 100,000).

2) 49,150 deaths are due to pneumonia, 19% more than due to breast cancer.

3) 777,548 die of heart disease, 35% more than die of cancer and 19 times as many as die of breast cancer.

4) Almost twice as many (83,308) die of alzheimer’s disease than of breast cancer.

5) Almost as many die of septicemia (34,843) as die of beast cancer.

6) 68,905 die of Diabetes, two thirds more than die of breast cancer.

7) More people die of renal failure than of breast cancer (44,388).

8) Almost as many, 35,080, die in traffic accidents.

9) 37,793 commit suicide, almost as many as die of breast cancer.

10) 31,513 die from firearms, 37,792 from drug induced deaths, and 25,440 deaths are alcohol related, EACH of which take almost as many lives each year as breast cancer.

11) Black male youths are 10 times more likely to be murdered (123.1), 5 times more likely to die in a traffic accident (60.1), and 11 times more likely to die of AIDS (139.1).

12) Over age 65, White men are 54% more likely to die of cancer than White women(1,419 vs. 919.2) and 176,747 die of cancer each year, 4.3 times as many as die of breast cancer).

Why should our limited cancer research budget, or medical research in general, be limited to breast cancer when there are so many other places where research dollars would be so much better spent?


Even doctors admit that 50-90% of breast cancer operations are either unnecessary, overkill, or even fraudulent.

What they KNOW but will NOT tell you is that breast cancer surgery INCREASES, not decreases, the risk of death.

The “woman power” that Nancy Pelosi speaks of is the power of women to destroy themselves: if such children aren’t stopped in their tracks, ALL American women would die of breast cancer, or at least be getting the “free” breast cancer surgeries that have caused so many boobs to be lopped off unnecessarily, at GREAT expense to the American taxpayer, and to the great disadvantage to every other American’s health.

 

LINK BETWEEN SV-40, CANCER, AND AIDS

Government health care workers were unable to detect the SV40 virus until well after the plans were underway to inocculate the entire US population with the Salk polio vaccine [possibly because of some disinformation being spread by these jewish doctors], so it his highly probable that there are other better hidden monkey viruses in most Americans.  The long term effects of those hidden monkey viruses may be even worse than the already proven 10% increase in cancer rates, the worldwide AIDS epidemic, the 70,000 soldiers afflicted with Gulf War Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 3,000 deaths each year due to mesothelioma cancer, the Hepatitis B epidemic which is right now affecting mostly Asia and Africa, human T-cell leukemia, epidemic Karposi’s sarcoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, herpes (HHV-6,7,9), Epstein-Barr, and cytomegalovirus, all of which are attributable directly to the SV40 virus alone.

540,000 Americans die of cancer each year, so a 10% increase represents 54,000 additional cancer deaths annually in the US and 1,080,000 worldwide.  AIDS takes 31,130 American lives and 630,000 lives worldwide, each year.  Hepatitis B takes 6,000 American lives and 120,000 lives worldwide, each year.  Mesothelioma cancer takes 3,000 American lives and 60,000 lives worldwide, each year.

The SV40 monkey virus thus takes at least 94,130 American lives and 1,880,000 lives internationally, each year.

 

 

 

 

 

An epidemic